The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings. I am newly diagnosed as my fasting Blood Sugar level was 127. I am, of course, not very pleased to be a diabetic. Being a proactive kinda guy, I came here and I am looking for information.
My big question is "what next" in the form of what I can expect. Perhaps I should have gone to the introduce yourself forum first but I was too impatient for that.

Can you all get me started in this discussion? Can you all help me figure out what symptoms I have that I thought, two days ago, were just normal 55 year old aberrations and what symptoms I have because I am diabetic?

Everything I have read thus far talks about diet but I need a little more than that. I don't eat much sweets, I never eat anything fried, I don't eat white anything and haven't for years. I exercise regularly (treadmill 5-6 times a week) and my weight, though not great, is not so bad for a guy my age.

I promise to be a frequent contributor to and supporter of the forum. Can some of you diabetic veterans shoot me some helpful info?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
Watch out about what you read.. A diabetic cant control blood sugars. eating from the food parimed is a bad idea, to many carbs.

You need to controle your BGL.
your tools

Pills and or insulin
lowers BGL (blood glucose levels)
exercise
Lowers BGL
Food
carbohydrates (carbs) Raises BGL
especially bad carbs, almost anything white. white bread, potato, rice, sugar and worst of all Honey (eating a potato is worse than eating sugar as far as BGL goes.)
Protein and fat slows the affects of carbs.


Read the labels on food packages
get to know the Glycemic index of foods.


Basically those are the tools you have, use them well and you will have a long Happy life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
Hello Ken, and welcome!

A diabetes diagnosis is never pleasant news, but it isn't a disaster either, especially when caught as early as yours was. Did your doctor prescribe any meds or other treatment for you? Do you have a meter to keep track of your readings? You'll want to keep a log of all your readings, and a food journal also.

Diabetes86 has pretty well covered the main methods of treating this, and any combination is acceptable. Some of us use ALL of them, and that is not a bad thing - it's just what is required to keep our diabetes under control.

While it's good to have a trusted medical team working with you on this, the responsibility lies entirely with you whether or not your glucose is reduced and stabilized at lower levels.

A few things get turned on their heads when diabetes enters the picture, and the main one turned upsidedown is the food pyramid. A diabetic diet must rely more on protein & fats, and much less carbohydrate. The truth of the matter is, carbohydrate elevates blood glucose. Our bodies can derive the glucose needed by converting protein into glucose, so we do not need carbohydrate to provide it. Obviously the more fibrous and complex carbs can be a desirable component of our food plans, since they provide other vitamins, minerals & trace elements needed for good nutrition. But contrary to what the food pyramid teaches, carbs are NOT a necessary requirement for good health. Grains in particular can play havoc with our glucose, so even if you're using whole grains, it may not be the best thing for your diabetes right now.

It sounds like you have been avoiding fats, and that may be a weight-control measure. But as diabetes management goes, the fats are what slows the absorption of any carbs you may be eating, and is therefore another weapon in our arsenal to reduce BG (blood glucose). Many of us have found that weight loss is not sabotaged by including a moderate amount of fat along with the protein in our diets. It is the fat plus carbohydrate that has Americans tipping the scales so steeply.

I'm going to stop for breath here, and others will be along to contribute also. We have a good support group here and I thank you for joining us. We'll get a good dialogue going and I hope you'll come away with good ideas that work for you.

take care,

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the early responses but I am even more confused :). First off, I have my blood drawn before I see the doc. So, though I know that my fasting BGL level is 127, we haven't met yet to discuss this. So, no meds, no doc's advice yet.

I am confused about something I read here. Obviously, the goal is to keep my BGL low. But the concept of "having a low" confuses me. Of course, now that I have this blood test result, I am recalling feeling a bit light headed and maybe even a little out of it at times. Internet research had led me to conclude those episodes were hypoglecimic in nature - low BGL. So, do i want to keep my BGL low at all times? Is it a spike kind of reaction?

And, how do you all monitor your BGL's? Meters? Are they accurate?

And, what is A1C?

That's enough for now :). I am a smart ass by nature and was going to ask the meaning of life but I thought better of it. Thanks again for the responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
Thanks for the early responses but I am even more confused :). First off, I have my blood drawn before I see the doc. So, though I know that my fasting BGL level is 127, we haven't met yet to discuss this. So, no meds, no doc's advice yet.

I am confused about something I read here. Obviously, the goal is to keep my BGL low. But the concept of "having a low" confuses me. Of course, now that I have this blood test result, I am recalling feeling a bit light headed and maybe even a little out of it at times. Internet research had led me to conclude those episodes were hypoglecimic in nature - low BGL. So, do i want to keep my BGL low at all times? Is it a spike kind of reaction?

And, how do you all monitor your BGL's? Meters? Are they accurate?

And, what is A1C?

That's enough for now :). I am a smart ass by nature and was going to ask the meaning of life but I thought better of it. Thanks again for the responses.
Hello Ken. I try and keep my numbers in the 80-120 range, on the average. You will naturally have higher numbers for awhile after eating. A spike is a high blood sugar number which is more likely to occur soon after a meal.

You can find Google ads that will give you glucose meters (glucometers) free. You can call the company or, in some cases, order online. Many people go to Walmart and buy the Relion meter and the strips. The meter costs about $9 and a box of 50 strips about $20. That is less than half the cost of the more well known meters. My results on the Relion are just as accurate as on the more expensive meters.

I would like to know what your numbers are two hours after a meal. If you buy a meter you can start testing in the morning before eating anything (fasting) and again two hours after a few meals. That information will help us see what may be going on with you.

An A1c is a blood test that will give you a number that represents an evaluation of your blood sugar level for the preceding three months. A good level is less than 6.5%. i try t keep mine below 6.0% since that is considered a non diabetic level.

When do you see your doctor again?

Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
Smart asses are welcome here too . . . heheh! :D You aren't the first!

Our best tool in this campaign is our glucose meter. They prob'ly aren't as accurate as you would like, but I use one of the cheapest ones on the market, and it was only two points off last month when I had blood drawn for my routine lab work. The lab came back with 112 fasting - my meter said 114. But the FDA allows a 20% variance in meters, so a reading of 100 could be 80 or it could be 120, and still be within the allowable variance. There's also a movement afoot to tighten up these regulations, thank heaven! So if your doctor doesn't give you a meter, go get one yourself. If it's covered by insurance, you may need a prescription from your doctor for strips. The cost of strips can eat you alive, which is why I use the cheapie meter from Walmart, because their strips are half the price of many others.

The A1c is another blood test which can compute the amount of glucose attached to your hemoglobin, and since those cells have an average life of about 90 days, the A1c can show the doctor what your glucose levels have been running over the previoius three months. It's not the perfect diagnostic tool, and it needs to be considered together with the fasting blood level & sometimes even other tests.

As regards keeping BG low, we often set a target range and try to stay within it, and each patient makes his own decision about that range. For me personally, I choose 80-130 - trying to stay above 80 and below 130 at all times. Studies show that levels above 140 begin to cause organ damage, and the more frequent and more prolonged are those visits above 140, the higher risk of damage. The damage done by diabetes can affect several major systems; the more prominent areas being vision, renal function, peripheral neuropathy (numbness/tingling in hands/feet) and cardiac issues.

As regards "having a low", this is more apt to happen when using insulin, although it isn't unheardof with other patients. Our insulin-dependent members can correct me if I'm wrong, but I think a general rule-of-thumb is to treat with glucose tabs, fruit juice, or some other quick-acting sugar, if your level drops below 60.

And now I'm going to stop for breath again! :D :D :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,590 Posts
Hi Ken. Nice to meet ya! Not much I can add to what has been said already except to welcome you :)

You will know much more after you see your doctor. It would be interesting to know what your A1C is. That will tell you a lot right there. When do you see your doc again? A fasting blood sugar of 127 is higher than naormal, but the good news is that it isnt crazy high. Thats why I am saying your A1C will tell you a lot. Let us know how you are doing and how your dr appointment goes :) We are all here to help and support each other :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Hello Ken!

Being newly diagnosed is not pleasant, but good to see you're already taking action.

Everyone has given you a lot of information already, and I know it can be overwhelming! There's a lot to learn about diabetes, and it can take a while.

In answer to your question about 'what is a low', it is when your glucose falls beyond a certain level. Different people experience lows at different levels, it all depends on the overall control you have. My symptoms for lows are lethargy, unable to think properly, shakes and weakness, and I also get hot and cold sweats all at the same time. If you're in doubt, check your glucose meter (prick the side of your finger to make it bleed - less painful than the pad).

In Australia, our levels are measured differently. An American 100 in Australia would be around 5 - 6 mmol/L which is a pretty good level (according to my calculations).

You'll want to keep your glucose fairly low, but not so low that you're in constant danger of a hypo attack. Your doctor will be able to advise you further.

Did your doctor tell you what type of diabetes you have? Generally in older people it is Type 2 which can be controlled in a few more ways than Type 1 (which is what I have) with Insulin injections.

One thing that helped me when I got diagnosed as a kid, was how my educator explained the different types of Glycemic Index food.

The three categories she used were a 'racecar', a 'sedan car', and a 'bike'. A 'racecar' is a high GI food, so things like lollies, white bread etc. 'sedan car' is a middle of the range food, and 'bike' is a low GI, which raises your glucose slowly, like baked beans. You use the 'racecar' when you're low, and generally stick to the 'bike' or 'sedan car' other times. My educator also told me that a 'racecar' plus a 'bike' will result in a 'sedan car' type food haha. Not sure how accurate that really is, now I come to think of it. But basically if you have a glass of soft drink and eat baked beans, the overall result would be a middle of the range rise.

Sorry if I completely confused you - that's just what my educator told me all those many years ago.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Well, thanks to all those who responded - my new circle of buddies.

It's a lot to digest. I see my doctor next week but I'm gonna go sooner than that and have an A1C test. Seems prudent. All this is weird with no symptoms. I am a "this too shall pass" kinda guy and generally don't worry about aches, pains, and the like but this doesn't sound like it will go away.

Gonna go eat some eggs now...protein, no carbs, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
What is too low? usually 70 but some think 65 is OK below 45 and your mind dont work quite rite (confused) below 35 Risk getting a coma, below 25 risk the big D I may be off by 5 Pt's but you get the idea. if you start to see 70 you might want a small sweet snack, a small piece of candy. I keep "fun size" or Bite size Hershey's Crunch around. a nice treat for when I go low.

thing go wrong much below 70 and in a hurry. When you get better at control and knowing when your going "low" you can run closer to the lower end. Ease into it, dont over control, for now you got a lot to learn, it will come, Keep a Log book eat test, eat test, exercise test, sleep test, fast test:rolleyes: Lots of testing to see how YOU react to foods and meds and life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
But, why do diabetics go low? Is it because of meds? I am not taking any. Do un-diabetics go low? What causes the swings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
Well, thanks to all those who responded - my new circle of buddies.

It's a lot to digest. I see my doctor next week but I'm gonna go sooner than that and have an A1C test. Seems prudent. All this is weird with no symptoms. I am a "this too shall pass" kinda guy and generally don't worry about aches, pains, and the like but this doesn't sound like it will go away.

Gonna go eat some eggs now...protein, no carbs, right?
:welcome: It sounds like you have already got the low down on the basics. Three words test, test, test is the best advice I can give you. Thanks for becoming our friend! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Diabetics can go low because of a few factors: too much insulin and not enough food, too much exercise, and just sometimes randomly due to factors, ie if you inject into a bloodstream, your glucose can fall really fast and a low can result. Also if you're sick, your glucose can do strange things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
And sometimes going extremely high can then cause a reactive hypo (low). Non-diabetics don't have these swings; even if they eat a huge high-carb meal, they may spike for a short while, but drop quickly back into normal non-diabetic range. Because with us diabetics, our system has gotten skewed somehow, we can't process the carbs so efficiently, so even a small amount of certain foods can sometimes send our blood sugar to the moon.

Do you think you've experienced a low? Or know someone who has? It's the high glucose that is dangerous, and having lows is usually not a problem unless you're on insulin or meds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thanks for the useful information. I am newly diagnosed and reading and learning all I can at this point.

Looking forward to sharing with all of you!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top