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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I need your help and would appreciate any input and feedback regarding the drug NPH, and whether it is as effective as Lantus.

Because I'm on Medicare, I am required by my HMO to be a part of a yearly pharmacy treatment team review. Today I had a long discussion (on the phone) with my assigned pharmacist, and she said that in order to lower the cost to the HMO, it would be advantageous for me to switch over to NPH, which will require me to inject long acting insulin two times a day in contrast to the once a day injection of Lantus.

It will also require me to play around with my pre-meal Novolog injections in order to find the right dosage to compliment the NPH..

It has taken me the better half of a year to get my BG numbers down to a range of between 80-120 (on a regular basis prior to each meal and at bedtime), and I am reluctant to have to switch and start all over with the experiments while I get my BG levels back to an acceptable level, like they are now.

However, I did tell the pharmacist that I'd consider it the change after I did research on the drug, checked with forum members for input, and talked with me Endo (in person).

Thus, I am coming to you, my fellow diabetics for your input as to the pros and cons of using either NPH or Lantus.

It will only mean a reduction of ten dollars every three months in a co-pay, so it is not a big financial saver for me. It is only saving the HMO a lot of money, because she told me Lantus is five times the cost of NPH.

Thanks for any input from your own experiences. It will go a long way in helping me to decide whether to stay with Lantus, or capitulate and use NPH.

Shalom,

Pastor Paul :amen:
 

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I would rather die than go back on NPH. It is in no way anything like Lantus. The peeks you have with are severe and when it peeks you better be near some food. I is the meth of the insulin world , just terrible stuff. This is of coarse in my humble opinion
 

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I need your hekp and would appreciate any input and feedback regarding the drug NPH, and whether it is as effective as Lantus.

Because I'm on Medicare, I am required by my HMO to be a part of a yearly pharmacy treatment team review. Today I had a long discussion (on the phone) with my assigned pharmacist, and she said that in order to lower the cost to the HMO, it would be advantageous for me to switch over to NPH, which will require me to inject long acting insulin two times a day in contrast to the once a day injection of Lantus.

It will also require me to play around with my pre-meal Novolog injections in order to find the right dosage to compliment the NPH..

It has taken me the better half of a year to get my BG numbers down to a range of between 80-120 (on a regular basis prior to each meal and at bedtime), and I am reluctant to have to switch and start all over with the experiments while I get my BG levels back to an acceptable level, like they are now.

However, I did tell the pharmacist that I'd consider it the change after I did research on the drug, checked with forum members for input, and talked with me Endo (in person).

Thus, I am coming to you, mu fellow diabetics for your input as to the pros and cons of using either NPH or Lantus.

It will only mean a reduction of ten dollars every three months in a co-pay, so it is not a big financial saver for me. It is only saving the HMO a lot of money, because she told me Lantus is five times the cost of NPH.

Thanks for any input from your own experiences. It will go a long way in helping me to decide whether to stay with Lantus, or capitulate and use NPH.

Shalom,

Pastor Paul :amen:
Paul, I don't think you will like the results. Your body is the most important thing here not the governments bottom line. The government can make reductions elsewhere. With NPH there is a peak so you will have to make sure that you eat or you will go low. Then you have to be a wizard to take Novolog with it. If I had no choice, I could make it work, but you will not see the best fasting readings on NPH. Unless you want something else to do with your time, keep things as they are. I will only take NPH to SAVE ME money. I am not a big fan of the goverenment trying to save money where our seniors are concerned. My parents are both on Medicare and each have their Medicare premium deducted from their monthly check, my Mom gets very little and her increases have never been more than $1 per month. My father has a pension that offers their secondary insurance but it costs them $400 per month. Both are frightened to use their insurances, because they have to meet deductibles with Medicare and with their seconday insurance. Both of my parents need medical care but turn their head the other way because of the cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks

Paul, I don't think you will like the results. Your body is the most important thing here not the governments bottom line. The government can make reductions elsewhere. With NPH there is a peak so you will have to make sure that you eat or you will go low. Then you have to be a wizard to take Novolog with it. If I had no choice, I could make it work, but you will not see the best fasting readings on NPH. Unless you want something else to do with your time, keep things as they are. I will only take NPH to SAVE ME money. I am not a big fan of the goverenment trying to save money where our seniors are concerned. My parents are both on Medicare and each have their Medicare premium deducted from their monthly check, my Mom gets very little and her increases have never been more than $1 per month. My father has a pension that offers their secondary insurance but it costs them $400 per month. Both are frightened to use their insurances, because they have to meet deductibles with Medicare and with their seconday insurance. Both of my parents need medical care but turn their head the other way because of the cost.
This is the third time, in the past few months that the HMO is asking me to change to a less expensive medicine. In September of 2010, I received a letter from my HMO that in order to bring the insurance in line with the new Obamacare, they were making changes to the formulary, my co-pays tripled, and they are wanting us to use our primary care doctor more, and the specialists less!

I can't help but think that this request to go to nph, and help them save money on the Lantus is just another bump in the road due to the national health care plan. I've already cut back on several medicines to save me money at the pharmacy, replacing a few medicines with OTC items. However, I am reluctant to capitulate on this request!

I appreciate both comments I have received so far and look forward to others putting in their two cents!

Pastor Paul
 

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I am not on Medicare yet but in 4 1/2 years , I will be dealing with the same issues. At my last checkup my doctor recommended even though I am thin and bgs are good he feels I might need insulin at some point. We now have high deductible insurance so all our Rx's are out of pocket, so pricey insulin would be a big burden. My doctor suggested NPH at Walmart. When I asked around I got similar responses. That it is very hard to control and sometimes you have to split it into several doses to get good coverage. I would stick with the Lantus if you can. I have a sneaky feeling, this is only the start, we are going to see all sorts of pricey drugs restricted.
 

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In my opinion Lantus has a much more stable curve where as the NPH has a sharper peak. I thought I had better control when I using the Lantus over what I had with NPH. Cheaper is not always better.
 

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This is not a health care issue or part of the health care bill. It is about greedy people trying to squezze every penny they can get out of those that don't have it yo give.
 

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This is not a health care issue or part of the health care bill. It is about greedy people trying to squezze every penny they can get out of those that don't have it yo give.
I heartily agree!
It is absolutely not part of the healthcare bill.
 

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Stay with Lantus

I need your help and would appreciate any input and feedback regarding the drug NPH, and whether it is as effective as Lantus.

Because I'm on Medicare, I am required by my HMO to be a part of a yearly pharmacy treatment team review. Today I had a long discussion (on the phone) with my assigned pharmacist, and she said that in order to lower the cost to the HMO, it would be advantageous for me to switch over to NPH, which will require me to inject long acting insulin two times a day in contrast to the once a day injection of Lantus.

It will also require me to play around with my pre-meal Novolog injections in order to find the right dosage to compliment the NPH..

It has taken me the better half of a year to get my BG numbers down to a range of between 80-120 (on a regular basis prior to each meal and at bedtime), and I am reluctant to have to switch and start all over with the experiments while I get my BG levels back to an acceptable level, like they are now.

However, I did tell the pharmacist that I'd consider it the change after I did research on the drug, checked with forum members for input, and talked with me Endo (in person).

Thus, I am coming to you, my fellow diabetics for your input as to the pros and cons of using either NPH or Lantus.

It will only mean a reduction of ten dollars every three months in a co-pay, so it is not a big financial saver for me. It is only saving the HMO a lot of money, because she told me Lantus is five times the cost of NPH.

Thanks for any input from your own experiences. It will go a long way in helping me to decide whether to stay with Lantus, or capitulate and use NPH.

Shalom,

Pastor Paul :amen:
I would stay with Lantus. It is worth the extra cost. It was a dramatic improvement over NPH when introduced a little more than a decade ago. It eliminated my night time lows. Lantus is as steady as a rock. NPH is old technology. Taking more than one slow-acting insulin a day adds risk.
 

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I started out with NPH and I'm still on it. We get along okay, 'cause I tend to be spiky -- therefore, its peaks don't drop me -- and its curves match up fairly well with the vortex that passes for my daily routine. So far.

THAT SAID ... if I were on a "flatter" insulin, like Lantus or Levemir, I'd be inclined to scream real loud if my doc tried to switch me to NPH.

My HMO loves NPH 'cause it's cheap. So they resist switching me to anything else.
 

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I was on NPH I kept getting lows 4 to 6 hours after injecting, while driving, working, or sitting around. Needing food in a hurry. is not fun or good for you or others if your driving.

Lantris has much less of a peek. I have vertualy eliminated lows
 

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I am on Medicare also but my Drug Plan part D is not an HMO. I have never been questioned on my use of Lantus. I have had to ask my Doctor to fill out a paper saying how well it works for me. Did you look at other plans when you could in Oct-December to see if you could find a better plan for you?
 

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Going from NPH to Lantus was the best thing that has happened to me since being diagnosed. It eliminated my instances of severe hypos (ones where I did not realize it was coming on). Any hypos I have now are slow developing and I have time to react to them. But then again I am type 1 and must walk the tight rope daily.
 

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Lantus!

I changed from NPH tolantus 3 yrs ago and will never go back. Lantus provides a much more true baseline control instead of another set of peaks and valleys during our day.
 
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