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Discussion Starter #1
I find some people are very obsessive over BSL numbers. My expeirence is that 25% on eitherside is OK. e.g. the fasting BSL should be around 90 mg/ml. If this goes occasionally to 125, heaven is not going to fall on your head. So look at the figures in a little more relaxed manner.
 
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hi Dr Kandaswamy :) yep you're right it can become obsessive. But it's important to monitor your own BGLs though to know that you are sitting in safe levels otherwise you're risking hypos and diabetic complications down the track. So people tend to try to get the lowest number they can possibly get to avoid the complications part. But I have an endo who advises your levels need to be 'safe'. the HbA1c helps keeps us in check too... but we are always aiming to improve one our HbA1c test if we didn't get a good result previously. Here in Oz they like HbA1c to be ideally below 7... although they are Ok with it's below 8 (7-8 is a grey area), above 9 they start questioning things further and looking at diet, medicines, etc. I think lately the big push has been on 'preventing' diabetes... so a lot of 'pre-diabetics' being pushed to lower their BGLs to avoid full blown type 2 diabetes.
Personally I have to test a minimum of 4 times daily (often it's more) as I'm injecting insulin and I have to know where I'm sitting and be able to show my endo my BGL history. I reckon I may become a bit obsessive myself this weekend though as I have to test BGLs every 2 hours for my doc... I'm being closely monitored due to health symptoms.
 

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I think everyone's situation is different... I'm pregnant, and keeping a close eye on my numbers is extremely important for my heath, and my baby's. Too much glucose in the blood stream will affect my placenta and my son.

I do tend to get obsessive, and my husband often gets frustrated, because - let's be honest - glucometers aren't all that accurate. I can test within minutes and my number will be 20-50pts different. That's why I have two glucometers ;) I need to know as soon as possible if my numbers are out of control, so we can take measures to protect my baby.

My doctor isn't as strict about my numbers as I am. He knows they can vary and looks at the whole picture, which is good. I know other moms who have a couple fasting numbers in the 90s (the rest are under 90) and their doc's immediately put them on meds/insulin.

But yeah, I get obsessive, I don't want another 11lb baby :)
 

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hi Dr Kandaswamy :) yep you're right it can become obsessive. But it's important to monitor your own BGLs though to know that you are sitting in safe levels otherwise you're risking hypos and diabetic complications down the track. So people tend to try to get the lowest number they can possibly get to avoid the complications part. But I have an endo who advises your levels need to be 'safe'. the HbA1c helps keeps us in check too... but we are always aiming to improve one our HbA1c test if we didn't get a good result previously. Here in Oz they like HbA1c to be ideally below 7... although they are Ok with it's below 8 (7-8 is a grey area), above 9 they start questioning things further and looking at diet, medicines, etc. I think lately the big push has been on 'preventing' diabetes... so a lot of 'pre-diabetics' being pushed to lower their BGLs to avoid full blown type 2 diabetes.
Personally I have to test a minimum of 4 times daily (often it's more) as I'm injecting insulin and I have to know where I'm sitting and be able to show my endo my BGL history. I reckon I may become a bit obsessive myself this weekend though as I have to test BGLs every 2 hours for my doc... I'm being closely monitored due to health symptoms.
Dear onlymep,
It is necessary to monitor closely if you are on Insulin.
 

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You are welcome to call me obsessive too, but I intend to die free of any diabetic complications like blindness or renal failure.

When the complications are so dire, and the treatment so simple, it always amazes me that some folks think it's no big deal if you run a little high all the time. Just because you can't feel it, doesn't mean the damage isn't being done. Just like hypertension - you can't feel your arteries "hardening" either, but they are nevertheless, and it will kill you if left untreated.

Diabetes is a killer, and my advice is: don't turn your back on it. And don't expect me to "relax" my vigilance any time soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Numbers

I am on tablets only and after having been a diabetic for over 20 years, I have developed an intuitive ability to know when your BGL is going to hypo and then I take a snack and coffee and get over it.
 

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You are welcome to call me obsessive too, but I intend to die free of any diabetic complications like blindness or renal failure.

When the complications are so dire, and the treatment so simple, it always amazes me that some folks think it's no big deal if you run a little high all the time. Just because you can't feel it, doesn't mean the damage isn't being done. Just like hypertension - you can't feel your arteries "hardening" either, but they are nevertheless, and it will kill you if left untreated.

Diabetes is a killer, and my advice is: don't turn your back on it. And don't expect me to "relax" my vigilance any time soon.
Sure. Diabetes is a silent killer.
 

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I am on tablets only and after having been a diabetic for over 20 years, I have developed an intuitive ability to know when your BGL is going to hypo and then I take a snack and coffee and get over it.
Good luck with your intuition, doctor. I'll stick with my meter, thankyouverymuch.
 

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i'll take a day off when Diabetes will
 

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Good luck with your intuition, doctor. I'll stick with my meter, thankyouverymuch.
Yes Shanny and Dr. Kandaswamy, I too would like to stick with my meter. My intuition is very poor. I am unable to sense (without my meter) when my blood glucose levels are above normal. I never go low but my BG does go up to unhealthy levels if I am not careful with what I eat. My BG has gone up to 9 and even 10 mmol/L (162 and 180 mg/dL) but I didn't feel anything abnormal. It was my meter that made me aware of the high BG levels.

I use only Metformin as my diabetes medication. I used to test more than 6 times a day. Now that I have a more or less good idea of what foods and what quantities thereof send my BG above normal, I test only two or three days a week, two or three times those days.

Regards,
Rad
 

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I was just having this conversation at work. One of my co-workers is type 2 and she thinks it okay to be running over 140 all the time. She was taking met and humalog at meals but over Christmas vacation they put her on byetta. She was having better levels but they took her off it yesterday because she was having severe abdominal pain. I told her she should try a long lasting insulin.
 
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Let's face it I think we probably all know at least one diabetic if not more who really doesn't look after themselves. I can think of one I know who is in complete denial and refuses to even visit their endo. They eat all the time and told me recently they'd rather die happy than stressed watching their sugar levels... this is despite me sharing my health issues... that has just added fuel to their theory that looking after yourself doesn't make you feel any better.
But most of us want to prolong our lives and do the right thing by our bodies. If you have access to a glucometer, then it's the best thing to use it on a regular basis to take some control of your situation.
 

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I certainly don't consider myself to be obsessing, but as newly-diagnosed diabetic I need as much information as possible about the BG reactions to foods I eat, activities I engage in, and medications I take.

When I was first diagnosed, I tested 7 times a day. Currently I test 3 to 4 times a day. As my blood sugars get under better control, I'll drop to a couple times a day. Even then I'll likely test more often if I try new foods, or if my Dr decides to change meds, etc.

I can't picture myself EVER testing less than twice a day right now. Knowledge is power, and my health is to important to leave it to guesswork.
 

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I agree with everybody.. :)
It's important to test enough to know that you are in a safe range but I also agree that I was beginning to fuss when my fasting BG was 10 points higher than usual, even though it's well within my target range.
Most of you know that I'm very strict on my diet and my numbers and that's not gonna change, but I've decided to quit stressing every time that fasting number gets up around 120. There's not much I can do to control it and my overall numbers are excellent.
We have to be vigilant and never let down our guard but I think maybe we could cut out a bit of the stressing - particularly about the fasting number since we have so little control over that one.
 

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I am one of the people who would be termed obsessive about my blood glucose testing. I got that way because my diabetes is very unpredictable. What works one day will not work the next day. I also have lost the ability to know when I am hypo. I can be down to 39 (2.2) and have no symptoms at all. Hypo-unawareness is one reason I have the Dexcom CGMS and as most of you know it doesn't come cheap especially when you have no insurance.

I test when I wake up, before and after each meal and at bedtime....and before I get behind the wheel of my vehicle. I feel that driving is a privilege not a right.
 

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I am one of the people who would be termed obsessive about my blood glucose testing. I got that way because my diabetes is very unpredictable. What works one day will not work the next day. I also have lost the ability to know when I am hypo. I can be down to 39 (2.2) and have no symptoms at all. Hypo-unawareness is one reason I have the Dexcom CGMS and as most of you know it doesn't come cheap especially when you have no insurance.

I test when I wake up, before and after each meal and at bedtime....and before I get behind the wheel of my vehicle. I feel that driving is a privilege not a right.
It is really unfortunate if you have lost the capacity to feel the hypo, which is very very crucial in a diabetic's life. You have to be very vigilant and avoid hypo at any cost. Since it will lead to coma and if you are single, nobody will know it, till it is too late.
 

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I am on tablets only and after having been a diabetic for over 20 years, I have developed an intuitive ability to know when your BGL is going to hypo and then I take a snack and coffee and get over it.
Unfortunately that doesn't work for everyone. I have been diabetic now for 30 years (before you figure it out...yes I am admitting in public that I am 46 this month!). Sometimes I can tell if I am high or low...but many times I cant. I have been high and low before that I was unaware of until I tested. The best way to know is to test regularly. I dont intend to have any more complications than I already do...so if that makes me obsessive...then color me crazy! I would rather be obsessed and still in possession of all my feet, toes and kidneys!
 

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I think everyone's situation is different... I'm pregnant, and keeping a close eye on my numbers is extremely important for my heath, and my baby's. Too much glucose in the blood stream will affect my placenta and my son.

I do tend to get obsessive, and my husband often gets frustrated, because - let's be honest - glucometers aren't all that accurate. I can test within minutes and my number will be 20-50pts different. That's why I have two glucometers ;) I need to know as soon as possible if my numbers are out of control, so we can take measures to protect my baby.

My doctor isn't as strict about my numbers as I am. He knows they can vary and looks at the whole picture, which is good. I know other moms who have a couple fasting numbers in the 90s (the rest are under 90) and their doc's immediately put them on meds/insulin.

But yeah, I get obsessive, I don't want another 11lb baby :)
Speaking as a nurse that works in a neonatal intensive care unit....*thank you* for being strict about your numbers. High blood sugar causes so much more damage to your baby than many people realize. Yes, it makes them big, and they can have problems regulating their own blood sugar for a little while after birth...but the real damage is what it can do to their heart. The closer mom's blood sugar is to normal, the better it is for baby. Your baby, and your baby's heart thanks you also :)
 

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Unfortunately that doesn't work for everyone. I have been diabetic now for 30 years (before you figure it out...yes I am admitting in public that I am 46 this month!). Sometimes I can tell if I am high or low...but many times I cant. I have been high and low before that I was unaware of until I tested. The best way to know is to test regularly. I dont intend to have any more complications than I already do...so if that makes me obsessive...then color me crazy! I would rather be obsessed and still in possession of all my feet, toes and kidneys!
Sure with your numbers, you need to be more vigilant. But the present A1c is under limit and you have to continue your course.
 

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I certainly don't consider myself to be obsessing, but as newly-diagnosed diabetic I need as much information as possible about the BG reactions to foods I eat, activities I engage in, and medications I take.

When I was first diagnosed, I tested 7 times a day. Currently I test 3 to 4 times a day. As my blood sugars get under better control, I'll drop to a couple times a day. Even then I'll likely test more often if I try new foods, or if my Dr decides to change meds, etc.

I can't picture myself EVER testing less than twice a day right now. Knowledge is power, and my health is to important to leave it to guesswork.
I totally agree with you. I was diagnosed last month and I am trying to understand how I can control sugar, so my only way to know it, is testing!

I have a good example from today: I have measured 2 hours after lunch and my blood sugar was 120. After one hour riding with my bike, I tested again: 150.

I was very upset on how could my blood sugar increased after exercices and then I remember that I had a "gatorade" while riding. Stupid me...
 
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