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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, last week (or so) I posted that I am a newly diagnosed diabetic with a fasting BSL of 127. Today I saw my doctor and here's what he said.

He put me on Janumet 50/500. He said that it is not insulin, does not cause side effects, and is a lifetime commitment. Okay, I'll do it, of course. He said I would not have to worry about testing 3-4 times a day and that I can test a couple of times a week and that'd be okay. He said I would not experience the highs and lows you guys have mentioned, that I don't have to carry around a snack for lows and that, in general, life will be normal on this med.

I committed to seeing a dietician and to getting an A1c test in three-four months and then blood testing three of four times a year thereafter.

My questions for you experts is does this sound like the usual plan and does what he says about highs and lows sound about right? My plan is to continue to eat low carb, low GI carbs, and continue to exercise, take the meds and NOT WORRY ABOUT COMPLICATIONS.

Thoughts, please? Thanks so much.
 

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So, last week (or so) I posted that I am a newly diagnosed diabetic with a fasting BSL of 127. Today I saw my doctor and here's what he said.

He put me on Janumet 50/500. He said that it is not insulin, does not cause side effects, and is a lifetime commitment. Okay, I'll do it, of course. He said I would not have to worry about testing 3-4 times a day and that I can test a couple of times a week and that'd be okay. He said I would not experience the highs and lows you guys have mentioned, that I don't have to carry around a snack for lows and that, in general, life will be normal on this med.

I committed to seeing a dietician and to getting an A1c test in three-four months and then blood testing three of four times a year thereafter.

My questions for you experts is does this sound like the usual plan and does what he says about highs and lows sound about right? My plan is to continue to eat low carb, low GI carbs, and continue to exercise, take the meds and NOT WORRY ABOUT COMPLICATIONS.

Thoughts, please? Thanks so much.
Ken, when I was diagnosed 10 years ago, my fasting blood sugar was 126. I was put on pills and told to watch my carbs and to exercise and was told to test 3-4 times per week. That was fine for 5 years. I then started having blurry vision and headaches. Since I was only testing 3-4times per week, I was missing the readings above 300. I needed to go on insulin. My pancreas wasn't working well. This is what happened to me and I do have some minor complications. Everyone is different, so you may never have any complications as long as you eat well and exercise. But diabetes is a progressive disease and anything can happen.
 

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So, last week (or so) I posted that I am a newly diagnosed diabetic with a fasting BSL of 127. Today I saw my doctor and here's what he said.

He put me on Janumet 50/500. He said that it is not insulin, does not cause side effects, and is a lifetime commitment. Okay, I'll do it, of course. He said I would not have to worry about testing 3-4 times a day and that I can test a couple of times a week and that'd be okay. He said I would not experience the highs and lows you guys have mentioned, that I don't have to carry around a snack for lows and that, in general, life will be normal on this med.

I committed to seeing a dietician and to getting an A1c test in three-four months and then blood testing three of four times a year thereafter.

My questions for you experts is does this sound like the usual plan and does what he says about highs and lows sound about right? My plan is to continue to eat low carb, low GI carbs, and continue to exercise, take the meds and NOT WORRY ABOUT COMPLICATIONS.

Thoughts, please? Thanks so much.
The drug you are taking is a combination of Januvia and Metformin. They are not likely to cause low blood sugar unless taken with a sulfonyurea or insulin since neither one of those drugs directly stimulates the pancreas. Metformin can cause some GI upset....but the bloating, gas and diarrhea does eventually go away as your body adjusts to it.

I absolutely agree that to continue to eat a low carb diet and get regular exercise is a good idea. Keep track of your A1c as recommended and absolutely keep your appointment with a dietitian. I might would test a little more often that that, but thats just me...I like to know whats going on in my body as much as possible.

I dont think you can ever not worry about complication. Remember, type 2 diabetes is a serious thing. Many T2's start out with a med or two and coast along happily in the dark for years until they realize that all of a sudden they are out of control. T2 is a progressive disease. Some people manage their whole lives on diet and exercise with maybe an oral med or two. Some T2's no matter how diligent they are in management eventually will require insulin therapy. It isnt anything they did wrong....it is simply a failing pancreas. I am a T2 diabetic that was controlled on oral meds for a long time. My pancreas has now gotten to the point that it is barely producing any insulin anymore. The beta cells just give out eventually. So, you still need to be mindful of it and monitor yourself as your doctor suggests.
 

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I agree with Breeze & Pam . . . and I think if I were you, I'd at least take a fasting test each morning before you eat anything. I was diagnosed with a fasting of 130, and am still controlled with metformin and quite a low carb diet - much lower carb than advised by my doc. If in the beginning you would have more peace of mind testing more often, go ahead and test. It will give you an idea of which foods you can tolerate & which ones send your BG into a tailspin.

It is serious and it's progressive. So just don't turn your back on it, Ken! And we're always here whenever you need us!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, again, for the replies...my new buddies. Breeze, thanks for the PM, I woulda answered but I haven't figured out how to PM yet.

I hear you guys. I really do. And I am not being argumentative but I don't get the testing thing. What am I looking for? I mean, obviously, the right number can be reassuring. But, what happens when there is a wrong number? I don't follow the scenario. If my GL goes high, do I call the doctor? Panic? Jump on the treadmill and exercise? Take more medicine? Really, I am not arguing the point, I just need it explained a little further.

I get that the disease is incurable and progressive. I'm done with sweets and white bread. I know that. But, what useful information do I gainfrom semi-constant testing other than things to tell my doc next time I visit him?

As always, thanks.
 

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Thanks, again, for the replies...my new buddies. Breeze, thanks for the PM, I woulda answered but I haven't figured out how to PM yet.

I hear you guys. I really do. And I am not being argumentative but I don't get the testing thing. What am I looking for? I mean, obviously, the right number can be reassuring. But, what happens when there is a wrong number? I don't follow the scenario. If my GL goes high, do I call the doctor? Panic? Jump on the treadmill and exercise? Take more medicine? Really, I am not arguing the point, I just need it explained a little further.

I get that the disease is incurable and progressive. I'm done with sweets and white bread. I know that. But, what useful information do I gainfrom semi-constant testing other than things to tell my doc next time I visit him?

As always, thanks.
No need to panic about it. Even a very high number isnt going kill you right away :) BUt if you are consistently running high, then you risk doing a lot of damage to your body and that is something your doctor will need to know in order to adjust your meds. You will also be able to tell if there are some foods that consistently make your blood sugar high and you will know to avoid them. Being on the particular meds that you are on, it wouldn't do any good to take extra....your med doesn't work that way.
 

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For me the testing lets me know what to eat. When I was first diagnosed, my doctor started me on metformin & told me to keep carbs under 100g per day. I struggled for several months, and he even increased my metformin to try and get my levels down under 140. (140 is the level where studies have shown organ damage begins to occur from too much glucose in our blood).

Finally I began to eliminate more carbs from my diet. I avoid all the "white" foods like pasta, rice, bread, potatoes . . . anything made with white flour and/or white sugar. But even when I switched to whole grains, it wasn't dropping.

I now keep my carbs at about 50-60g per day, because that's what it takes for me to maintain blood levels of 80-130, which is my target range. It isn't quite as low as a non-diabetic person would register, but it's low enough that it shouldn't do damage to my eyes, kidneys, circulatory system, etc.

But unless I test, I don't know that a tuna sandwich on whole grain bread is spiking me up to 180. Or that one slice of pizza spikes me up to 190 and even keeps me hanging there for three hours! And if I don't know it, I'll prob'ly keep eating it, because it seems like it would be okay - tuna is good protein, and most of the experts say we diabetics are fine with whole grain products. But many of us are NOT fine. And we only know that because we test. So unless your doctor is a diabetic himself, you'll have to take some of his advice with a grain of salt.

I don't test as much now as I did at the beginning because I now KNOW what foods cause elevated levels and I simply don't eat them. But until you get a handle on it, I usually say as Breeze does: test, test, test!

It isn't just a reassurance - it's something you have control over. If a bowl of Wheaties every morning sends your sugars over the moon every morning, then you prob'ly shouldn't EAT a bowl of Wheaties every morning. Eat some bacon & eggs instead - that won't budge your sugars! :D Protein & fats are a diabetic's friends - carbs are not. So by testing, you can strike a balance and keep your levels in a safe range. No dietitian or doctor can decide this for you - it's something you learn by testing.
 

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If I had known better, I would have tested at least once a day. I think your fasting number is important. Also like Pam & Shanny said you might want to find out what foods increase your blood sugar and avoid the foods that keep you above 180 for hours. ADA suggests that you keep your post meal blood sugar between 140-180. I try and keep my post meal at 120, but I have insulin to help me achieve this.

Until you have made a certain number of posts you are not able to PM. Once you are able to PM, go to the members name and click on it and it will take you to the members profile. Go to messages and click on send a private message, it will give you a box to type in. I am telling you this from memory and I usually PM so fast, that I may have missed a step. The next time I PM someone, I will write it down and I will send you a message on the method. :)

You seem to be serious about controlling your diabetes and this is very important. Good luck!
 
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