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I have had type 2 diabetes since 1990, and am under pretty good control. My reason for seeking help here is because my 17 year old daughter has type 1 and was diagnosed in May of 2007 and is still having alot of issues with control which causes us to fight alot and I am needing to know if anyone else out there is struggling with this. I am sending her to college next year and fear the worst. There is nothing I can do to make her see what this is doing to her, she is very active, has always played sports, i just can't get her to check it and take her insilin and control like she should . She takes Lantus at night, we are up to 24 units, and Nololog for anytime she eats carbs, and her ratio is 1 unit for every 5 carbs. The first year was all good cause she was still on her "honeymoon" stage but now she has 300's , 400's, 200's, and then every now and then you get a 100 or so. she is all over the place and there is nothing I can do!!
 

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Welcome to DF, And the Type 1 is a difficult to deal with as the understanding of what carbs can be delt with and balence it with insulin.

I would see that your daughter as some fast carbs within easy reach as she is in an activity that can make her faint. I see that you have a ratio that can be calculated and that's a real good thing. Have a better understanding about carbs and tell her to enjoy the sport. Exercise is very important. ;)
 

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As I mentioned in my reply in the other forum, complications will be likely to develop and then your daughter will be frightened enough that she will begin taking proper care of herself. If she develops good control very soon after the complications begin then the problems are very likely to disappear and she would be OK. Diabetics who ignore their diabetes and never try getting good control have terrible complicarions that never reverse themselves. Blindness, kidney failure and amputations can result. I don't think any of these things will happen to your daughter because she is going to take good care of herself so she can go to college and safely take part in sports and make good grades.

Richard
 

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As a teenager, it is hard to accept that she is doomed for medications for the rest of her life, so this sort of reaction is completely normal. Her interest in sports will go a long way in controlling her diabetes, but as long as she stays on the high-carb diet, complications will eventually occur. It is at that time that she will be more willing to think about the options that are available to her. The truth is, you don't have to take medications forever. There are other options.
 

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... she will be more willing to think about the options that are available to her. The truth is, you don't have to take medications forever. There are other options.
As Richard explained in another thread, people with type 1 diabetes, as jcooney's daughter has, will always need insulin. Any option that includes discontinuing insulin is NOT an option for a type 1 diabetic.
 

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As Richard explained in another thread, people with type 1 diabetes, as jcooney's daughter has, will always need insulin. Any option that includes discontinuing insulin is NOT an option for a type 1 diabetic.
It actually is possible for a previously type 1 diabetic to recover, and start producing insulin. I understand that you have gone through many years being assured that there is no way to survive without it, but there are options. While it is hardly common for type 1 diabetics to recover, and it takes much more work than type 2 diabetics.. it has been done by others, and it can be done by your daughter.

Of course you don't have to believe me, but there really is information out there that can help, and provide hope. :)
 

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Sarah, you may be referring to Dr Fuhrman's healthy diet way of recersing Type 1, to a certain extent. Here is a part of his blog:

Live a Long and Healthy Life with Type 1 Diabetes

"Type 1 diabetics need not feel doomed to a life of medical disasters and a possible early death. With a truly health-supporting lifestyle, including real food designed by nature, even the Type 1 (childhood onset) diabetic can have the same potential for a long, disease-free life, like the rest of us. I find that when Type 1 diabetics adopt a high-nutrient, dietary approach, they can lower their insulin requirements by about half. They protect their body against the heart-attack, promoting effects of the American diet style. They no longer have swings of highs and lows, and their glucose levels and lipids stay under excellent control. Even though the Type 1 diabetic will still require exogenous (external) insulin, but by following my Eat To Live diet-style, they will no longer need excessive amounts of it."

So there is no cure here, and only a partial reversal. The patient has NOT started producing insulin again. That is not possible in a Type 1 diabetic. Please do NOT say a Type 1 can start producing insulin again!!!

I experienced a reversal after starting pumping and reducing my daily carb intake. I am taking 40% less insulin than before, but I will never be cured. My C-peptide is less than 0.1 so my body does not produce insulin.
 

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It actually is possible for a previously type 1 diabetic to recover, and start producing insulin. I understand that you have gone through many years being assured that there is no way to survive without it, but there are options. While it is hardly common for type 1 diabetics to recover, and it takes much more work than type 2 diabetics.. it has been done by others, and it can be done by your daughter.

Of course you don't have to believe me, but there really is information out there that can help, and provide hope. :)
I would be willing to believe you if the work you refer to is a pancreas transplant, because for a type 1 patient whose pancreas produces no insulin whatsoever, transplant is the only other alternative.

I repeat Richard's quote of Dr. Fuhrman:
the Type 1 diabetic will still require exogenous (external) insulin, but by following my Eat To Live diet-style, they will no longer need excessive amounts of it.
 

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As a teenager, it is hard to accept that she is doomed for medications for the rest of her life, so this sort of reaction is completely normal. Her interest in sports will go a long way in controlling her diabetes, but as long as she stays on the high-carb diet, complications will eventually occur. It is at that time that she will be more willing to think about the options that are available to her. The truth is, you don't have to take medications forever. There are other options.
i find exercise is great releasing endorphins to stop you getting depressed over it :O
 

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Jcooney, I was diagnosed with type 1 when I was a teenageer and for a while, I just didn't want to think about it. I would refuse to measure my glucose when my parents weren't around, and it would take about 15 minuites before I would let my Dad anywhere near me with a needle (I wasn't ready to inject myself). I think it was part of the 'wanting to be like everyone else and not have something that makes me different.'

I'm still struggling with my levels which are higher than I would like them to be, and I've been a diabetic for 10 years now. I have anxieties which don't help, and have the beginning of a complication from my bad control in my stomach.

I'm sure she will come around and realise that she has to be a bit stricter with herself - I did/am! Does she have any friends her age who have diabetes? That's one of the hardest things, not having someone who is your age and understands. Finding her a friend maybe who has good control could be an inspiration for her. I've met people who have good control, and I strive to get good results because of them. If they can do it, so can I!

stripes
 

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Excellent advice, Stripes!
 

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I have had type 2 diabetes since 1990, and am under pretty good control. My reason for seeking help here is because my 17 year old daughter has type 1 and was diagnosed in May of 2007 and is still having alot of issues with control which causes us to fight alot and I am needing to know if anyone else out there is struggling with this. I am sending her to college next year and fear the worst. There is nothing I can do to make her see what this is doing to her, she is very active, has always played sports, i just can't get her to check it and take her insilin and control like she should . She takes Lantus at night, we are up to 24 units, and Nololog for anytime she eats carbs, and her ratio is 1 unit for every 5 carbs. The first year was all good cause she was still on her "honeymoon" stage but now she has 300's , 400's, 200's, and then every now and then you get a 100 or so. she is all over the place and there is nothing I can do!!
Hi and I am sorry your daughter is having a rough time. I am not going to preach at you about this but it looks like your daughter could be facing some insulin resistant issues with her diabetes which is common in teens. I would talk with her doctor about seeing a diabetes counselor or even attending diabetes camp, etc. Teens want to be like their friends so she just wants to be normal to her which means not having to deal with diabetes at all. Maybe you could offer to take over her care when she is at home to give her a break. See what she thinks about the idea. It's just a suggestion. Wishing you the best.
 

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Sarah, you may be referring to Dr Fuhrman's healthy diet way of recersing Type 1, to a certain extent. Here is a part of his blog:

Live a Long and Healthy Life with Type 1 Diabetes

"Type 1 diabetics need not feel doomed to a life of medical disasters and a possible early death. With a truly health-supporting lifestyle, including real food designed by nature, even the Type 1 (childhood onset) diabetic can have the same potential for a long, disease-free life, like the rest of us. I find that when Type 1 diabetics adopt a high-nutrient, dietary approach, they can lower their insulin requirements by about half. They protect their body against the heart-attack, promoting effects of the American diet style. They no longer have swings of highs and lows, and their glucose levels and lipids stay under excellent control. Even though the Type 1 diabetic will still require exogenous (external) insulin, but by following my Eat To Live diet-style, they will no longer need excessive amounts of it."

So there is no cure here, and only a partial reversal. The patient has NOT started producing insulin again. That is not possible in a Type 1 diabetic. Please do NOT say a Type 1 can start producing insulin again!!!

I experienced a reversal after starting pumping and reducing my daily carb intake. I am taking 40% less insulin than before, but I will never be cured. My C-peptide is less than 0.1 so my body does not produce insulin.
I agree with you Richard. The only time I have seen a person with type 1 stop using insulin is because they have had a successful pancreas transplant, they are in the honeymoon period or they were type 2 misdiagnosed as a type 1.
 

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I have had type 2 diabetes since 1990, and am under pretty good control. My reason for seeking help here is because my 17 year old daughter has type 1 and was diagnosed in May of 2007 and is still having alot of issues with control which causes us to fight alot and I am needing to know if anyone else out there is struggling with this. I am sending her to college next year and fear the worst. There is nothing I can do to make her see what this is doing to her, she is very active, has always played sports, i just can't get her to check it and take her insilin and control like she should . She takes Lantus at night, we are up to 24 units, and Nololog for anytime she eats carbs, and her ratio is 1 unit for every 5 carbs. The first year was all good cause she was still on her "honeymoon" stage but now she has 300's , 400's, 200's, and then every now and then you get a 100 or so. she is all over the place and there is nothing I can do!!

Try to have a serious conversation with her about it...it's her life that's at stake for God's sake!
 

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yeah you will be insane soon, im sure i made both of my parents insane. im 21 had diabetes since 3. you just gotta let her know to check it and make sure she knows her symptoms of lows EXTREMELY WELL, i should check more and i am working on it, but i at least know extremely well if im low or high and can take care of myself well. also talk to her about a pump, it will make her and your life so much easier....did for me at least!!!
 
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