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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it possible to become insulin resistant following a low carb diet? I keep my carbs below 50g about 5-6 days a week usually but I allow myself 1-2 days where I eat regularly consisting of about 100-150g of carbs. However I have high BG readings ranging from 220-270 even with extra insulin on those 2 days. They go back to normal when I go back to my low carb days.

What gives? :confused:
 

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I've been doing some version of low carb for 4 years. I do find that I am more sensitive to carbs especially the processed ones. I'm not sure the reason but suspect it is probably has to do with what the body expects. If you always eat 50 carbs and then all of a sudden triple the amount your body is overwhelmed. This is why they tell you that you need to develop a Way of Eating for life.
 

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I know you mentioned in your introduction thread that you're a type-I, but is it also possible you're insulin-resistant?

That would certainly explain higher BG readings during your higher carb days.

Either that of you don't have your bolus dosage quite right.

Either way, it would REALLY be best if you ate consistently as much as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've been doing some version of low carb for 4 years. I do find that I am more sensitive to carbs especially the processed ones. I'm not sure the reason but suspect it is probably has to do with what the body expects. If you always eat 50 carbs and then all of a sudden triple the amount your body is overwhelmed. This is why they tell you that you need to develop a Way of Eating for life.
I know that eating low carb eventually depletes your glycogen storage. Which is why I have a couple of high carb days to replenish it. I'm doing this primarily to shed excess fat. It's working pretty good so far.

I know you mentioned in your introduction thread that you're a type-I, but is it also possible you're insulin-resistant?

That would certainly explain higher BG readings during your higher carb days.

Either that of you don't have your bolus dosage quite right.

Either way, it would REALLY be best if you ate consistently as much as possible.
See I don't think I'm insulin resistant. I didn't have trouble regulating my bg levels until I started these diet/workout routines. I just started the low carb diet about 3 weeks ago and started seeing this trend. For the most part, 80% of the time it's good. But there are times like this that I can't explain why my levels won't stay balanced.
 

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I find for me when I do low carb, I have to stay low carb. If I do an occasional high carb day my bgs tend to explode and stay high for 4-5 days. The way a low carb diet works is it puts you into ketosis to burn fat for energy. I think if you have your occasional cheat diets you really mess with your endocrine system. I need to keep my glycogen stores depleted otherwise I tend to get frequent liver dumps when I am not eating. Some type 1's are insulin resistant and need to be on metformin or a similar drug along with the insulin. As a Insulin resistant type 2 the only way I can keep my bgs below 100 most of the day is low carb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I find for me when I do low carb, I have to stay low carb. If I do an occasional high carb day my bgs tend to explode and stay high for 4-5 days. The way a low carb diet works is it puts you into ketosis to burn fat for energy. I think if you have your occasional cheat diets you really mess with your endocrine system. I need to keep my glycogen stores depleted otherwise I tend to get frequent liver dumps when I am not eating. Some type 1's are insulin resistant and need to be on metformin or a similar drug along with the insulin. As a Insulin resistant type 2 the only way I can keep my bgs below 100 most of the day is low carb.
Ahh I see. Well I'm glad to read that I'm not the only one. I guess that's just how it is then huh.
 

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Even though you're type 1, the insulin resistance can raise its ugly head with weight gain. You don't say how much you're trying to lose, but even getting it all off might not reverse the IR . . . it has a nasty way of hanging on after the weight is gone. Fortunately, the metformin jwags mentioned is a very good tool for IR, and many type 1s use it along with insulin.
 

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Dallas, I am type 1 for 65 years, and became insulin resistant in the 1990s due to weight gain. I am currently using Metformin along with my insulin, and have very good control.

What is your insulin:carb ratio? Mine is 1:7, which means I need one unit of bolus insulin for every 7 carbs I eat. A type 1 diabetic who is NOT insulin resistant, would use a ratio like 1:15 or 1:20, etc. If your ratio is more like mine, then it is likely that you have some insulin resistance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dallas, I am type 1 for 65 years, and became insulin resistant in the 1990s due to weight gain. I am currently using Metformin along with my insulin, and have very good control.

What is your insulin:carb ratio? Mine is 1:7, which means I need one unit of bolus insulin for every 7 carbs I eat. A type 1 diabetic who is NOT insulin resistant, would use a ratio like 1:15 or 1:20, etc. If your ratio is more like mine, then it is likely that you have some insulin resistance.
Mine is actually 1:15 with moderate control. There are some days when I have to do 1:20. I don't think I'm insulin resistant. I was just curious if one can become IR temporarily.
 
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