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hello,
i am new to all of this so please excuse me if i dont explain everything in the correct way.

I recently started experiencing extreme foot pain, i guess it would be called "burning foot", so i got my fasting glucose test done and the numbers i got were: glucose 107H, the hemoglobin A1c was 5.5. I went over these with my doctor and he said they numbers are high, but that i am not diabetic. He didn't seem to think the pain was connected to blood sugar. I don't remember a conversation about whether i am prediabetic, but i believe i am.

My question is: can i be getting the burning foot symptoms with these numbers? I am a 65 yr old male, that is pretty active, i rarely eat meat, I walk constantly, i don't drink at all. I swam 3x a week until the pool was closed due to the pandemic. I have recently reduced my carb intake and I see some improvement, which just confirms my idea that the foot pain is indeed connected to blood sugar.

Does any of this make any sense to anyone? i am seeing my foot doctor next week.
 

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Hi Tfalk, welcome to the forum.

I'm not a doctor and don't work in the medical profession and can only state my personal opinion.

First, it is really hard to tell what might be going on with just one shot BG numbers. A 107 is considered higher than normal for a fasting number, but it is not that high and shouldn't be the cause of neuropathy pains.. Normal should be less than 100, but there are many many things that could cause that being over and that are not related to diabetes. As far as the A1c, the American Diabetes Association classifies pre-diabetes as having an A1c between 5.7% and 6.5%, and classifies diabetes as greater than 6.5%. Having a 5.5% A1c equates to an average daily BG of around a 112 mg/dL Being that an average can be derived from a wide array of potential numbers, a 112 average can be gotten from BG ranging from 102 to 122 or BG ranging from 70 to 154. Studies have found that BG being over 140 can slowly, over time, cause nerve damage, neuropathy could be a symptom of that damage. So IMO, no it doesn't make sense, but yes it could. I think more follow up is needed, and you are already doing that by seeing the foot doctor.

Have you been disgnosed as pre-diabetic? It sounds like you need to get a meter and check you BG during the day if you are not already doing so. Best times to check would be soon after when you first wake up, before eating a meal, then a couple of hours after eating, instead of just random testing. Usually it takes about 2 hours to hit the peak in BG after eating, but that can vary depending on what you have eaten. This may give you an idea of what numbers are making up your A1c value.

Have you any testing done to determine if there are any vitamin B deficiencies if you are not supplementing? Just asking because of the "rarely eat meat"

Looking forward to hearing more from you. Let us know how your foot doctor appointment goes.
 
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Hello, Tfalk. Let me join mbuster in welcoming you to this forum!

I think you described your situation clearly. mbuster provided a lot of good information. I'm curious if there's a specific reason you had a fasting blood glucose test done. Family history? Being 65? Are you experiencing other symptoms of diabetes? Do you have other risk factors for diabetes?

There are many causes for peripheral neuropathy; diabetes is a common one but, by far, not the only one. Here is the Mayo Clinic list of causes for leg neuropathy; here is WebMD's. Do any of those other causes fit you?

Please take a look at these pages and let us know what your foot doctor has to say. We should be able to offer you better suggestions after that.
 

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Six years ago I was diagnosed with sensory-motor polyneuropathy after having problems moving my legs. Many of my doctors were perplexed until my GP ordered two nerve tests, an EMG and a NCV test. Again, I'm not a doctor, but this is the only way I'm aware of to prove one way or the other if you have nerve damage. To date I have not had the burning foot problems you're experiencing, but I do get a tingling and numbness at times. After an appointment with a Neurologist, she prescribed Gabapentin which, after finding the correct dosage, has proved to be a life saver for me. I went from not walking without the aid of a cane to being able to walk close to normal once again. I hope you find an answer to the problems you're having.
 

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One medication often used for Diabetic neuropathic complications is Gabapentin. It may also work if the symptoms are caused by some other condition. Of course, ask your doctor about it. Your results may vary.

I will mention some other potential relief. One is to deliberately keep the thermostat at a lower temperature, and let your feet stick out from under the covers. Adding a small fan aimed at your feet will also help.

One final idea is to sew a special sort of sock. Sew a pocket to hold a gel pack on the bottom of the sock. Store the gel pack in the refrigerator, and insert into the pocket before you go to bed. It won't stay cold all night, but perhaps for long enough to get to sleep. You could have two sets of gel packs, so that you have the option of swapping out to a fresh one if needed.

One more thing I've thought about. Neuropathy tends to get worse over time. And in this case, it may be desirable for it to get worse... that is because numbness may be preferable to the ongoing issue of the burning, allodynia, and other uncomfortable sensations. So, I wonder if not being so strict about your blood sugar may result in a quicker resolution of this side effect. But, of course, getting worse, will mean other complications get worse elsewhere in your body. But nightly torture can be so bad sometimes, that such actions are desirable. One wonders if having nerves severed are another possible solution.
 

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Dcad, thank you for such a comprehensive, helpful post!
 

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I agree with most of what you say and can vouch that gabapentin does help with other nerve pains. My wife is pain free on gabapentin for SI joint issues that she was getting steroid injections and even tried burning the nerves for longer relief. Both were hit or miss in giving relief.

I know of several past post in the forum of members stating by keeping their BG below 120 has resolved their diabetic neuropathy. Just like the damage, the healing is not overnight it take a while and persistence. If started before too much damage has been done, it is reversible. I understand the thought on letting the numbness set in, but the higher BG is doing more than just wreaking havoc on your nerves. To me its not worth the gamble that I could let it go long enough to only come out with numb feet and not periphrial artery disease or renal failure, etc., especially if I could reverse the issue with better BG management.

It is a shame that the medical profession doesn't give more detailed information to newly diagnosed diabetics on managing BG and what damages can and will happen if not managed. I guess if they knew that diabetes complications are not inevitable if we control our BG.
 

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hello,
i am new to all of this so please excuse me if i dont explain everything in the correct way.

I recently started experiencing extreme foot pain, i guess it would be called "burning foot", so i got my fasting glucose test done and the numbers i got were: glucose 107H, the hemoglobin A1c was 5.5. I went over these with my doctor and he said they numbers are high, but that i am not diabetic. He didn't seem to think the pain was connected to blood sugar. I don't remember a conversation about whether i am prediabetic, but i believe i am.

My question is: can i be getting the burning foot symptoms with these numbers? I am a 65 yr old male, that is pretty active, i rarely eat meat, I walk constantly, i don't drink at all. I swam 3x a week until the pool was closed due to the pandemic. I have recently reduced my carb intake and I see some improvement, which just confirms my idea that the foot pain is indeed connected to blood sugar.

Does any of this make any sense to anyone? i am seeing my foot doctor next week.
Hi, I suggest you seek another doctor for a second opinion, or a physical therapist can determine the paresthesia :)
 

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Some people claim to get some neuropathy pain relief from taking Benfotiamine, a lipid soluble derivative of Vitamin B1. There have been several mentions in threads over the years here on the forum.
 
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