The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last year I was diagnosed as prediabetic. My fasting glucose was 111, and my A1C was 5.8. By drastically changing my diet, I've gotten my fasting glucose between 89-99, which is good. But my A1C is what concerns me. Initially I got it down to 5.7, but it's now 5.9, and I'm not doing anything differently than I was before when all of this nonsense started. I am very conscientious about what I eat: I know about portion control and counting carbs, and I walk at least a mile five days a week. I don't understand why my A1C would only go down one-tenth of a percentage point after I made such drastic changes to my diet, and why it's gone up now. I'm 4ft. 10in. and used to weigh 90 lbs., which was fine for me. But since all of this started, I'm down to 80 lbs., which is NOT good! I certainly didn't need or want to lose weight, and I can't seem to gain any of it back by eating this way. All of my other blood tests are fine, but diabetes runs in my family; so I expect to get it regardless of what I do. But I want to know that I'm doing all I can to stave it off for as long as I possibly can. I've come to this forum for help and support. Thank you for reading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
Hello wordmaven, and welcome. It seems you're in a pretty good place, actually. Many people do strive for a very low A1c, but my doc says anything under 6 is fine.

If you're losing weight you don't need to lose, then regardless of how conscientious you are with your meals, you DO need to adjust your menus to include a few more calories to arrest the weight loss.

It may be nothing more than including a little more fat with your protein. The low-fat campaign of recent years has been proven to be a fallacy - it doesn't prevent heart disease, and replacing fats with carbs in so many low-fat products makes them unhealthy for all of the diabetics and pre-diabetics of the world.

Perhaps you could give us some idea of what your meals consist of, and there may be people here who have remedied problems similar to yours. Losing 12% of your body weight is a huge loss when you're under 100# to start with! But you don't need carbs to gain weight - there are better ways for us "glucose-challenged" ones.

If you don't have a meter, you might consider getting one. That would enable you to track your blood sugars after meals, as well as fasting. Postprandial spikes could be affecting your A1c more than you realize.

Thank you for joining us - please take care and hurry back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
Like Shanny mentioned, you need to get a glucose meter if you don't have one. Your A1C is averaging your blood sugar over a 3 month time span. My last A1C was 5.2% and I know that I had many lows. You need to test to see if your post meal blood sugar is higher than normal.
Welcome to the forum, hope that you will visit often!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both for your replies. Shanny, my doctor also says that an A1C under 6 is okay; but while my 5.9 is under 6, it isn't by much! I'm very unsettled with it being so high. I'm actually beginning to wonder, though, about the validity of this A1C for measuring sugar in the blood: When I was first diagnosed as prediabetic, my A1C was 5.8; but even after cutting out regular sodas, pasta, all junk food and sweets, etc., etc., my A1C only went down to 5.7. I don't understand how making such drastic changes in my diet could only result in a one-tenth of a percentage point drop. And now, it's gone up by two-tenths of a point, and I'm eating no differently than I was at the beginning of all of this. Breezeonby, I see you're on a TON of medicine, so I'm guessing that's how you have an A1C of 5.2. That's terrific, and more power to you!

I don't cook, so eating frozen dinners (Lean Cuisine, Healthy Choice, etc.) and getting food from outside are probably not helping matters any. I do, though, read the labels on the dinners and only choose dinners that have fewer than 45 carbs. For breakfast, which I only eat when I'm home in the morning, I'll eat Wheaties, a few slices of cheese, and a serving of fruit. I use the exchange lists from the ADA to determine what a serving of fruit is; and Amazon sells packages of single-serving cups of Wheaties, Cheerios, and Total. Or I'll substitute a whole-wheat mini bagel for the cereal. I eat eggs, too.

The nutritionist I went to suggested I add nuts to my daily diet, and two Extend or Glucerna snacks each day, in order to give me some more calories and curb my very serious cravings for sweets. I've been afraid to eat these bars, though, because I don't trust what the manufacturers say about their being good for diabetics. Can anyone comment on their usage of these snacks and how they affect blood sugar? I'd very much like to eat them but feel I could be potentially causing myself more problems in the end, and I can't afford to move things along faster than necessary, if you know what I mean! If anyone can comment on the usage of these snacks, I'd greatly appreciate it, as they each have a good amount of calories, which is what I desperately need!

Thank you for your responses. I'm so glad I found this forum!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
Thank you both for your replies. Shanny, my doctor also says that an A1C under 6 is okay; but while my 5.9 is under 6, it isn't by much! I'm very unsettled with it being so high. I'm actually beginning to wonder, though, about the validity of this A1C for measuring sugar in the blood: When I was first diagnosed as prediabetic, my A1C was 5.8; but even after cutting out regular sodas, pasta, all junk food and sweets, etc., etc., my A1C only went down to 5.7. I don't understand how making such drastic changes in my diet could only result in a one-tenth of a percentage point drop. And now, it's gone up by two-tenths of a point, and I'm eating no differently than I was at the beginning of all of this. Breezeonby, I see you're on a TON of medicine, so I'm guessing that's how you have an A1C of 5.2. That's terrific, and more power to you!

I don't cook, so eating frozen dinners (Lean Cuisine, Healthy Choice, etc.) and getting food from outside are probably not helping matters any. I do, though, read the labels on the dinners and only choose dinners that have fewer than 45 carbs. For breakfast, which I only eat when I'm home in the morning, I'll eat Wheaties, a few slices of cheese, and a serving of fruit. I use the exchange lists from the ADA to determine what a serving of fruit is; and Amazon sells packages of single-serving cups of Wheaties, Cheerios, and Total. Or I'll substitute a whole-wheat mini bagel for the cereal. I eat eggs, too.

The nutritionist I went to suggested I add nuts to my daily diet, and two Extend or Glucerna snacks each day, in order to give me some more calories and curb my very serious cravings for sweets. I've been afraid to eat these bars, though, because I don't trust what the manufacturers say about their being good for diabetics. Can anyone comment on their usage of these snacks and how they affect blood sugar? I'd very much like to eat them but feel I could be potentially causing myself more problems in the end, and I can't afford to move things along faster than necessary, if you know what I mean! If anyone can comment on the usage of these snacks, I'd greatly appreciate it, as they each have a good amount of calories, which is what I desperately need!

Thank you for your responses. I'm so glad I found this forum!
You are right, I do take a TON of medication. My diabetes has progressed since my diagnosis to the point where I need insulin to keep it under control. We are all different and some need more help than others. I have tried both Glucerna and Extend bars and there is nothing special about them, they both contain carbs. And Glucerna contains maltodextrin which can cause a blood sugar spike in some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
Wordmaven? I think you're being ambushed by some of the foods you're using, which contain fast-acting carbs that can have a really bad effect on your overall blood sugar levels. If you can get a meter as soon as possible, and get started testing after you've eaten all this cereal or a bagel or even the Lean Cuisine/Healthy Choice meals, you may find that you're spiking after you eat these, and those spikes are what is driving up your A1c. The ADA guidelines are notoriously lenient and misleading for people who come into diabetes with no previous knowledge of the food pyramid. What they should be teaching is how to eat to your meter. When you've eaten a banana or a bagel (or a plate of spaghetti or a glass of apple juice), and you test an hour later at 185 on your meter, then you know not to eat any more bananas or bagels, etc., regardless of whether the ADA says they're safe to eat.

The fasting glucose levels and the A1c are all good tools to consider in diagnosing diabetes, but the clincher is the postprandial (after meals) readings which show exactly what happens in your body when you eat. There is a test called the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) which requires drinking a measured amount of glucose under exact lab conditions, and having your blood levels monitored at specified intervals. This test shows the doctors just exactly what happens when you ingest pure carbs. If you continue to have mixed results, I urge you to get the OGTT.

And the sooner you can get your own meter, the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Maybe the OGTT is the way to go for now. I'm not able to test at this time because I'm blind. I would need a special talking meter and training on how to test, and I can't get either of these till I'm actually considered to be diabetic. Though blind people do test themselves, of course, it's very hard to do it just right, and many give up totally out of frustration. And as much as I'd like to test so I really know what's going on with my body, a part of me doesn't want to start the sticking and pricking business till I absolutely have to. My fingers are very important to me, as I read Braille with them; and the thought of jabbing them with needles doesn't sit well with me. I keep looking for a simpler way to test, but there doesn't seem to be anything out there yet.

In any event, assuming that my blood sugar is spiking after I eat my lousy cup of cereal, mini bagel, or piece of fruit, but I'm able to maintain my fasting numbers below 100, how important, then, is the A1C? I find it so incredible that people need numerous medications in order to eat the very limited number of carbs they eat per day. I guess things can get really bad with our bodies as this disease progresses. I'm even blown away by my OWN numbers, as I would've thought that with all I've cut out of my diet, they'd be much lower than they are. The whole thing is just so disturbing to me. And if I spike after eating these carbs, then I ask you what exactly CAN I eat? I've heard that your body needs carbs at each meal in order for you to have enough energy to get through the day; but if carbs are what is destroying us, then should we even be eating them at all? I suppose I could give up all carbs except for fruit and vegetables, which are supposedly "healthy" carbs; but, God, I wouldn't want to! Besides eggs and cheese, what other breakfast foods are really safe for us to eat? I'm just trying to understand all of this, and I can't seem to get my mind around it because it's so crazy!

And if Extend and Glucerna snacks cause some people to spike, then how can these companies get away with saying that their products are safe for diabetics to eat? That's false advertising, and they could get in trouble for that, couldn't they? Why hasn't anyone reported them? I'm hungry so much of the time but am afraid to eat most things now. I know that 99 percent of people can't relate to my need to gain weight, but I just don't know what to do. Most snacks I can think of have carbs; so what can I eat to gain lots of weight, other than nuts? I need to find a way to handle all of this now, while I'm still in the early stages of the disease.

Thanks for reading my rant. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
I eat turkey breast or chicken, avocado, and a few berries for breakfast. Sometimes eggs, sometimes a hamburger. Cereal and milk to too loaded with carbs for me. Cottage cheese sort of works, but again, it is a source of carbs.

Shanny's suggestion to add some fat to your diet makes a lot of sense. It can be cheese, a little extra olive oil, nuts (macadamias are great for this), nut butter, olives.

The reason manufacturers get away with advertising their products as OK for diabetics when they contain loads of carbohydrate is that standards are poorly set by the FDA and the ADA. The US food pyramid is really designed to keep the agriculture industry humming along.

Despite your resistance to doing so, only testing can reveal what foods are causing your blood sugar to rise. You can determine which carbs work in your diet by testing before you eat, then testing again at one and two hours after the first bite. This will tell you how high you spike (1 hour) and whether your pancreas is able to bring you back down to pre-meal range (2 hours). Once you know this you will be able to reduce or eliminate foods that cause the spikes.

Also, know that while you sleep many metabolic functions are occuring that influence your blood sugar. Your liver and muscles release glucose and if your pancreas is compromised, your body is not able to counteract that release. This may, in part, account for your unexpectedly high A1C.

Diabetes (or prediabetes) requires that we be proactive and do what's necessary to maintain good control. It's not always easy and we all have to do things we'd rather not. I don't like to test 10 times a day and do a minimum of 8 injections - but the alternative is just not in the cards for me. I don't know how you'll get around your vision difficulty, but you need to find a way to do more frequent testing. You can use alternate sites, like your palm or your thigh - the readings will reflect you blood sugar from about 15 minutes ago. But that will save your fingers. Sadly, those stick tests are just a part of a diabetic's life.

Jen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
My breakfast choices are the same as for any other meal of the day, although they weigh a little more heavily toward traditional breakfast meats like bacon & sausage. Overall, my breakfasts look a lot like Jen's. Today I happen to have guacamole made up, having served it with last night's burritos, so my breakfast was guacamole with cheese crisps.

I just don't eat simple carbs, period. What little I get are from high-fiber vegetables like spinach, cabbage, kale, artichoke hearts, etc. The only fruits I eat are avocados & tomatoes.

And Jen has covered this so well, that I'm going to shut up now. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks to all of you for your responses. I have to say that it saddens me greatly to read about the lengths that all of you have to go to in order to control something that our bodies should be controlling on their own. It also terrifies me to think that all of this is in my future.

Shanny, if you don't eat simple carbs anymore and eliminate all fruits, why do you still need medicine? I guess I'm not understanding where the excess glucose is coming from that causes you to need medicine. And aren't you lacking certain vital nutrients by not eating any fruit? I also thought that eating too much protein can cause high cholesterol, and that eating fatty foods is bad for your heart. I know that the need to control blood sugar trumps all of these other conditions, but you don't want to add more problems to the mix.

It does sound like I'm spiking after eating certain foods, and that that's what's causing my A1C to be so high. As I say, I can't check this for sure, though, until I'm actually diabetic, which I think is ridiculous! But let's say I am spiking after eating certain carbs. If I eliminate them, won't I continue to lose weight? Think of the Atkins and South Beach diets. If you cut out carbs, you're going to lose weight. Is eating some nuts, olives, and cheese going to counteract this loss in the long run? I tend to doubt it. Are there no safe snacks that anyone can recommend? I'm having serious concerns as to whether I'll be able to maintain this diet considering the situation with my weight.

Thank you all so much for being there and hashing this all out with me. Please forgive me if I'm being patronizing with my questions, as I don't mean to be. I'm just trying to learn as much as I can from all of you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
It isn't a case of excess glucose, it's a condition called insulin resistance. The metformin I use is the drug of choice for combating insulin resistance, because it works to help the cells access the available glucose, it doesn't pummel an overworked pancreas to produce even more insulin. Part of the treatment of diabetes is to do it in a way that preserves what pancreatic function still remains - a process which saves the beta cells which produce insulin, so they can keep providing it as long as possible.

One of the wisest voices we hear on diabetes and its management is Jenny Ruhl, the author of Blood Sugar 101. Hers is a huge website, but well organized, and I think the answers found there are much better explained than I can do. Besides which, she provides citations for all the studies which have been done which refute the propaganda flooding the airwaves about "healthy" eating, low-fat diets and diabetes management as interpreted by the ADA, FDA and other agencies.

There are many other authors who offer broad coverage of diabetes and its management, like Gary Taubes (Good Calories, Bad Calories), Gretchen Becker (The First Year: Diabetes Type 2), Dr. Richard Bernstein (Diabetes Solution). I'm a poor resource because I'm only one year into managing diabetes, but these just a few of my recommendations.

Here is a quote from Jenny Ruhl about low fat/low carb diets:
You may have been told that low carb diets are "dangerous" and can cause heart disease. This is because for many years it was a matter of religious belief that the Low Fat diet reduced heart disease and since people with diabetes are prone to get heart disease, the assumption was that anything but a low fat diet would be dangerous for them.

This turns out to be the single most damaging non-truth ever told to people with diabetes.

$415 Million Dollars and 49,000 Women Show No Benefits to the Low Fat Diet


In 2006, The Women's Health Initiative, a $415 Million dollar, eight year study of almost 49,000 middle aged women, which had been designed to prove the health benefits of the Low Fat diet, was forced to publish these conclusions:
Over a mean of 8.1 years, a dietary intervention that reduced total fat intake and increased intakes of vegetables, fruits, and grains did not significantly reduce the risk of CHD, stroke, or CVD in postmenopausal women.​
Source: Studies Proving The Safety and Efficacy of the Low Carb Diet
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
Thanks to all of you for your responses. I have to say that it saddens me greatly to read about the lengths that all of you have to go to in order to control something that our bodies should be controlling on their own. It also terrifies me to think that all of this is in my future.

It does sound like I'm spiking after eating certain foods, and that that's what's causing my A1C to be so high. As I say, I can't check this for sure, though, until I'm actually diabetic, which I think is ridiculous!
I don't understand why you are saddened to meet people who do what it takes to live heathfully with an unhealthy condition. It inspired me when I found so many others who are positive, inquisitive and proactive. In an earlier post, you mentioned your vision deficit. I'm not saddened by your experience...I admire that you have made whatever adaptations are necessary so that you can particiate and contribute! I guess it's a glass half full or half empty argument.

As for not being able to test until you are actually diabetic, please re-think this. Meters and strips are readily available from any pharmacy (including low cost items at WalMart). Anyone can test. If you think you are prediabetic, starting the testing routine now and modifying your diet are two things you can do to set yourself on the right track.

Barry Sears, author of The Zone, recommends a diet consisting (roughly) of 30% fat, 30% protein and 40% complex carbs with very little grain or fruit. You calculate your ideal weight based on a very simple formula, then eat as though that is your current weight. If you need to lose weight, it comes off gradually, if you need to gain weight, it comes on. You might want to obtain his book, or find his website. Very thoughtful chapters on what each of the macronutrients contributes.

Jen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,590 Posts
Shanny, if you don't eat simple carbs anymore and eliminate all fruits, why do you still need medicine? I guess I'm not understanding where the excess glucose is coming from that causes you to need medicine.
Even if you dont eat carbs for glucose, your body naturally releases glucose that gets stored in the liver. A diabetic can go for hours with nothing but water and still end up with high blood sugar. The body sees a need for energy and releases glucose into the blood stream. Of course, in a non-diabetic they dont notice it, because the pancreas puts out the needed amount of insulin to move that glucose into the cells where it belongs. But diabetics cant do that, either because they dont have the insulin to put out, or they are resistant to their own insulin and simply cant use it properly, or even a combination of both. So, thats why they still require whatever medication that they need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thank you, all, for your responses. Shanny, those are wonderful resources, and I will be sure to check them out.

Jen, I didn't mean to upset you with what I said. I think you, and all those whom I've met so far on this forum, are doing a wonderful job in dealing with a difficult situation; and you are all to be commended for your efforts in controlling this disease. You, and all who do take the steps necessary to live healthy lives, ARE an inspiration to me. It's not the same thing exactly, but I know how angry and frustrated I feel when people pity me because I'm blind. I don't want pity; I want to be viewed as a normal person and given a fair shot at life, whatever that may mean for me. So I'm sorry if I offended you in any way.

As for the meter, I CAN'T just go to Walmart or anywhere else and pick up any old meter because I can't read the screen. I, as a blind person, need to use a special meter that speaks your results to you and which is, naturally, more expensive than any of the others. And as for testing itself, that's another issue because, as I understand it - and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong - when you test, you have to get a certain amount of blood onto a certain part of the strip, or you won't get a reading. I don't know how you know where the blood is supposed to go - whether there's a mark on the strip, or if the color changes, or what; but from all that I hear, it's very hard for blind people to get just the right amount of blood in the correct place on the strip. Many people have to test a few times just to get one reading! So I will need special training in how to test myself as a blind person; and I can't seem to get this from any of the special agencies until I'm a diabetic. My insurance wouldn't even cover an appointment with a nutritionist for the very same reason, so I paid out-of-pocket to see one. The difficulty in testing myself concerns me greatly because I'm the type who, if at all possible, would want to test constantly so as to stay on top of what's going on with my body. How to deal with all of this? I just don't know. I've looked into continuous monitoring systems, but there are problems with those, and you still need to use strips with those systems. It's my problem to solve as best I can.

Pam, thanks for the great explanation. So there's a lot more to all of this than just what we eat, and much of it we can't even easily control. A difficult situation, to be sure.

So do none of you eat snacks between meals? Maybe you do, but you eat the same things for your snacks as you eat for your meals. And how often do you eat? My nutritionist said I should be eating a small meal every three hours or so. Not always practical, of course, but, well... And are whole-wheat wraps as bad for us as the bread is? I know all of you who've been talking to me wouldn't even go near either of them, but I'm not there yet! :)

Thanks again for all of your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
So glad you asked about wraps! :D I may not eat bread, but I still have my wraps! There are several recipes on our recipe board for burritos, chicken wraps, etc.

And there are several low-carb high-fiber wraps on the market - my favorite at the moment is Olé brand Xtreme Wellness which has 5g of carbs and 12g of fiber for each tortilla - I guess that means they're minus 7g carbs, eh? I get them at Kroger's. At any rate, they taste as good as every other flour tortilla, and they don't spike me.

And there ARE a few breads around that might agree with you . . . Nature's Own brand has eliminated all high fructose corn syrup from all their products, and they have at least one and prob'ly more breads which are only about 8g of carbs per slice. Their best for me are the ones marked "sugar-free", because in this rare case, they really ARE sugar-free. (can you tell I don't trust manufacturers' labeling?)

I eat mainly two meals a day, but I also eat small amounts between meals. Breakfast usually consists of a healthy splash of real cream in my coffee, because I don't get up very early & my morning meds must be taken without food. Then I eat lunch about noon, and I eat dinner about 5 p.m.

During the afternoon and through the evening I'm apt to have snacks or small meals, depending on how big my regular meals were. I keep hard-cooked eggs, peeled and covered with water, in a jar in the fridge most of the time, and they make excellent snacks. Mashed up with a little mustard/mayonnaise, they make a nice small meal wrapped up in a lettuce leaf or one of the low-carb tortillas. I keep cheese crisps around all the time too and a couple of those with some dip is a fine substitute for any crunchy chips I ever bought in previous lives! :D

Cheese sticks & beef sticks are easy to have around too - they're individually wrapped & have a long shelf life. Nuts are great . . . I keep a bowl of raw almonds on the table instead of a candy dish . . . there isn't a much more nutritious or filling snack than a handful of raw almonds; if my sweet tooth is aching, I add a few raisins to the handful of almonds.

I gotta shut up now . . . I'm just too long-winded! :eek:

B-b-b-b-but frozen treats are great too! Breyer's makes a line called CarbSmart which are totally addicting! Good Humor makes some little chocolate-covered bars too, that are only about 10g of carbs per bar. Any sugar-free popcicle is good, if you like popcicles.

Okay - I'm really shutting up now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
Is there any chance that you can get an appointment to see a dietitian? I have a problem with gastroparesis, where my food digests slow and this can become very tricky when taking insulin. When you have special needs, a dietitian can be a big help. I understand why you do not want to eat fats because they can cause cholesterol problems. You might want to get your cholesterol checked. You may be OK in this area and can add some fat to your diet that might help with the weight loss. By adding fats to your diet, you will be adding calories to your diet. Peanut butter, salad dressing and mayo are high in calories and fat.

I have a meter than talks. It is called Clever Chek Voice by Simple Diagnostics. I bought it because I was curious about it. Recently, it has come in handy since I just had eye surgery for cataracts and my vision is not the best. This meter was very inexpensive and if someone could set it up for you and teach you the basics of testing then maybe that would help you get through this initial stage of pre-diabetes. I certainly don't have your limitations, but I think that testing would give you some idea of how you are doing and let you know what carbs you can eat. If you do get diagnosed with diabetes, there are medication options available that can help you. I sense that you are hesitant about medications but they can offer you some additional help when needed. Despite our best efforts sometimes our body just doesn't do what we want.

Ask all the questions that you want, we are here to help each other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
I am sorry, but I didn't see your latest post. The talking meter and 50 test strips was about $35. With this meter, you would have to simply insert the test strip, which I think you would become very familiar with this very quickly. By using a deeper setting on your lancing device, you would have more than enough blood and you would find the end of the strip and the blood would get absorbed. Once you get through these steps, then the meter will do the rest. The meter will then tell you what your blood glucose is. If you need help in purchasing this meter, please let me know and I would be more than happy to help you get one and some strips. I think that I can get the manufacturer to send you a free meter. Please PM me if I can be of any help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
You guys are just terrific! No, Shanny, please don't shut up! Your suggestions for snacks, etc., are just wonderful and are greatly appreciated! Keep 'em coming! If you're long-winded, I wonder what *I* am!

Breezeonby, thank you so much for offering to help me purchase that talking meter. I am very touched by your desire to help. It isn't so much actually getting the meter that concerns me but rather getting the help to learn how to test. I suspect that if I went to your average nurse or diabetes educator, they might balk at the idea of showing a blind person how to test. You make it sound so easy, but I know many blind people find it difficult. Never having tested before, I can't say why. So you can set the lancing device to prick deeper? I didn't realize that. Does testing hurt? I've pricked myself with a pin once in a while but don't believe I've ever bled. Maybe testing on sites other than your fingers would hurt less, and this is what I would definitely want to do. As I say, if I can find someone who felt comforable showing me how to test, I might really try to do it. I really hate not knowing what's going on with my body when I eat. Maybe I can figure something out. It's just that most places usually want to push blind people to go to agencies for the blind for things of this nature. Will see what I can do.

My cholesterol is good right now, though high cholesterol does run in my family, too, so I am at least a bit concerned about keeping it in check. I did buy some macadamia nuts, though, and am looking forward to pouring on the calories with them. I couldn't gain much weight before I changed my diet, so I think it's extremely unlikely that I'll be able to do that now; but I'm going to try to gain at least a little back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
A lancing device usually has about 4 depth settings and some devices have as many as 11. The deeper the depth, the more force the device uses to prick your finger. Alternate site testing has become very popular, but I do not use it. I want the most reliable result and it is my personal choice to fingertip prick. If you are experiencing a low blood sugar, fingertip pricking is recommended. I am not sure if you live near a local chapter of a diabetes association, but many are staffed with social workers who are there to help diabetics find the help that they need. If you are able to have a chapter that you can call, I feel that they can help you or give you the direction you need to find help in finding someone to help you learn how to test. You can also call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-342-2383 and explain your situation to them and they can probably help you too.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top