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I am completly new to the forums. All of this is still fairly new to me. I was diagnosed with diabetes in March. I was in the hospital for a week because I went into diabetic keto-acidosis. It's taken all this time (and going to a endocrinologist) to figure out that I am not type 2 but type 1. I'm not dealing with the news very well.. I thought type 1 was a kid thing and I'm 25. I really wasn't expecting to be a type 1. I am completly freaked out by shots so it's been a challenge. My doctor says I'm still in the 'Honeymoon' phase and only need to do 10 units of Lantus before bed for as long as it works. My husband has to give me my shots. It takes me about 30 minutes to get to the point where I can get it but I've only been doing this for a few weeks now. So yes, it has been interesting. I am pretty freaked out, as I said before. A lot has been thrown at me and not a lot has been answered. I think that there is a lot that I can learn from these forums.
Anyway, thanks for reading! I'm happy to be here :)
 

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Rinoa, take a deep breath. Everything will be okay. Diabetes is not something that you need to freak out about. It is a shock to find out when you have it, let alone Type 1, however it is totally not a death sentence. First, it is advisable to visit a website at blood sugar 101. Jenny Ruhl (I think that's her name) is a diabetic and has created this website to help educate you on diabetes. It is an extremely helpful website. It really explains quite a bit. Also, most people on this forum follow a low carb/high fat diet. I do not know much about Type 1 as I am a Type 2, but there are many on this forum who are Type 1 and manage their diabetes quite well and are living very healthy lives. One individual (Richard) is very informative and has lived with Type 1 since the age of 6 and is now in his late 60's/early 70's? And, he is very healthy. Peruse the forums and look at the recipes that many have posted here. Most are very delicious and easy to make, and you will not feel deprived whatsoever.
As far as having to take shots; it's really not that bad. You really need to be able to give yourself your shot(s) each day because if your husband happens to be not available, it is important you can give yourself a shot. Trust me you will get very used to it. It is no worse than testing your blood sugar with meter than using a very thin needle to inject your insulin. I take 4 shots a day; 3 bolus of Humulog (fast acting at meals) and 1 shot at bedtime of Levemir (basal long acting). I can tell you, I do not like giving myself 4 shots a day, but I have to do it in order to keep my numbers down. I have been on both insulins for a little over a month now and I'm still having some highs and lows, but learning what causes my blood sugars to spike and what doesn't by testing with my meter.
I am sure many of the other people here will be introducing themselves soon to you. My advice to you is to pay alot of attention to them. All the people here are very supportive and understanding, and will help ease your anxiety about being diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic.
It would be helpful if you give us some information about you like what your numbers are, what types of meds you take (including any supplements), what caused your hospitalization and such. Everyone will certainly give you very researched advice and help whenever you need it.
Welcome again, sorry you had to become part of this community, but you will not be sorry you found all of us. We are a great big family and the support you will receive is priceless. Take care.
 

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Hi Rinoa - welcome to the forum. I'm a T2 so know nothing about being T1 - but do know about needle phobia. Oh boy.

I'm not sure people who don't have it can grasp what it's like, just as I can't understand people who are phobic about crossing a bridge. The only time I've fainted is when a needle came near me, and I have stories (and stories) of times this happened. Once, it was when I took a friend's dog to the vet and got scammed into holding the dog while the vet gave her an injection. OMG. I turned my back, tried to tell myself to be an adult, but felt a <bump> when the dog got her shot. She was fine. I fainted, literally collapsed on the floor. I get it.

When the CDE tried to hand me the lancet, I reached to touch it and recoiled as if it was a hot poker. I use an Accu-chek multiclix so I don't have ever to see a needle, but somehow - miraculously - I can poke myself now w/out trauma. Go figure. But today I got a flu shot and the poor nurse asked if I wanted someone to come in and hold my hand. I'm 61 yo fer cryin' out loud so said no, I was going to concentrate on being an adult, but got flushed and ... not easy. I get it.

I don't know about insulin, what sort of needle you're using, but maybe there's a different type that would be easier? What if you tried to spend some time with the needle (since this isn't about pain but psychology) to get used to it - not giving a shot yet, just handle it, look at it, try to take the boogy man out of it?

This bites, but you'll get there.
 

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I've been on insulin for over a year now and my husband still gives me my shots and if he's not here I apply lidocaine and ice to numb up... It's a 30 minute process but it works
 
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giving yourself shots

I am completly freaked out by shots so it's been a challenge. My husband has to give me my shots. It takes me about 30 minutes to get to the point where I can get it but I've only been doing this for a few weeks now. So yes, it has been interesting. I am pretty freaked out, as I said before. A lot has been thrown at me and not a lot has been answered. I think that there is a lot that I can learn from these forums.
Anyway, thanks for reading! I'm happy to be here :)
Rinoa_Heartilly, one trick I used when I first started giving myself shots was to spread two fingers on one hand and push skin back the depth of the needle then place just the tip of the needle against the skin then look away and slowly release the fingers holding skin and let it slide over the needle rather than try to push needle into skin. this doesn't take as much nerve as actively pushing needle. it gets easier the longer you do it.
 

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I never had any dificulty injecting myself, but I had experience injecting animals :(

Anyhow, I gave myself my very first insulin shot in the hospital, and never let anyone else inject me after that. When I started it back up, 11 mos after diagnosis (BUT WHO'S COUNTING? GRRRR should have been using it all along!!!) -- I saw the CDE, and she did give me one good piece of advice: throw the pen at your belly as if it was a dart. Lightly, in other words. It goes right in, and pain is absolutely minimal, if you even notice any.
 

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Welcome to the forum Rinoa,

I am new here as well and yes it is a lot to accept and understand all at once. The people on this forum are very nice, informed, and helpful. Browse this sight and bloodsugar101 as suggested by naynay and learn what works for your body.

Again welcome to the site :)
 

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Hello Rinoa, welcome! this period of adjustment is difficult. We have all been there. When you are accustomed to your diabetes management you will find it to be a matter of routine, without much stress like it is now. I was diagnosed in 1945, when I was 6, and am very healthy now.

Richard
 

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Hello and welcome!
I was diagnosed with type 1 last year age 45. Usually it is young people who gets type 1, but not always.
Hopefully you will find lots of interesting stuff in here, and I can say for me the honeymoon lasted for a year, but I started to live LCHF about 3 months after I was diagnosed. It really helped!
For a long period I didn`t need insulin at all, but I tested my BG many times a day to be sure my body managed to deal with the food I ate.
Hopefully you will not be afraid of the needles as the times go.
Wish you the best!
 

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Welcome from me also. It does get easier as you go along. I'm not wise about type 1, but am glad you are here and you've gotten some really good advice already. Ask what you want. The only 'dumb' question is the one not asked!

Ha, Richard, you and I are the same age. I, too, was born in 1939!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow. Thanks for all the supportive comments. I'm going to try some of these things out and see if it helps. I really didn't expect so many warm comments. Heh, it's nice. It rocks to know that other people are freaked out by needles too. I really do feel like a baby but it's a tough thing to beat. Thanks again everybody! Glad I joined :)
 

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I am type 2 but scared I was when I was diagnosed. No soda and cookies just shyer free. It took me wails to get used to giving it up. Loss weight was pretty hard but I lost sixty pounds before I got diagonsed then the Dr said to loss more. Its been hard some times to watch other people eat and me say no thanks. It took wails and my granddaughter telling me she liked my food. So we share especially my surgery free candy. So it really does get less scary.
 

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she did give me one good piece of advice: throw the pen at your belly as if it was a dart. Lightly, in other words. It goes right in, and pain is absolutely minimal, if you even notice any.
Absolutely. I had to self inject blood thinner many years ago and this worked a treat. Also make sure the injection is slow... ie push the plunger slowly so it doesn't sting.

It's a scary thing and very new, but I know I've found heaps of great stuff on here and I only joined a few days ago! (diagnosed a month ago). It's a steep learning curve alright!
 

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Hi and :welcome:
I got type 1 at the age of 38. Never had any needle phobia per se but as a former drug addict I had all sorts of mental resistance against injecting myself again. Thank good for the pens so that we don't have to use syringes...
I think it'd be good for you if you could take the shots yourself, taking control on all levels is crucial for treating this! Also, a sense of control in one area will empower you on other issues as well.
Don't hesitate to ask any questions you might have - the people on this forum is a really friendly bunch :)
 

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Hi there and welcome.
I was diagnosed last year June as type 1. Some doctors say type 2 and the endo isn't sure but says it doesn't matter as I am insulin defendant.
Anyway what I wanted to say is that I started with basal bolus and the rest but found after a couple of months that with a slightly increased basal in the morning and a lchf diet I am avoiding the bolus with very reasonable numbers.
Best of luck with it and don't be shy to ask this lot as much as possible.
 

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Hi there and welcome to the forum!! I am a T2 that only takes oral meds so I don't have any help for you on the insulin/needles, but you have gotten lots of good suggestions already. I will also recommend you read BloodSugar101 to get more insight into this disease none of us asked for.

It can be overwhelming at first, but diabetes can be managed and you can live a long and complication free life.

Glad you found us! Looking forward to getting to know you better. :)
 
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