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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

To start, I do not have any signs or symptoms of diabetes. I had some questions on reactive hypoglycemia. I am a healthy 30 year old male, 5'11" 162 lbs. BMI of 22, exersice 3-5 times per week. Eat pretty well. No soda, fast food, excess sugar. Mostly eat fish, steak, chicken with brown rice, vegetables. If eating bread I eat multi grain, low glycemic index bread. I have been feeling very fatigued, have brain fog, poor sleep (seem to wake up a lot around 2-4 am and toss and turn around 20-30 times), have ruled out sleep apnea, poor concentration, dull head aches, feel jittery a lot. Currently going to the Mayo Clinic for testing and evaluation. About 3 weeks ago I started checking my blood sugar, just out of the blue decided it's worth a look. So my fasting is always around the mid 80's. Pre meal usually mid 80's. 2 hours after meal usually mid 80's. A1C of 4.9. What interests me is my blood sugar spike occurs very fast, I'm talking 5 mins after I finish meal, it will get to about 111 usually and stop there. Then about 30-45 mins later it drops to the 70's. Then it slowly rises and stops around the mid 80's for the 2 hour mark. No doctor I've talked to is concerned with this. I even conducted a test with a bottle of (I'm assuming it's for diabetics that get dangerously low on blood sugar) carbs and sugar from the diabetic section of supermarket. Before drinking I was 88, 1 hour later I was 76, 2 hours later I was 72. Any ideas.
 

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Well, if you're experiencing reactive hypoglycemia, it's not severe by any means. The only thing you posted that resembles R.H. is the sudden drop a half hour after eating - and that drop isn't all that much.

However, any sudden drop in BG (blood glucose) can cause symptoms (I'm no expert on this but think it has something to do with adrenalin and maybe cortisol).

You MAY be experiencing the beginnings of a problem metabolizing carbohydrates. With R.H., the pancreas gets it signals messed up and produces too much insulin - hence the sudden drop in BG. With T2 diabetes, insulin resistance prevents the insulin produced from being completely utilized - hence the rise in BG.

Your pre and post-meal BG levels are well within normal. Even the 70s. I wouldn't think any doctor would be concerned about this.

You might try reducing carbohydrates with your meals to, say, less than 20g per meal (60g a day) and see if this prevents the BG drop right after meals. In fact, if you want to do more experimenting, you could reduce the carbs per meal even more.

I had reactive hypoglycemia years before I was dx'd with diabetes. At that time I went on a low-carb way of eating, but a few years later went back to carb eating. My symptoms of R.H. had lessened and I just got lazy. However, little did I know that my body was transitioning to diabetes. If I had kept up the low-carb lifestyle I really don't think I would be diabetic today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great info, thank you. I understand my drops are not significant enough to cause alarm. Just curious if they could be adding to my fatigue. My afternoon random cortisol level was 12 at 2:30 pm. I just turned in my 24 hr urine test and I'm curious if they will check my cortisol levels with it. I would love to get a test that compares my BG to insulin levels but my docs don't seem to eager about it.
 

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I have fought afternoon fatigue for YEARS. No test ever run has shown anything significant. My best guess right now is low(ish) thyroid - tests show a possibility, but not enough for an MD to be concerned. I will have to pursue this outside the established medical community.

I would still recommend the low-carb (with increased fat, not low-fat) for just about anyone. One of the side benefits of this way of eating is more energy. More people are getting on the low-carb/high-fat (LCHF) bandwagon who are not diabetic. They just find this is the best for them (not to mention that losing weight is another side benefit.) If you're interested, take a look around this site Low Carb for Beginners
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks VeeJay, I'll check it out. My S-TSH is 1.78, my T4 Free is 1.3, so on the low end of TSH, but I doubt it will raise any flags.
 

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The 30 minute BG drop is the right timing for phase one insulin release. With phase two release batting cleanup.

I don't know how to copy and paste using this iPad, if you go to phlaunt.com and search on 'what is normal blood sugar ' you will see that BG spike soon after eating. Make me jealous!

jj, keep working with your doctors, keep testing and studying! The answer is out there, somewhere.

I think learning about BG, and periodic testing, can help spot problems early. Maybe try eating LC or LCHF and see how you feel and how your BG reacts?

Speaking of which, VeeJay, both allergic to multiple foods, both RH years before DX, both almost headed diabetes off at the pass, both probably sub clinical hypothyroid..............are we secretly related?
 
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Hi jjsemperfi, welcome to the forum.

Some people without metabolic issues believe too few carbs causes sleeping problems. Me, I'd loose even more sleep worrying about the carbs making my BG go up. You might try putting potato starch in a glass of water or kefir and try drinking that at night. Needs to be a resistant starch, i.e. Bob's Red Mill brand for example, the resistant starch is not metabolized to glucose. You might find more info about this on freetheanimal. They have several articles about resistant starch. Just gotta be prepared for the shock of the guys people skills, and ignore the attitude over there.
 

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Hi,

To start, I do not have any signs or symptoms of diabetes. I had some questions on reactive hypoglycemia. I am a healthy 30 year old male, 5'11" 162 lbs. BMI of 22, exersice 3-5 times per week. Eat pretty well. No soda, fast food, excess sugar. Mostly eat fish, steak, chicken with brown rice, vegetables. If eating bread I eat multi grain, low glycemic index bread. I have been feeling very fatigued, have brain fog, poor sleep (seem to wake up a lot around 2-4 am and toss and turn around 20-30 times), have ruled out sleep apnea, poor concentration, dull head aches, feel jittery a lot. Currently going to the Mayo Clinic for testing and evaluation. About 3 weeks ago I started checking my blood sugar, just out of the blue decided it's worth a look. So my fasting is always around the mid 80's. Pre meal usually mid 80's. 2 hours after meal usually mid 80's. A1C of 4.9. What interests me is my blood sugar spike occurs very fast, I'm talking 5 mins after I finish meal, it will get to about 111 usually and stop there. Then about 30-45 mins later it drops to the 70's. Then it slowly rises and stops around the mid 80's for the 2 hour mark. No doctor I've talked to is concerned with this. I even conducted a test with a bottle of (I'm assuming it's for diabetics that get dangerously low on blood sugar) carbs and sugar from the diabetic section of supermarket. Before drinking I was 88, 1 hour later I was 76, 2 hours later I was 72. Any ideas.
Your blood sugar numbers are perfect. Your doctor is right to not be concerned at all as there is zero cause for concern and anything you've said. Since your BG is perfect, you might want to continue your search elsewhere for what might be causing your symptoms.

70 is not hypo or even close. Many people have gotten confused about this. The ONLY reason diabetics were cautioned about going that low is because of insulin or medications which act directly to lower blood sugar. If you're at 70 and heading south fast because of chemical or insulin intervention, that could lead to actual hypoglycemia. But barring that, 70 is absolutely healthy. There are healthy, non-diabetic and non-hypoglycemic folks to return to 60 in every non-fed state.

If you are finding any kind of discomfort associated with the swing down to 70, then you can dampen the oscillations by eliminating foods which raise blood sugar: basically all the carbohydrates. But, there is no real health issue here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So this morning I ate 2 eggs, 3 slices of pastrami, half a cup of greek yogurt, 20 gram protein shake. As soon as I put my fork down I tested my sugar. It was 109. 15 mins later it was 96, 15 mins after that it was 68, 15 mins after that it was 67, 15 after that it was 85. So this is completely normal for people?
 

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It looks wonderful to me. I'm not a doctor, but I'd be thrilled to have those numbers. It looks like your pancreas does just what it is supposed to do.
 

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How did you feel while your blood sugar was dropping down to 68? If you felt shaky or dizzy, then perhaps you could avoid those sudden drops by not eating as much carbohydrates in the morning. There are many people who are carb sensitive in the morning and will wait until lunchtime to indulge in them.
 

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You may have non-diabetic hypoglycemia and it sounds like what my daughter experienced. This is one website that has a lot of information about this - The Hypoglycemia Support Foundation, Inc. . I would suggest that you explore the site and then using your favorite search engine type in the words "non-diabetic hypoglycemia" and read the ones that catch your attention.

Most doctors are not familiar with non-diabetic hypoglycemia and don't know what to look for or even how to test for it. I have also worked with several doctors that had asked me about this and pointed them in this direction. They were very surprised I even knew about it and did thank me for the direction I sent them in.
 

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You may have non-diabetic hypoglycemia and it sounds like what my daughter experienced. This is one website that has a lot of information about this - The Hypoglycemia Support Foundation, Inc. . I would suggest that you explore the site and then using your favorite search engine type in the words "non-diabetic hypoglycemia" and read the ones that catch your attention.

Most doctors are not familiar with non-diabetic hypoglycemia and don't know what to look for or even how to test for it. I have also worked with several doctors that had asked me about this and pointed them in this direction. They were very surprised I even knew about it and did thank me for the direction I sent them in.
Yeah, they only acknowledge it in the late 80s or 90s. I knew 2 hypoglycemics back in the 80s and they would get arrested for drunk driving or locked up in a psych ward because they though it was paranoid schizophrenia.

But, an actual hypoglycemic will KEEP going down to like below 40. There are normal people commonly at 60 and who swing down to 50 and that is no cause for concern unless it is FALLING will will continue to do so below that to actually dangerous levels.
 
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