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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Dr. Ponder is a pediatric endocrinologist & type 1 PWD. He makes some very good sense in this article: Use blood-sugar testing to reach goals | blood, sugar, most - DR. PONDER - Odessa American Online

Excerpt: The goal of all diabetics is to minimize the flux in their blood sugar readings and make their sugar patterns look more like a nondiabetic person. Therefore, everything you are taught as a diabetic and all the supplies and medications you are prescribed should be applied as tools or strategies to achieve this result. Use your tools to reach that goal each and every day to the best of your abilities. But since a blood sugar reading by itself is much like a single frame from a motion picture, the smart diabetic knows that these pieces of information can and should be put together to form a bigger picture of their overall diabetes control.

There are some important time points when a sugar check is more likely to give useful information. The first is before eating meals and snacks. Food is almost always going to increase blood sugars. Knowing how much your blood sugars rise with food can empower you in making better choices with medication doses, such as insulin, and better food choices. The second crucial time to check sugar is after eating, between two and three hours after finishing the meal to be precise. In nondiabetics, the blood sugar two to three hours after eating is always under 140 mg/dl. While such a tight target is not always reachable with all diabetics, it’s still something to aim for. I often suggest that readings at the two to three hour time point aim for under 180 mg/dl or less. But readings under 70 mg/dl would be considered too low at this point in time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Same here, and I can't agree with "fix the fasting first" either, although I was never raging out-of-control. Still, I've had no luck fixing my fasting, but I can keep my levels low all the rest of the day, controlling my postprandials, and I'll take what I can get.

But he gives a good explanation of why it's necessary to test regularly/frequently, and make good use of the information that gives you. The old "random testing gives random numbers" seems true . . . not much information to act upon.
 

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Now if he can only convince those helpful insurance companies only willing to provide T2's with strips for an inadequate one or two tests a day......

Jen
 

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Now if he can only convince those helpful insurance companies only willing to provide T2's with strips for an inadequate one or two tests a day......

Jen
I'm going through this right now. I currently get 150 test strips a month. I just went to my doc yesterday and we are going to see if they will bump it up to 180... but he didn't think they would go for anything over that. After 20 years, I'm trying to become a "compliant" diabetic by monitoring my diet, exercise, and glucose levels... but seems like I'm going to be limited in what I can do because of the insurance company.
 

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My insurance company doesn't cover any strips at all. I learned early on that this is an expense I am more than willing to pay myself. I rarely do a before meal number but always do an after meal especially in the morning since that is when my bgs are the highest. I rarely do a dinner after meal because I do a before bed and it is always in the 85-95 range. I do disagree with some of his numbers. I doubt non diabetics are ever as high as 120-140 unless they are pre diabetics or insulin resistant. It is my understanding that most normal people are closer to 100. Also the recomendation to keep below 180 was what I got from my CDE. When I followed those goals my fastings were always above 150.
 

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The old "random testing gives random numbers" seems true . . . not much information to act upon.
Yeah, sort of like randomly putting your arm out the window and determining the temperature over a 24-hr period. There are probably only 10 minutes in a 24-hr period where you'd be able to hit on an 'average' value.
 

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I also liked the article, but I'm with foxl.....sigh......the range of blood sugars are ideal but not always possible at least for me. And I'm so tired of testing so many times per day. My fingertips look like they are dirty from all the "jabs".
 

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I'm going through this right now. I currently get 150 test strips a month. I just went to my doc yesterday and we are going to see if they will bump it up to 180... but he didn't think they would go for anything over that. After 20 years, I'm trying to become a "compliant" diabetic by monitoring my diet, exercise, and glucose levels... but seems like I'm going to be limited in what I can do because of the insurance company.
As far as I know the insurance has to pay for whatever teh doctor orders. I dont think they have a choice. My doc orders enough for me to test 6-8 times a day. My insurance didnt give me a bit of grief over it
 

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Medicare wants to pay for only 3 tests a day. I had a dickens of a time convincing my Endocrinologist to write down anything more than that. He said I didn't need to test more than that because I have a CGMS (which I pay for out of pocket). He acted like the money for the test strips came out of his pocket.
 

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As far as I know the insurance has to pay for whatever teh doctor orders. I dont think they have a choice. My doc orders enough for me to test 6-8 times a day. My insurance didnt give me a bit of grief over it
Thanks Pam, you may be right. It was my doctor who was saying that the insurance company won't go for it... but he did up to what the max he thought they would pay for. I've been meaning to call the insurance company and ask what they will cover... just been a busy week and haven't gotten around to it yet. I just had my current prescription refilled a couple of weeks ago... so still have a couple of weeks before they will fill another prescription for the same thing (even though it is a new prescription). Anyhow, I'll let you know what happens. You know sometimes you have to fight with the insurance companies, but sometimes they will give in on some things. I have my fingers crossed! :)
 

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As far as I know the insurance has to pay for whatever teh doctor orders. I dont think they have a choice. My doc orders enough for me to test 6-8 times a day. My insurance didnt give me a bit of grief over it
I called the insurance company yesterday and told them I have been testing 9-10 times a day, and they said they will cover 300 chemstrips a month! :D I was shocked. I was expecting to have to argue with the insurance company.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I called the insurance company yesterday and told them I have been testing 9-10 times a day, and they said they will cover 300 chemstrips a month! :D I was shocked. I was expecting to have to argue with the insurance company.
Hallelujah! :D :D :D
 

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On another thread I mentioned what I went through today but will relay it here too. Yesterday was suppsed to get my strips refilled and insurance rejected it. Find out today that they won't pay for more than 4-6 tests a day. New rules with them. Pharmacy tech said they see this all the time. My endo faxed the pa order to insurance and still havnt got my strips. Type 1 and have been testing 8-10 x a day for many years and they pull this! I was so mad I almost decided to say the heck with it and not even try anymore :(
Has to pay out of pocket today for them. Am in the process of getting a cgms soon ... Ya think they will then fight me over getting the sensors?
 
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