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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was diagnosed with Diabetes 2 about six years ago. I did not have a great deal of problems controlling it but hit some really rough times about three weeks ago when I had four wisdom teeth extracted. I found that I did not heal very well but kept bleeding for five days - at least that what I thought was happening. In retrospect I realize that what I was spitting out was caused by an infection. I was in so much pain that I did not eat right nor did I drink sufficiently. One day I woke up feeling terribly weak. The lights seemed unnaturally bright as did the sky. I felt so bad I went to an emergency care clinic. When I threw up I heard them conferring among themselves. Then they came in and advised me to go to the hospital. When I arrived there they put me on four I.V.s: Magnesium, Potassium, saline and insulin. They told me my electrolytes were drastically depleted because I had DKA which, they said, was a life-threatening condition. Three days later I was released and told never to take Jardiance or metformin again. Instead I have to take a daily injection of Lantus and Humalog whenever my glucose level went over 200. Up until that time I had never taken insulin. There is a lot of diabetes in my family. My brother and mother both have type 2 for which they take oral medications. We all developed it when we were older although mine has grown much worse than theirs. The doctor said that I now produce no insulin at all. This has made me wonder if I actually have LADA since, as I understand it, only children get Diabetes type 1. An additional risk factor with me is that I have Bipolar Disorder (type 1) which I developed when I was 40 (I am now 61). People with Bipolar Disorder have a greatly increased risk of developing diabetes (among other medical illnesses). I still have not been able to figure how this Lantus works. I tried taking it in the evening but my blood glucose levels went up too much during the middle to latter part of the day then dropped too low at night (to 50-60 mg/dL). I generally fare better taking it in the morning. That way I get through breakfast and lunch and the blood levels do not get too high until the evening only to drop too low at night. Although it goes too high it rarely goes above 201 mg/dL so I rarely take the Humalog. It seems to me that having it up around 150-160mg/dL for hours is not good which makes me wonder if the doctor ought to prescribe more Lantus (currently I take 26units/day) Sorry do not have a current A13 because it has been only a short time since I was in crisis. I am glad to be able to talk about these things with someone.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

I'm so sorry you've been through so much. I think you'll find that the members on this forum are very sympathetic to the struggles many have with managing their diabetes.

As I read your post, I'm wondering if you have a diabetes educator who can help you with your insulin dosing. Also, have you made any specific changes in your diet to help lower your blood sugar?

As you read through the forum threads, you'll find that for the most part, the diabetics here have reduced the amount of carbohydrates, even those on insulin.

Do visit here often and ask any questions you might have.

Are you familiar with Dr. Richard Bernstein, a T1 diabetic, who has written a book that gets recommended here often. Much of his book is available to read online.
Read Online - Diabetes Solution - Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution. A Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars. Official Web Site
 

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Hi Jimi, I'm glad you made it to the ER in time!

The insulin instructions your doctor (or was it just the ER?) gave you are a bit out of date. It's much easier to use insulin by working with a doctor who specializes in diabetes (endocrinologist) who can prescribe insulin doses to match your meals and activity. If that's an option, it is well worth the wait to get an appointment and work with someone who knows their stuff.

They can also get you tested for antibodies, because if you are Type 1 which isn't a childhood disease, it means that your diabetes is caused by an autoimmune attack where your body destroys your ability to make insulin. It's helpful to get that diagnosis because it gets you access to specialists, improved care, and insurance coverage is better.

When I first started on insulin, I just had my regular doctor and had to learn everything on my own. The book "Think Like a Pancreas" is really good and teaches you how to use the right amount of insulin depending on what you are eating, and helps you figure out how to avoid going too low.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Jimi, I'm glad you made it to the ER in time!

The insulin instructions your doctor (or was it just the ER?) gave you are a bit out of date. It's much easier to use insulin by working with a doctor who specializes in diabetes (endocrinologist) who can prescribe insulin doses to match your meals and activity. If that's an option, it is well worth the wait to get an appointment and work with someone who knows their stuff.

They can also get you tested for antibodies, because if you are Type 1 which isn't a childhood disease, it means that your diabetes is caused by an autoimmune attack where your body destroys your ability to make insulin. It's helpful to get that diagnosis because it gets you access to specialists, improved care, and insurance coverage is better.

When I first started on insulin, I just had my regular doctor and had to learn everything on my own. The book "Think Like a Pancreas" is really good and teaches you how to use the right amount of insulin depending on what you are eating, and helps you figure out how to avoid going too low.
I think I did not know enough to ask the right questions. I was originally diagnosed with type 2 but when I went to the endocrinologist he told me I was no longer producing insulin at all. Apparently taking medications like Jardiance can actually be harmful if your pancreas does not produce insulin. At any rate, he said taking it had contributed to my metabolic melt-down. I was told never to take that or metformin again. It used to be relatively easy to manage my condition but the parameters have changed for some reason. Does this mean I have LADA? About the dosages. This Lantus is not supposed to have peaks and valley's but I have my doubts about that. Thanks for the reference.

JS
 

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Hi JimiSurvivor, welcome to the forum. Glad you got your bout of DKA taken care of and a confirmation of the status of your beta cells. Many cases of type 1.5 LADA are originally misdiagnosed as being type 2. They can still be intermittently producing insulin and have no signs of antibodies pointing to type 1.

Jardiance is similar to Invokana and is probably harmful to even those producing insulin and not necessarily to just those that don't.

If you are not producing insulin at all you will need more than just Lantus. Lantus is a slow acting, basal, insulin used to control your BG throughout the day. Whenever you eat you will need a faster acting, bolus, insulin to offset the BG that comes form things you eat. I don't use insulin so I'll let others address any questions you have about it.

I'm not sure there is much difference from being type 1 or 1.5 (LADA) except timing of when your beta cells fail, but if you don't make insulin anymore it doesn't matter what they call it, you will need to take insulin. Like I said I don't use insulin, but if I had to, I would look at going with a pump and a CGM (continuous glucose monitor)
 

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If I'm being honest here, I have worked in a private clinic and have a word or two to say. First of all, the main problem is caused by the fact that a lot of hospitals are simply greedy, I don't know how to explain it, and they are not verifying their tools at the good time.
 

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Hi Carolyntgi, glad to see you posting. As with a lot of big businesses, i.e. big medical, big pharma, big foods, big auto, etc., there seems to be more concern with making money than taking care of the customer at the upper levels of the businesses and with those seeking to reach those upper levels. Below that tier, I think that most are focused on quality care/products and customer satisfaction. Unfortunately the upper tier sets the standards that the lower tier is told to comply with.

I would like to invite you to tell us a little about yourself and your managing diabetes so far in the New Member Introduction forum. Looking forward to hearing from you.
 

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Hello, and welcome to the forums. Sorry I haven't been on to welcome you before but I had to replace my computer tower and was MIA for a few days.
 
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