The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For the last 2 months since being diagnosed type 2 I have been working hard to take care of my self and manage my BG levels. I keep my carbs under 60 per day. The majority of my carbs come at lunch so I can work them off during the day. I have been riding my bike 3-4 days a week, drinking a lot of water. Taking all my medications, and I have lost 15 pounds, so overall things have gone well. At least until the last 2 weeks. My FBG's had dropped to the 110-120 range now they are 120-130. My post meal BG's were 100-110, now they are 120-140 with some topping 160+. and my post exercise BG's are 130 and then today they were 160. AARRGH!!!.
Did I mention that this was frustrating. The harder I work to take better care of my health and BG, the worse it gets
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,162 Posts
Did I mention that this was frustrating. The harder I work to take better care of my health and BG, the worse it gets
Well ... try stopping all that hard work and =then= say it's worse. No don't! Kidding! :)

It really can be frustrating. Just when you think you've got the key, just when things are moving along swimmingly - kapow! Seems like a constant riddle, another tweak awaiting us 'round the bend.

Good luck figuring it out. Are you keeping a careful log? (me either) It's hard to record every little thing, but the closer we can get to that, the better our chance of dx'ing what's going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
Sometimes with Diabetes you need to be a detective, sometimes. Try to figure out if you have changed anything. Even sometimes when I get a refill for an RX, it may work a little differently. Also are you coming down with a cold. I know with me, a few days before I get sick my bgs will go high. It has been explained to me that our stress hormones kick into overdrive and signal liver to increase glucose to fight whatever infection or inflammation that is going on. Sometimes you need to cut carbs for a few days or switch meals around to see if that works. Hope you figure it out.
 
G

·
yes, it's frustrating :D 13 years after diagnosis for me and I still get frustrated. But I think it's your outlook that makes the difference... diabetes has a tendency to disappoint... hey it's not a welcome guest really anyway. I was going to say that with all your exercising, that could be causing fatigue/stress in your body and raising your BGLs. I used to workout 2 hours everyday with mix of weights and cardio and I used to get extremely frustrated as I was trying to get my BGLs down and lose weight and I didn't seem to achieve either... but I kept at it. But then suddenly I got very sick and continued that way. In hindsight I'm wondering if I over did it with my exercise? My sickness started in 2007 and it's been a rollercoaster ride of illness since. It stopped me from exercising regularly too which I wasn't happy about. Even now I get a lot of pain just briskly walking... so I just aim to move about as much as I can throughout each day now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,463 Posts
There is no guaranty that you will be able to control your BGs with nothing more than diet and exercise. Much depends on other factors, such as your remaining beta cell capacity. There is no shame in adding meds to your toolbox. (From what I have read, metformin and/or insulin would be my med(s) of choice; the others either have side effects I prefer to avoid, or--in the case of sulfonylureas--offer less precise control of BGs than insulin, and are suspected of burning out your remaining beta cells by stimulating them to produce even more insulin.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,399 Posts
Hate it when I do everything right and things go wrong, anyway!

Temperature changes sometimes do it to me. Silly, but true. I have to adjust my insulin upwards for cold weather and downwards for hot.

Others find they must adjust in the opposite directions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
You took the words right out of my thoughts

:hand:Welcome to the most frustrating disease in this world. Diabetes may seem (at least on paper) like an exact science, but the truth is, for those of us who have diabetes, it is not anywhere near the term: EXACT!

Diabetes, and everything about it can be summed up in one exact word: FRUSTRATION!

So stick with the plan, don't be afraid to experiment, and expect to have some good days, some not so good days, and tons of those days where you just can't seem to figure out which end is up to :Cry:

You are in the company of millions who have similar situations, and you can take great comfort knowing that when you are confused, so are a few million others.

Thanks for your honesty. You have what it takes to win the majority of the battles diabetes will bring your way. Just never forget , Diabetes is a formidable FOE!


Pastor Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
Paul, Type 2 is progressive for many people. The pancreas produces less insulin as the years pass, and it becomes necessary to use some insulin. Eventually both fast and slow acting insulins may be needed. I have a couple of Type 2 friends who use insulin pumps, and they have excellent control. When Type 2 diabetics reach that stage, they are much like Type 1, but they are still insulin resistant, so they are categorized as Type 2.

I am not suggesting that you will have to use insulin now. You may never have to do so, but if that is the problem, I want you to know that you can have great control with insulin. Your present problem may be due to something completely different, and you may resume your normal blood sugar ranges soon.

Don't be hesitant to use insulin if the time comes, it is great for diabetics who need it. I have used insulin for 65 years, so I should know.

Richard
 
G

·
Paul, Type 2 is progressive for many people. The pancreas produces less insulin as the years pass, and it becomes necessary to use some insulin. Eventually both fast and slow acting insulins may be needed. I have a couple of Type 2 friends who use insulin pumps, and they have excellent control. When Type 2 diabetics reach that stage, they are much like Type 1, but they are still insulin resistant, so they are categorized as Type 2.

I am not suggesting that you will have to use insulin now. You may never have to do so, but if that is the problem, I want you to know that you can have great control with insulin. Your present problem may be due to something completely different, and you may resume your normal blood sugar ranges soon.

Don't be hesitant to use insulin if the time comes, it is great for diabetics who need it. I have used insulin for 65 years, so I should know.

Richard
I'm type 2 on both basal and bolus insulin :D
I wish I was placed on it sooner to be honest.... docs don't regularly test (if at all) type 2's for progression and that is the problem. I was trialled on all the oral drugs which didn't really work on me for some time... but it was "let's try a new drug or a new dosage". I'm not so sure I'm insulin resistant as such as I certainly appear to respond to any insulin injected. That's probably the other problem... some type 2 diabetics get stereotyped as "insulin resistant" when in fact they are "insulin deficient".
Tgreen - don't be afraid to go on insulin if you have to... get the C-peptide test done though to check state of your pancreas first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,399 Posts
I agree with Mep. Tracking and testing of Type 2s is oft-neglected, and many 2s do need insulin sooner, not later.

But insulin is not always forever for us 2s.

For me, the Type 2 diagnosis and insulin were a package deal ... and I was mortified.

Then, something even more shocking happened: I grew really fond of the stuff!

I can occasionally stray a (teensy-weensy) bit from my strict, very-low-carb routine. Many folks seem to have more dietary freedom than I do; hope you're one of 'em! Main thing is ... if my levels are high, I can literally shoot 'em back down again.

Don't know ... or remember ... where you're at, weight-wise. But insulin does appear to slow down weight loss. Which means every carb I sneak in has maybe twice the weight-gain potential than it would have if I were non-diabetic. But if you're trying to gain or maintain, it's a Good Thing.

On the down-ish side, insulin requires math all day, every day. Lows can result from dosage miscalculations; scheduling and timing become crucial as well. Being able to correct a high is groovy ... but the goal is to avoid them altogether. Highs cause damage. Period. No matter how brief they are. Still, I have a lot more control over highs with insulin, rather than without. And so far I have avoided truly scary lows.

All in all, I would never want to give up insulin for other meds.
 
G

·
I agree with Mep. Tracking and testing of Type 2s is oft-neglected, and many 2s do need insulin sooner, not later.

But insulin is not always forever for us 2s.

For me, the Type 2 diagnosis and insulin were a package deal ... and I was mortified.

Then, something even more shocking happened: I grew really fond of the stuff!

I can occasionally stray a (teensy-weensy) bit from my strict, very-low-carb routine. Many folks seem to have more dietary freedom than I do; hope you're one of 'em! Main thing is ... if my levels are high, I can literally shoot 'em back down again.

Don't know ... or remember ... where you're at, weight-wise. But insulin does appear to slow down weight loss. Which means every carb I sneak in has maybe twice the weight-gain potential than it would have if I were non-diabetic. But if you're trying to gain or maintain, it's a Good Thing.

On the down-ish side, insulin requires math all day, every day. Lows can result from dosage miscalculations; scheduling and timing become crucial as well. Being able to correct a high is groovy ... but the goal is to avoid them altogether. Highs cause damage. Period. No matter how brief they are. Still, I have a lot more control over highs with insulin, rather than without. And so far I have avoided truly scary lows.

All in all, I would never want to give up insulin for other meds.
yeah I agree after having had both oral meds & insulin... I'd rather the insulin despite the mishaps it can cause (I'm still trying to figure that out at times). The oral meds just stress out your pancreas and cause it to be damaged sooner it seems. I think your doc did the right thing by you actually... insulin is the safer option when it comes to protecting you. My weight hasn't gone up at all since starting insulin in Feb10... but then it hasn't gone down either and I could do with losing 15kgs. I'm 173cm in height so I've always had people tell me they don't think I'm fat and carry any weight I have well... I don't like my stomach as it is out of proportion with rest of my body.. but it is bloated all the time. Funnily when I was 10kgs heavier than I am now I was told I looked fat by the males in my family... so I had better be careful.... they're very honest with me about my looks (apparently I don't look fat now they tell me). lol. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,476 Posts
I keep my carbs under 60 per day. The majority of my carbs come at lunch so I can work them off during the day.
You could try distributing your carbs more evenly throughout the day. If I eat many carbs at one sitting, it takes my bg up and sometimes takes a few days to get it back down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,399 Posts
yeah I agree after having had both oral meds & insulin... I'd rather the insulin despite the mishaps it can cause (I'm still trying to figure that out at times). The oral meds just stress out your pancreas and cause it to be damaged sooner it seems. I think your doc did the right thing by you actually... insulin is the safer option when it comes to protecting you. My weight hasn't gone up at all since starting insulin in Feb10... but then it hasn't gone down either and I could do with losing 15kgs. I'm 173cm in height so I've always had people tell me they don't think I'm fat and carry any weight I have well... I don't like my stomach as it is out of proportion with rest of my body.. but it is bloated all the time. Funnily when I was 10kgs heavier than I am now I was told I looked fat by the males in my family... so I had better be careful.... they're very honest with me about my looks (apparently I don't look fat now they tell me). lol. :D
I rant ... a lot. But yes, getting insulin, a meter and rudimentary lessons immediately was stellar! I also get a lot of support as I've gone beyond the basics.

Tired of that bloaty puff in front, though.

I bet your overall proportions are better now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
i think my carbs are about 20% for breakfast, 50% at lunch and 30% at dinner. my post lunch BG's have been normally 102 - 115 so i dont think this is so bad.
i am very concerned about other oral meds for DB to help my numbers. but there is this hesitancy to move to insulin too. how do you get past that. the logic would seem that oral meds make your body work harder to try and manage your BG. and insulin would take some of the stress off of it, but insulin .... maybe it just the needle thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,399 Posts
i think my carbs are about 20% for breakfast, 50% at lunch and 30% at dinner. my post lunch BG's have been normally 102 - 115 so i dont think this is so bad.
i am very concerned about other oral meds for DB to help my numbers. but there is this hesitancy to move to insulin too. how do you get past that. the logic would seem that oral meds make your body work harder to try and manage your BG. and insulin would take some of the stress off of it, but insulin .... maybe it just the needle thing.
Oral meds make your body work harder, and some types make it function differently than originally designed. If used alone, I also don't like the part about having to wait out a spike, rather than correcting it fairly quickly.

I think insulin's bad rep is due to the needles, yes, but also to the fact that it's seen as The Last (as in Terminal) Resort for Type 2s.

Also, some docs will hold the threat of insulin over a patient's head as punishment for "bad behavior."

To the contrary, insulin simply gives the pancreas' natural function a vital assist. In a way, it's similar to the way glasses assist the eyes, right down to the need for different strengths for different folks, at different times.
 
G

·
yes I agree with Shalynne on that one... if I could turn back time I'd rather be on insulin a lot sooner. I was a bit nervous about injecting too when I started, but it's just a psychological hurdle that you very quickly get over... I got over it after the first injection. The first injection I really had to think about it. lol. What I'm saying is that my natural reaction when I saw I had a needle pointing at my stomach was "no way I'm not doing this".... but then "I have to do this to feel better". It's a small price to pay really. In comparison to what most oral meds do to your pancreas I think the insulin is a much safer option. Also I'm not confident that a lot of those oral meds have been extensively studied as to their effects on our bodies. If you read other posts from me you can see why I have my doubts. But if your BGLs are consistently high at any point... discuss with your doc... meds are there to help us.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top