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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone!
This is BigBill and I am a borderline/not completely diagnosed type 2 diabetic. As i educate myself about this condition, I realize that this condition has affected me since childhood. You see, I was a 110 pound third grader! By the time I was in eighth grade, I only weighed 120 and was in good shape. On to adulthood where I weighed up to 355 lbs and recently had blood sugar crashes, unquenchable thirsts, and excessive urination. I have found that at this time and weight (295 lbs) when I eat smaller meals, limit sugar intake, and exercise, I feel better, drink normally, and urinate much less frequently. I try to include chromium gtf in my supplements and eat cinnamon in my oatmeal and on apples. Does anyone have any other tips to help me control this condition other than drugs?
 

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Anti-Man Made Carbs!
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eliminate all man made carbohydrates and walk at least 3 miles a day
 

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eliminate all man made carbohydrates and walk at least 3 miles a day
Yup, the answers to controlling blood sugar are mostly your diet (change it for life) and daily exercise.

As suggested, the diet MUST restrict carbs to eliminate starchy products: Potatoes, Corn, Parsnips, Bread, Cereal, Grain, Rice, Etc. will ALL spike blood sugar.

I find I can ONLY eat sprouted-grain bread (it has NO flour), in limited quantities (1pc per day maximum). I can eat some of the high-fiber/low-carb tortillas, again though, I limit myself to 1 per day max.

Keep your carb intake to non-starchy veggies, and you'll have exceptional blood sugar levels.

Exercise is a key component, and daily is important. I can't walk without pain, but I can ride an exercise bike so I do that daily. Exercise always burns glucose, it's great. And both the exercise and the subsequent weight loss from the diet/exercise help with insulin resistance.

p.s. I was also quite large/heavy at diagnoses. I was over 320lbs at one point, and still close to 300 at diagnoses. I'm now down to 235 with MUCH better overall numbers.

... and :welcome: to the forum!
 
G

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welcome Bigbill :) you can do it! At first diet and exercise can work a treat.... but please don't be afraid if you have to take meds to get BGLs under control. It's better to have good BGL control than wind up with complications. To be honest either way is scary when you think about it... but keeping a positive attitude helps. Now I have good reason to be really grumpy about diabetic meds, especially metformin, as I was diagnosed with another chronic disease this year.... mainly I believe due to all the drugs I've been on... starting with metformin which upset my stomach to no end. I understand why you would want to stay off drugs... really I do. But then again you may only need temporary help if diet and exercise doesn't cut the mustard totally for you. Good luck with it.... keep us posted on how you're doing.
 

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Great advice already given Bill and Welcome!

Here is my usual spiel on diet (in this case "diet" simply means "what I eat", as opposed to a drastic short-term weight-loss change)...

Real whole food, is the order of the day... preferably local and in-season, grown/reared on nutrient rich land, fuelled by sunlight... grass-fed beef and pastured chickens for example. This means eat whole (unprocessed, unpackaged, unadulterated) food, which includes a natural balance of fat, protein and carbohydrates (as well as vitamins, minerals etc...) ...there really is no need to be afraid of natural fat... it's gotten a bad rap.

Those of us with (or at risk of developing) Diabetes need to pay particular attention to the foods which have the most effect on our Blood Glucose (BG) levels. There are obvious things to watch out for like candy, cola, cakes and sweets (these are high in refined/concentrated carbohydrates)... next in line are the "white" foods like bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, breakfast cereal... but even something assumed to be healthy like orange juice has about as much sugar as a cola... fat reduced milk can have an higher proportion of lactose (sugar), especially in low-fat products such as yogurts; which may have High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) added to replace the fat... and so it goes on. That does not mean you need to feel deprived or hungry to eat this way, not by any means. You may even find you can work in an occasional family cake... for example. The keyword there being "occasional" as it used to be when our Grandparents baked cakes only for Birthdays etc... not everyday (muffins, donuts, pastries) for breakfast.

If you have an home BG test meter, you may hear the phrase "eat to your meter" and this deceptively simple message is very wise... test around your food and figure out what works best for YOU.

Learn to read nutritional labels AND ingredient lists. Be aware of hidden "sugars" -- mostly ending with "ose" -- and starches (such as Maltodextrin) which also quickly break down into sugars.

Some ideas for snacks: nuts, cheese, dark chocolate (70% cocoa or higher), pork rinds/scratchings, cold (home cooked) meats, boiled eggs, peanut butter.

While we are encouraged to eat "so many servings of fruit and veg daily", many of these can spike our BGs so test, test test... for me, green leafy vegetables seem to work best... but you may also help reduce/slow the BG spike by mixing foods... for example: instead of eating an apple by itself, try just half the apple in slices with some peanut butter or cheese... or have a few berries with some cream.

I'd suggest that BG control be your primary aim... while minimising the need for insulin which is the major fat storage hormone -- reducing excess fat mass, improving cholesterol/lipids, hypertension etc... all these tend to improve with more normal BGs.

I am not big on setting unrealistic "exercise" goals... flogging yourself at the gym... unless you feel especially motivated to do so. I think you are better off with something sustainable in the long term. There are many health benefits of activity but I'm not convinced that losing weight is a major one. I do believe in building activity into your daily routine (rather than finding excuses for missing the gym)... take the stairs, park further away, get off the bus a stop earlier... go for a walk at lunchtime... take "smoke breaks" at work where you walk around the block instead. Physical activity can help with your BG numbers as it tends to lower Insulin Resistance (IR) , as well as using up glucose but as with food, it is advisable to test and see how it affects you.
 
G

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yes I agree with Frank there about diet & exercise :D
I do eat carbs... although I stick to wholegrain and other low GI carbs mostly... in fact high GI carbs aren't great because they make your BGLs spike and crash quick. It's all about portion control and making sure you don't overdo things really.
I haven't been exercising myself due to illness... but realistically I do what Frank has mentioned and I use the stairs a lot at work and I walk a bit quite briskly (even though I don't feel so good)... but I haven't been doing exercise sessions as such.... just numerous activities throughout each day. I used to do 2 hours of planned exercise daily and to be honest I didn't that much better results with BGLs or my weight for that matter. Everyone is different too... so it's a matter of finding what works for you.
 

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Welcome to the forum. First, you need to realise as a diabetic your endocrine system doesn't work normally. So even when we eat healthy carbs like oatmeal and fiber cereal our bgs go very high and may take many hours to come back to normal. The most important thing to do in the beginning is test a lot. Test when you wake up and 2 hours after meals. A normal bg is around 83, so that should be your goal. Experiment with different foods until your 2 hour after meal number is close to 100. This is the best way to control bg. Unfortunately things like oatmeal may have to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Impressive #'s. Your regimen seems quite simple, but not easy. I guess its in how bad you want it! I never thought of "man made" carbs, makes sense. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the advice, we seem to be in the same boat! My best friend's sister grows sprouted wheat for a major health food store, so I am familiar with it. I agree with exercise, but does the severe carb limitations cause blood sugar crashes? Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow! Ever thought of publishing an ebook? Great advice, I especially liked the "ose" ingredients as a hidden sugar,clever. I will have to take you up on "eating to the meter", especially with peanut butter, I would have thought it would spike BG. (PB is high in fat, Protiens, and fiber though) Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
yes I agree with Frank there about diet & exercise :D
I do eat carbs... although I stick to wholegrain and other low GI carbs mostly... in fact high GI carbs aren't great because they make your BGLs spike and crash quick. It's all about portion control and making sure you don't overdo things really.
I haven't been exercising myself due to illness... but realistically I do what Frank has mentioned and I use the stairs a lot at work and I walk a bit quite briskly (even though I don't feel so good)... but I haven't been doing exercise sessions as such.... just numerous activities throughout each day. I used to do 2 hours of planned exercise daily and to be honest I didn't that much better results with BGLs or my weight for that matter. Everyone is different too... so it's a matter of finding what works for you.
Thanks for the advice, I hope you can find some sort of exercise that suits your present situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Welcome to the forum. First, you need to realise as a diabetic your endocrine system doesn't work normally. So even when we eat healthy carbs like oatmeal and fiber cereal our bgs go very high and may take many hours to come back to normal. The most important thing to do in the beginning is test a lot. Test when you wake up and 2 hours after meals. A normal bg is around 83, so that should be your goal. Experiment with different foods until your 2 hour after meal number is close to 100. This is the best way to control bg. Unfortunately things like oatmeal may have to go.
Thanks, I haven't seen too many 83's, mostly 100 to 120. I guess i will have to restict my carbs more. Appreciate the precise and practical advice!
 
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