The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's me again. Lately I have been starving, I'm eating a good breakfast, then at 930 I check my BG and it's about 4.2-4.9. I'll have a snack, usually 15-30g of carb with a protein and come 11am-1130am I am absolutely starving. Yesterday at 1145am I was shaking I was so hungry. Anyone else experience this? Should I eat more calories or more carbs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
What do you mean by a "good breakfast"?

For me I find dietary fats and protein as found in a natural balance in real whole foods as the best way (for me) to maintain stable BGs and feel satisfied.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AnnV

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I usually have a whole grain bagel with egg or peanut butter and an apple. Or I have high fiber cereal, Fiber 1 honey cluster I think and an apple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
if the carbs are high on the glycemic index, you will feel like you're starving soon after. you should try to eat 5-6 small meals a day, every 2-3 hrs. nothing bigger than a handful.

always have protein w/ your carb for stabilized sugars after meals. like for a snack i'll have an apple w/ natural pb. also keep each meal at around 300 cal tops. you'll have better results all around. weight/sugar/fatigue if you follow this method. eat as clean/ natural as possible.

don't confuse clean w/ organic...that just has to do w/ pesticides...clean is anything as nature intended it...no preservatives, food coloring..etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you, very good advice. I usually do about 300cal per meal, except for snacks. Snack I'll have a pear and part skimmer mozarella or triscuits and hummus. But it doesn't sem to be enough lately. I do about 1900-2100 cal a day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
then has something changed in your exercise/work/ lifestyle to create this starving sensation....unless its a form of neuropathy that keeps you from feeling full....(SUCKS) . this is a very real thing.....your body reacts to every change so good for you for not ignoring this. what are your readings? do you exp hunger w/ hi/lows?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BG is great, nothing over 6 in 2 weeks. I'm usually about 4.5-5.5 after meals. No highs in a while. I have started exercising more and I have also started to feel less stress about things in life. Trying to stay mindful and whatever happens happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh and I only feel hungy when my readings are low.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I am usually 4.5-5.5 (80-100) after meals and when I feel hungry. So it's not really "low" but for after a meal is usually higher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
yeah that is low considering you have eaten....is this more than 45 min after...i usually suggest a two hr after meal bld sgr. that's great for your a1c but not realistic for day to day living...such as being tired/light headed from hunger...making mistakes lol. at least i know that is how it is for me lol. i become a complete moron extraordinaire !!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It is usually 2 hours after. This morning for instance I had breakfast at 645, checked blood at 9am, it was 5.2. Had a snack at 930 and by 11 I was starving, I didn't check my blood though, I don't want to over do it. I ate lunch at noon and I'm starving now, it's 140pm. I will usually have a snack at 330pm. Weird thing is though i feel hungry but functional.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
BG is great, nothing over 6 in 2 weeks. I'm usually about 4.5-5.5 after meals. No highs in a while. I have started exercising more and I have also started to feel less stress about things in life. Trying to stay mindful and whatever happens happens.
what form of exercise and are you aware of all the 'rules' about exercise as in time lapse of bld sgr reaction, etc???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just walking and using the elliptical. I am not awar of any rules to exercise. Please let me know. I exercise in the evenings though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
1. Starting to Exercise
As soon as you start to exercise, a number of changes happen inside your body. First, your muscles start to work harder than they do at rest. As a result, their demand for fuel increases. Muscles use glucose and fat for fuel, just like a car uses gasoline for fuel. Second, the heart starts to beat faster to meet the increased demand for fuel by sending more nutrients through the bloodstream to the muscles. That means more glucose, fat, and oxygen, are available for the muscles. Third, the adrenal glands secrete epinephrine (adrenalin) into the bloodstream.

Epinephrine is important for two reasons:

It provides a chemical signal to the fat cells to release fat into the blood stream. This allows the fat to travel to the working muscles,

It signals the liver to release glucose into the blood stream. This will give you extra fuel when you need it. Sometimes exercise raises blood glucose because the liver is producing more glucose than you can burn.


2. Burning Glucose During Exercise
Once glucose arrives at the muscle, it must leave the bloodstream to enter the muscle. It does this by passing through special channels (sort of like toll booths into the muscle cells). These channels are usually blocked. Insulin is needed in order to open the channels so that glucose can enter.

Insulin behaves like a key to the cell. Once insulin opens the channels, glucose can flow easily into the cell. At rest, your needs for fuel are low so only a small amount of glucose enters the muscle. However, during exercise the demand for glucose rises. To meet that need, the channels become more sensitive to insulin (a natural response during exercise), which means that insulin works more efficiently so that more glucose can enter the cell. This is known as the "insulin-like effect" of exercise.

This effect is so strong that your blood glucose could drop 50, 75, or even 100 points during a vigorous workout. Of course, even moderate amounts of exercise, like a 20-30 minute walk, can lower blood glucose too. This has probably happened to you before.

3. Hypoglycemia
Let's say that you start an exercise session with a blood glucose that's already low, low normal or even normal, for example, 96 mg/dL. If you experience the "insulin-like" effect of exercise, it is very likely that you will end up hypoglycemic (blood glucose less than 70 mg/dl) during or after your workout. You probably have experienced this at one time or another. It's a real problem. Learn how your own body reacts to exercise. Check your blood glucose right before and after exercise. This is a critical step.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
1. Starting to Exercise
As soon as you start to exercise, a number of changes happen inside your body. First, your muscles start to work harder than they do at rest. As a result, their demand for fuel increases. Muscles use glucose and fat for fuel, just like a car uses gasoline for fuel. Second, the heart starts to beat faster to meet the increased demand for fuel by sending more nutrients through the bloodstream to the muscles. That means more glucose, fat, and oxygen, are available for the muscles. Third, the adrenal glands secrete epinephrine (adrenalin) into the bloodstream.

Epinephrine is important for two reasons:

It provides a chemical signal to the fat cells to release fat into the blood stream. This allows the fat to travel to the working muscles,

It signals the liver to release glucose into the blood stream. This will give you extra fuel when you need it. Sometimes exercise raises blood glucose because the liver is producing more glucose than you can burn.


2. Burning Glucose During Exercise
Once glucose arrives at the muscle, it must leave the bloodstream to enter the muscle. It does this by passing through special channels (sort of like toll booths into the muscle cells). These channels are usually blocked. Insulin is needed in order to open the channels so that glucose can enter.

Insulin behaves like a key to the cell. Once insulin opens the channels, glucose can flow easily into the cell. At rest, your needs for fuel are low so only a small amount of glucose enters the muscle. However, during exercise the demand for glucose rises. To meet that need, the channels become more sensitive to insulin (a natural response during exercise), which means that insulin works more efficiently so that more glucose can enter the cell. This is known as the "insulin-like effect" of exercise.

This effect is so strong that your blood glucose could drop 50, 75, or even 100 points during a vigorous workout. Of course, even moderate amounts of exercise, like a 20-30 minute walk, can lower blood glucose too. This has probably happened to you before.

3. Hypoglycemia
Let's say that you start an exercise session with a blood glucose that's already low, low normal or even normal, for example, 96 mg/dL. If you experience the "insulin-like" effect of exercise, it is very likely that you will end up hypoglycemic (blood glucose less than 70 mg/dl) during or after your workout. You probably have experienced this at one time or another. It's a real problem. Learn how your own body reacts to exercise. Check your blood glucose right before and after exercise. This is a critical step.
learning how to exercise with diabetes is both an art and a science :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Apparently so. Wow, I didn't know it was that difficult to exercise. Ok, so before exercise check my blood, if it's say 96, do I eat something? And check after too, I usually do have a snack after I exercise anyway. Nothing huge though. So that does explain my fasting going down a few points.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
Higher carb meals will produce a strong insulin response. This is what is causing the hunger. As Frank said add more protein and fat to decrease hunger. I rarely eat carbs in the morning just something like nuts, cheese, eggs, bacon, etc.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AnnV

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Higher carb meals will produce a strong insulin response. This is what is causing the hunger. As Frank said add more protein and fat to decrease hunger. I rarely eat carbs in the morning just something like nuts, cheese, eggs, bacon, etc.
when do you begin your carb consumption? morning snack or lunch? why do you choose to eat organic foods, pesticides?
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top