The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I thought that a small bowl of Wheaties (about 1/3 cup) with unsweetened almond milk would be OK for me.

My glucose was 87 before eating breakfast this morning, then 15 minutes after eating my glucose was 145.

Questions:

1) I guess I'm not supposed to check until an hour after eating. So could this reading be "normal"?

2) Are Wheaties off limits for most people with diabetes? I haven't been diagnosed with diabetes, just hypoglycemia.

Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
thats what happens when you eat Carbohydrates. sugar is a carb so is wheat, carbs raise BG.

for the most part dont matter what the carb is, up goes BG.

to prevent long term damage (I think you want to live a long time without complications) you want your BG to ALWAYS be under 140.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
I LOVE Wheaties. I had to give it up for breakfast. That's the bad news. The good news is that I can still manage a small bowl in the afternoon -- my most carb-tolerant time of the day. YMMV.

As diabetes86 said, below 140. Always.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,421 Posts
If you have hypoglycemia, then eating a high-carb breakfast is counterproductive. You'd be better off with fats and proteins - eggs and bacon - then cereal.

That 15 minute reading was quite revealing. Now you see that carbs are digested very quickly. When you have hypoglycemia, your pancreas will dump too much insulin in response to that high BG and it comes crashing down. Eating low carb will help you a lot in keeping you off that roller coaster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
you want your BG to ALWAYS be under 140.
Thanks, I didn't know that.

To make matters worse I'm supposed to stay away from cholesterol, dairy and oils. So that pretty much leaves me with just:

Swiss Chards
Kale
Collards
Collards greens
Beet greens
Mustard greens
Turnup greens
Napa cabbage
Cabbage
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Brussel sprouts
Cilantro
Parsley
Spinach
Broccoli
Arugula
Water
Ice

I'm going to grow hooves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
To make matters worse my doctor told me to stay away from cholesterol, dairy and oils.
*sits back to watch the fireworks*
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,421 Posts
1) I guess I'm not supposed to check until an hour after eating. So could this reading be "normal"?
Definitely not normal. And there is no law that says you can't check at 15 minutes. I think it was good you did, otherwise you may not have caught that spike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I have another question. One endocrinologist said I had "reactive postprandial hypoglycemia". I'm trying to understand the difference between diabetes and hypoglycemia. Or are they the same thing?

Are you all saying that my blood sugar goes too high, my pancreas puts out too much insulin, then my blood sugar goes too low? I suppose that's the "hypoglycemia" part.

But my dad had type 2 diabetes. He passed away because he stubbed his toe on rusty metal and didn't have a tetanus shot. So do I need to have tetanus shots? Do I likely have diabetes?

Really having a hard time understanding the difference.

Why does my blood sugar go so high and so quickly when other healthy people don't have that problem? What's the mechanism there? Just curious.

By the way, I just checked again and I'm down to 116. About 45 minutes or maybe an hour after eating.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,861 Posts
Your doctor may recommend low fat foods, but a lot of people here have had experience showing that eating low carb and higher fat foods works just fine and will lower your cholesterol.

I would try eating that way and see if you experience lows. Usually it's the highs that cause the lows, so reducing carbs all around should help. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,795 Posts
Many people have 'reactive hypoglycemia' prior to developing full blown diabetes and could avoid many of the complications if they were to choose lc/hf diets early on. You say you are not to have fats...I'd dig around in our posts about that. Unless you are allergic to dairy, I'd also give that a re-think. Many of us can't drink milk but use a lot of cream, cream cheese, cheese and other forms of dairy products and have low cholesterol. The truth is, the fats that do the damage come from our own bodies, not ingested fats. Again, read our posts and also go read Blood Sugar 101 for more information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
There is a lot of misconception out there about Diabetes Diets. Many times they tell patients to watch their sugar intake. In reality it is all carbs that you need to watch. The wheat flour in wheaties is just as dangerous as the sugar and turns to glucose just as fast. What happens with reactive hypoglycemia is when you eat carbs your pancreas still produces insulin but your cells don't recognise it and your bgs creep higher and higher. Your pancreas doesn't get the signal to shut down and produces way too much insulin which drops your bgs too fast when your cells finally let it in. Eventually this overproduction of insulin leads to beta cell burnout. That is why lots of us use low carb diets so our pancreas doesn't have to produce much insulin. In a normal non diabetic their stored insulin ( phase 1 insulin response) kicks in within minutes of eating preventing them from going high. So this isn't a normal response.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,421 Posts
both hypoglycemia and T2 diabetes are indications of impaired glucose metabolism.

Bboth of these conditions respond well to keeping the need for insulin low - by eating low-carb/high fat.

I had hypoglycemia many years before developing diabetes. If I had taken it seriously (and knew then what I know now) and stayed on a low-carb way of eating, I believe I would not have developed diabetes because I would not have put extra stress on my pancreas, since it was already not functioning normally. But hindsight is so much better than foresight.
 

·
Inactive Member
Joined
·
5,318 Posts
VeeJay said:
both hypoglycemia and T2 diabetes are indications of impaired glucose metabolism.

Bboth of these conditions respond well to keeping the need for insulin low - by eating low-carb/high fat.

I had hypoglycemia many years before developing diabetes. If I had taken it seriously (and knew then what I know now) and stayed on a low-carb way of eating, I believe I would not have developed diabetes because I would not have put extra stress on my pancreas, since it was already not functioning normally. But hindsight is so much better than foresight.
Not just hindsight. If doctors would recognize and treat hypoglycemia as "stage one diabetes" using the LCHF WOE I think many people would not advance to T2 D.

Food for thought.

Sent from my iPhone
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,421 Posts
Not just hindsight. If doctors would recognize and treat hypoglycemia as "stage one diabetes" using the LCHF WOE I think many people would not advance to T2 D.
Oh, you'll love to know what my doctor told me at that time (about 30 years ago). "Eat a Snicker's bar, or peanut-butter crackers". I did my own research and discovered that this advice was WRONG!
 

·
Inactive Member
Joined
·
5,318 Posts
VeeJay said:
Oh, you'll love to know what my doctor told me at that time (about 30 years ago). "Eat a Snicker's bar, or peanut-butter crackers". I did my own research and discovered that this advice was WRONG!
That advice is still out there. The pamphlet I got at my D ed class listed a snack of 6 ritz style crackers and peanut better as "healthy". Peanut butter? Sure. The crackers? Are you kidding me?
But like a fool I followed the advice for a couple months. Then I learned better. Like some have said, meters never lie.

Sent from my iPhone
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,076 Posts
I've known lots of hypoglycemics who always carry a Snickers bar in their pocket "just in case"!

BTW, insulin resistance may be one cause of HG (not sure) but it is not the only one and many hypoglycemics never become diabetic. Two common causes of HG you will find in the literature are EXCESSIVE insulin sensitivity (the opposite of insulin resistance) and a hyperactive pancreas (again, opposite of at least the later stages of diabetes).

In general, HG is poorly understood, has only been correctly diagnosed for about 30 years - before which it was often treated as psychosis! - and appears to have many different causes and trajectories.

Nonetheless, as others have said, in ALL of these cases the best treatment is to eat LC/HF and in most cases to each more often usually without leaving more than three waking hours between feedings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Thanks, I didn't know that.

To make matters worse I'm supposed to stay away from cholesterol, dairy and oils. So that pretty much leaves me with just:

Swiss Chards
Kale
Collards
Collards greens
Beet greens
Mustard greens
Turnup greens
Napa cabbage
Cabbage
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Brussel sprouts
Cilantro
Parsley
Spinach
Broccoli
Arugula
Water
Ice

I'm going to grow hooves.
Au contraire, mon ami. You may eat many other things, in moderation, and you may use healthful oils (olive oil, peanut oil, etc.) in food preparation. The main thing to be aware of is glycemic load (NOT glycemic index). For example, Atkins will tell you to avoid carrots, as they have a high glycemic index. However, one would need to eat much, much more than a standard serving of carrots to cause a blood-sugar spike, as the glycemic index is quite low. Same goes for watermelon and other foods; there is no need to avoid them due to outdated evidence (Atkins, again). There’s a really useful website to determine which foods are good, and which are bad, but they won’t let me post it—search google for mendosa new zealand glycemic load, and you will find it.

I hope this helps!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,632 Posts
Bad advice for me, 3 raw baby carrots takes my BG above 150 mg/dL. Won't even consider watermelon. My portion would have to be so small and I'd have to spit the melon out farther than the seed.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top