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Discussion Starter #1
I have type 2 and i really want to control it and my doctor said if i dont have a decent diet and lower my weight. I am trying to lose my weight and am trying to follow following meal plan to do so..
Breakfast: low sugar apple juice + protein powder ~ 14g carbs
snack: 100 calorie snack - atkins bar/nuts ~ 12g carbs
lunch: protein shake low carbs (slim fast, atkins etc.) 10g carbs
snack: like above ~12g carbs
dinner: protein shake with skim milk ~20g carbs


any suggestions for doing this?
 

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Personally, I think you'd do better to eat real food instead of shakes and bars and processed food. And that doesn't even seem like enough calories to support you...eating too little can be just as harmful as eating too much.

Protein and veggies are the way to go... eggs, bacon, cheese, chicken, beef, veggies w/ dip/hummus, celery w/ peanut butter, turkey & cheese rolled up, nuts. Leaving out the carbs is the most important, calories and fat aren't the bad guys. You need REAL food to nourish your body.

Yes you can lose weight eating full fat cheese, bacon, eggs, etc. Many people here have. I lost 30lbs while pregnant (not after pregnancy, during) just by eating this way to control my blood sugar. And it's not the first time I've lost weight by doing this...and yes my blood pressure and cholesterol are good. Your body needs fat...without it you don't process vegetables and meat properly.

Maybe not what you're looking for as far as advice... but I am not a fan of pseudo-food. Cutting out the junk, the processed food, the carbs, etc. and portion control is the best way to eat healthy. You don't have to eat a stick of butter and lb of bacon a day, not what I'm saying at all... but you intake more carbs/sugar/filler with low-fat/fat-free than you do with full-fat...and carbs/sugar are the enemy. We use full fat items, ground beef, plenty of cheese, but we don't eat it to excess.

Existing on shakes and bars will make you feel deprived and you will be less likely to stick to a diet like that. Eating low-carb is satisfying and tasty and the pounds will still melt away. Substitute cauliflower for rice & potatoes, zucchini & spaghetti squash for pasta/noodles... it's so good!
 

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How do you feel about real food, lioil? Would you be willing to get your protein from real meat/poultry/fish/cheese/eggs instead of protein powder? Or is the doctor the one who's selling you this protein powder? If he is, shame on him.

What has helped me lose weight AND control blood sugar is a straight simple high-fat/low-carb diet. That means lots of meat/poultry/fish/cheese/eggs, moderate amounts of real butter, mayonnaise, cream, sour cream, nuts, etc., and NO low-fat products like skim milk or fat-free yogurts etc. NO bread/potatoes/rice/cereal grains - not even whole grains. Right now you need to get serious & get strict until you get things under control.

Don't let anyone tell you that using fats in your diet will raise your cholesterol or keep you from losing weight . . . that is the biggest hoax ever perpetrated on the general public. Keep reading our boards here & you'll find the way most of us eat and it's very satisfying, altogether delicious, and above all - healthy for diabetics!

Welcome to our little corner of the world! :D


(and I promise wdmama & I aren't twins separated at birth . . . we just think a lot alike! ;))
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the quick replies! The recovery drink is actually suggested by many fitness folks from studies that the 4:1 carb protein ratio is good for after workouts. The protein shake for dinner is also kind of post exercise after work which in some way replaces(?) dinner - i am using shakeology shake mix which has a lot of nutrients as well. For lunch i could mix it up with real food like wraps or low carb stuff though. I totally understand that I can't sustain long term as a lifestyle on drinks but i think i will ease into it bit by bit once i lose a lot of weight.

@shanny
with your high fat low carb diet - can you estimate how many grams of carbs and proteins and fats you digest? I think i can throw some bacon or fats in my shakes and have some fattier sandwiches for lunch or switch around with dinner. thanks!
 

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I know that my carb intake is less than 50g per day, but for protein & fats I eat all I want. Low calorie diets are nothing but trouble when you can eat low-carb/high-fat and never go hungry.

You haven't told us any of your blood sugar readings, and I think before we get any further into this, we need to know how high you're running. What was your A1c at diagnosis? Do you have a meter & are you testing at home? Tell us what your fasting numbers are, and then what your postprandial numbers are. Please describe what kind of working out are you are going to be doing.

The decision that needs to be made is what's more important - controlling your blood sugar or losing weight? If your doctor thinks a meal-replacement diet is a "decent" diet, then I strongly disagree with him. I hope we hear from any members who have experience with this and tell us how it affects blood sugar.
 

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I have type 2 and i really want to control it and my doctor said if i dont have a decent diet and lower my weight. I am trying to lose my weight and am trying to follow following meal plan to do so..
Breakfast: low sugar apple juice + protein powder ~ 14g carbs
snack: 100 calorie snack - atkins bar/nuts ~ 12g carbs
lunch: protein shake low carbs (slim fast, atkins etc.) 10g carbs
snack: like above ~12g carbs
dinner: protein shake with skim milk ~20g carbs


any suggestions for doing this?
Unless you're around 100lbs and fairly sedentary, this is very likely NOT enough calories to support you...

I can offer more advice if you can tell us a few things:

Height
Age
Current Weight
Goal (Healthy) Weight
Activity Level (How much you exercise, etc.)

Let me know and I'll be happy to help out with some facts and figures,
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unless you're around 100lbs and fairly sedentary, this is very likely NOT enough calories to support you...

I can offer more advice if you can tell us a few things:

Height
Age
Current Weight
Goal (Healthy) Weight
Activity Level (How much you exercise, etc.)

Let me know and I'll be happy to help out with some facts and figures,
height: 5"10
age: 29
current weight: 320
activity level (not much but started doing workouts 1.5 hours a day)

i am going to see my doc next month with blood work results etc. He did have me see a nutritionist before and the nutritionist told me to keep my weight and basically showed me the food pyramid with the percentage of carbs/protein/fats etc. My doctor did tell me to lose weight since he thinks it is the biggest obstacle right now and i agree...
 

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height: 5"10
age: 29
current weight: 320
activity level (not much but started doing workouts 1.5 hours a day)

i am going to see my doc next month with blood work results etc. He did have me see a nutritionist before and the nutritionist told me to keep my weight and basically showed me the food pyramid with the percentage of carbs/protein/fats etc. My doctor did tell me to lose weight since he thinks it is the biggest obstacle right now and i agree...
OK, Here's what I think, and yes, it's one of my many walls o' text:

Diet:
Throw out the idea of the food pyramid. It's just not good science (proven, I don't make this up) and it does NOT work for diabetics or anyone with metabolic syndrome. Yes, you can still eat a balance of carbs, protein and fat, but your carbs should come from veggies (except potatoes, corn and parsnips) and perhaps from a few berries (1cup of berries is roughly 15g of carbs) at a time. I have my berries with my post-workout smoothies. Protein: Eat healthy things like chicken, fish (especially cold-water fish high in omega-3's), pork, beef, eggs, cheese etc.

If you HAVE to have some carbs, try one of the varieties of sprouted-grain breads (made without flour) or a low-carb/high-fiber tortilla (LA Tortilla Factory or Mama Lupe's) and test to see how that goes. I find I can't eat other types of grains/cereals except those.

Don't worry about FAT too much, because it's GREAT fuel for diabetics that workout (great for anyone that works out, really), and you NEED a decent amount of calories. Also, if you're trying to maintain and/or build muscle mass - you NEED dietary fat in order to maintain testosterone. Just remember that fat is higher in calories than protein or carbs, so watch that accordingly.

For example, 6oz of Eye of Round Steak (lean, low-fat steak) has 276 Calories, 7.0g FAT and 49.8g Protein... and the same 6oz of a boneless Rib Steak has 555 Calories, 49.5g FAT and 27g Protein. While the Rib steak might taste better, and fill you up more, when it comes to calories and fat content there's a huge difference. That being said, being a big guy myself I eat the Rib steak and watch the rest of my calories accordingly :)

... more about diet will follow once I talk about calories...


Caloric Intake:
You NEED more calories. I can't stress this enough... in your situation, I guarantee your body thinks it's starving, and will hold on to fat as long as possible.

Many people don't realize this, but there is a minimum threshold of calories our bodies need in order for the body to burn fat as fuel. If you don't get that minimum, your body goes into 'starvation' mode, and no matter how much you diet and exercise, without enough fuel going in, you'll lose muscle instead of fat.

At your age, height and weight you have a BMR (Base Metabolic Rate) of about 2800 calories, give or take a hundred or so depending on which formula you use. That means that if you were on 24hr a day bed-rest, you'd need that much JUST to maintain your current size. You're currently getting FAR, FAR LESS than that.

Somewhere ABOVE the BMR figure is where you need to be for minimum daily caloric intake. With adding a bit of exercise into the mix, it's likely you need about 4,000-4,500 calories a day in order to maintain. Dropping to 3,000 to 3,500 calories a day should see a drop of 1 to 2 pounds per week in bodyfat, depending upon your exercise level.

As an example, as a nearly 300lb 45 year old (slower metabolism than a 29 year old) I was taking in a little over 3,000 calories a day, working out at least an hour daily (worked it up to 2+ hours as I got in better shape) and I lost 60 pounds in 4 months. Had I tried a 1,500 calorie a day diet, I'd still be a 300lb 45 year old wondering why I couldn't lose weight...

Diet: Meals/Day:
One of the best ways to maintain good blood glucose levels and eat enough healthy calories is to have 5-6 meals per day with similar macronutrient/caloric makeup in each one. (IE: for 3,500 calories a day, if you decide to eat 5 meals a day, have 700 calories in each meal.) I change this up a little, and I currently have 3 meals and 3 snacks. The meals are roughly 650 calories, and the snacks about 450 calories each. Some days I eat a little more, some days a little less, it depends on my exercise levels. (If I do a 3hr bike ride, I'll obviously eat a little more.)

Carb Intake
:
Low-Carb is best for diabetes, period. Of course, with our caloric intake, and if doing 1.5hrs or more of exercise daily, this doesn't mean eat the same 50g of carb that a 130lb female diabetic might eat. You likely can get away with 100g of carb in a day when eating 3,000+ calories daily, but ONLY by testing will you know for sure. I currently eat anywhere from 80g-120g or carbs per day normally. On days where I bike longer, I will have more carbohydrate to help fuel that ride. But I strive to NEVER have blood glucose higher than about 6.6 (120 on the US scale) at any time, even when eating carbs, so I monitor that closely. I'm trying to have my fasting readings in the 4.5 (about 80) range and my post-prandial numbers in the 6.0 (around 105) range, but my metabolism is goofy so it doesn't always work out that way.

Fruit:
If you're going to eat fruit, do it post-workout. That way the fructose (fruit sugar), instead of raising your blood glucose, will go to replace glycogen stores depleted during exercise. Don't get too carried away with quantity without testing. I put about 1cup of mixed berries into my post-workout smoothie, and sometimes a half banana if it was a long/hard workout. (My smoothie is 1cup water, w ice cubes, 1-2 scoops no-sugar protein powder, 1 scoop glutamine, 1cup berries, 1/2 banana sometimes, a small handful of baby spinach, 4 baby carrots and 2 packets of stevia or erythritol sweetener, if you're wondering. Occasionally I get crazy and throw in 1/4 cup of heavy cream, yum.)

Sample Meals
: (This was what I ate the other day...)
Breakfast
3 Pieces Regular Sliced low-salt bacon
2 eggs scrambled, topped with 1oz melted cheese
1/2 piece Sprouted Grain bread (toast) w/ 1TBSP Peanut Butter and 1TBSP sugar-free jam
- Calories: 658. 17g Carb, 31g Protein, 50g Fat

Snack
Protein Smoothie (with 1/2 banana, as mentioned above) and handful of peanuts or almonds.
- Calories: 475. 45g Carb, 34g Protein, 19g Fat

Lunch
2cups salad w/ Caesar dressing, turkey club low-carb tortilla wrap, Sugar-Free Jello with Real Whipped cream.
- Calories: 654. 17g Carb, 40g Protein, 49g Fat

Snack
Chicken Salad lettuce wrap, broccoli and onion dip (cream-cheese dip), 1oz extra-old cheddar cheese.
- Calories: 433. 18g Carb, 42g Protein, 21g Fat

Supper
Fish in Brandi's Breading, Tartar Sauce, Salad with Vinagrette and grated parmesan.
- Calories: 662. 5g Carb, 36g Protein, 54g Fat

Snack
Carrot Cake
- Calories: 479. 11g Carb, 9g Protein, 47g Fat

If you add that up, you'll see this day was 3,361 Calories and 113g Carbohydrate. (Actually, after you subtract dietary fiber, it works out to only 93g Carbohydrate).

And yes, I'm that precise in my food measurements. I used to weigh/size everything, now I've done it long enough that I know how large a portion is for me, so I don't bother unless I'm eating something new.

I space those 6 meals out in 3 to 3.5hr intervals. This works best for me as any longer and I experience a liver dump. Of course, everybody is different and you may respond differently and be able to eat fewer meals with longer spacing in-between.

Regarding the dietary fat / cholesterol... It's important to realize that dietary cholesterol does NOT equal serum cholesterol. Many people are now finding that increasing their fat intake, especially that of healthy fats (such as in fish, nuts, olive/coconut oils, etc., etc.) is improving their overall lipid profile, by raising 'good' cholesterol levels while maintaining or lowering their 'bad' cholesterol.

Most important is to keep at the diet and exercise regime. It's a diabetes lifestyle, not a fad diet/exercise program. And remember, with the amount of great low-carb recipes out there, you can still have your treats too!

Heck, I even have the occasional (very occasional) non-diabetic meal with my family ... of course, I workout intensely before and after the meal to counter the effects. In fact, you'll likely find that you too can easily lower a high blood glucose reading simply by getting on a bicycle, going for a power-walk, or doing any kind of moderate-to-intense exercise for 15-20 minutes.

And remember, what works for me will NOT work for everyone, but the advice I've given is pretty sound for most people. Hopefully you can take what works for you, and adapt anything else you need. The most important aspect of this is testing, finding out what works for you, and keeping at it!

Good luck with it all, if you have ANY questions, keep asking the good folks here!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
wow thanks for the reply beefy. I do understand the idea of caloric deficit and that i need ~3500 calories burned for 1 pound loss so i figured eating a lot less will be good... I guess I am trying to find an "optimum" calorie balance to do so. I did look at one site saying 1400 is "minimum" for healthy male while 1200 for female.

Also, from your info on losing weight it seems you lost 15pds/month so thats like ~4pds/week which doesnt that mean somehow you lost a lot more than planned - how does one explain that? Another note (i am not trying to argue) is arent those biggest loser folks losing a ton of weight than "recommended" but seems to kept it down? i read from website that the doctor said they ate 1500 calories and just did exercise - he did note that the calorie decrease accounted for ~50%. I understand that's no way a lifestyle but i guess i am desperate since i weigh so much now...

As for the fats - does it matter where it comes from or not really? I understand trans fat (pretty much every label has that now...) is a no no.... thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
another quick note - since eating less calories reaches starvation mode aka plateau mode - is it better to find that "plateau" then work my way up?
 

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wow thanks for the reply beefy. I do understand the idea of caloric deficit and that i need ~3500 calories burned for 1 pound loss so i figured eating a lot less will be good... I guess I am trying to find an "optimum" calorie balance to do so. I did look at one site saying 1400 is "minimum" for healthy male while 1200 for female.

Also, from your info on losing weight it seems you lost 15pds/month so thats like ~4pds/week which doesnt that mean somehow you lost a lot more than planned - how does one explain that? Another note (i am not trying to argue) is arent those biggest loser folks losing a ton of weight than "recommended" but seems to kept it down? i read from website that the doctor said they ate 1500 calories and just did exercise - he did note that the calorie decrease accounted for ~50%. I understand that's no way a lifestyle but i guess i am desperate since i weigh so much now...

As for the fats - does it matter where it comes from or not really? I understand trans fat (pretty much every label has that now...) is a no no.... thanks!
Hi!

Can't speak for Beefy's experiences, 'cause I'm not him. Plus, he's athletic and I'm not.

But I do know, from pre-D experience as well as now, that a low-carb diet helps get the pounds off and keep them off.

Those of us who live low-carb tend to use real fats and shun low-fat or no-fat imitations of real food -- those foods usually have most of their nutrients removed, and replaced with sugar and carbs.

So we eat real butter, mayo, cheeses, heavy cream and the like. (Milk has carbs, and yogurt often does as well.) And we don't try to remove every bit of fat from our meats, either. Many of us do not count our fat calories.
 

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Im new here and contemplating the same subject, I have found my weight loss stalls on low caloric intake but I seem to gradually lose more weight for a prolonged time without losing muscle on a zero cab high fat diet. Should I worry about high cholesterol??
 

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Im new here and contemplating the same subject, I have found my weight loss stalls on low caloric intake but I seem to gradually lose more weight for a prolonged time without losing muscle on a zero cab high fat diet. Should I worry about high cholesterol?? Also I am not diabetic but it runs in the family so with that said, would this type of diet be suitable for me?
In my opinion, low-carb/high-fat way-of-eating is very good for lowering cholesterol and this program is absolutely suitable for everyone; diabetics & non-diabetics alike. Going zero-carb is prob'ly not the best goal because our bodies need fiber to keep functioning smoothly, but get all your carbs from high-fiber vegetables like celery, asparagus, artichokes, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hi!

Can't speak for Beefy's experiences, 'cause I'm not him. Plus, he's athletic and I'm not.

But I do know, from pre-D experience as well as now, that a low-carb diet helps get the pounds off and keep them off.

Those of us who live low-carb tend to use real fats and shun low-fat or no-fat imitations of real food -- those foods usually have most of their nutrients removed, and replaced with sugar and carbs.

So we eat real butter, mayo, cheeses, heavy cream and the like. (Milk has carbs, and yogurt often does as well.) And we don't try to remove every bit of fat from our meats, either. Many of us do not count our fat calories.
yeah going "whole fat" seems to be the trend here... But what shouldnt i go "whole fat" for? Also, isnt saturated fat really bad for you? And what is a good mark for % for low carb dieters? is 10/45/45 a good break or carb should be higher percentage?
 

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yeah going "whole fat" seems to be the trend here... But what shouldnt i go "whole fat" for? Also, isnt saturated fat really bad for you? And what is a good mark for % for low carb dieters? is 10/45/45 a good break or carb should be higher percentage?
You have my deep respect for working this out before you're forced to! Wish I'd done the same. But then, it's only recently become clear that diabetes is our Family Obligation.

There's no One True Diet ... each of us, diabetic and non-diabetic alike, must experiment and find our own best ratio.

For example, I cannot eat more than 6g of carb -- often, not even that -- at a time without my glucose levels spiking, unless I take extra insulin. Many others on the Forum can go much higher (and at least one member needs a certain amount of carbs), but I've gotta avoid carbs as much as humanly possible.

If I were to go low-carb and low-fat, I'd have almost nothing left to eat!

Not sure I understand your question about "whole fat," but I avoid man-made fats (like margarine), refined cooking oils and the like -- never liked 'em. Natural fats, however, contain vital nutrients, do not raise glucose and, according to many studies, do not raise our cholesterol. (If I misunderstood you, please let me know!)

Our obesity epidemic began around the time low-fat gained dominance. I remember it well, having just lost 50 lbs. on a modified Atkins diet just about the time Atkins was "discredited" back in the 70s! (Kept it off too, 'til I fell completely off the wagon in the late 80s. Aaaahhh, regrets ...)
 

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Thanks for the advice I have been contemplating going zero carb for a while but I seem to do better on low carb, eveyrytime I go zero carb the cravings are usually to much...so I kind of go back and forth undecided.
 

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... i figured eating a lot less will be good... I guess I am trying to find an "optimum" calorie balance to do so. I did look at one site saying 1400 is "minimum" for healthy male while 1200 for female.
1400 might be a 'minimum' for a 150lb male. When you figure in a 300lb male... you need to double it. Of course, the base requirements go down as your weight does, so it's all relative.

Also, from your info on losing weight it seems you lost 15pds/month so thats like ~4pds/week which doesnt that mean somehow you lost a lot more than planned - how does one explain that?
I lost a lot quickly (nearly 30 lbs the first month!) for two reasons: First, I easily lost 10-15 lbs of water weight once I changed my diet (Read up on ketosis/ketogenic diet to see why), and second... I tend to exercise to a ridiculous length and intensity. It's not unusual to find me exercising for 2-1/2 hrs at an intensity that most people can't maintain for 5 minutes. I'm just built that way (I'm both athletic and psycho, LOL). So some days I eat more, depending on my calculations for calories burned. Although my signature says 3,000+ calories a day, I eat as much as 4,200. With my size, muscle-mass and intensity level I typically burn around 1,200-1,400 calories per hour during a 2-3hr session. And I often exercise 2x per day. So there are days that just my exercise can burn 3,000-4,000 calories.

So with my BMR around 2,200 calories, and my activity burns an average of 3,000, that's a requirement of 5,200 calories to maintain. If I consume 3,300 calories that day, I have a deficit of 1,900 calories. Which works out to an easy 3.8lbs a week.

Because I'm in a ketogenic state, the body burns FAT during this period more than any other fuel source, which is why I can also maintain good muscle mass, or even build muscle at the same time.

Another note (i am not trying to argue) is arent those biggest loser folks losing a ton of weight than "recommended" but seems to kept it down? i read from website that the doctor said they ate 1500 calories and just did exercise - he did note that the calorie decrease accounted for ~50%. I understand that's no way a lifestyle but i guess i am desperate since i weigh so much now...
First, PLEASE don't feel desperate. The weight loss will come. I'm lucky to be able to burn fat as fast as I do. I have a very active metabolism that most folks don't enjoy. If you can feel healthy while losing 4lbs a week, that's awesome. If you can only lose 1-2lbs a week and feel healthy, that's awesome too. (Remember, a pound a week is over 50lbs a year! It adds up!)

When it comes to diabetes, I really believe the important thing isn't HOW MUCH/HOW FAST you lose weight, but that you eat a healthy low-carb diet and exercise daily to lose weight at the speed your body wants. The combination of low-carb and daily exercise will give you the fastest control of your BG levels... the weight loss, as it comes, will also improve things like insulin resistance, etc.

Regarding 'The Biggest Loser' ... There's a few things to consider... Being on the reality show becomes their full-time job. They're given all the tools and time to get into fantastic shape. At the end of it they're sent back home, and it's just NOT easy to maintain that kind of lifestyle unless your family, friends, work, etc., are supportive of it (and conducive to it). Unfortunately, many biggest loser contestants (but not all) do eventually gain weight back.

You'll notice during the first weeks of the show that larger men are losing 14, 16, 20 (even 30+) pounds in a single week... This will continue to happen for about a month, then it slows down. This weight is mostly water, and sometimes muscle. (Severely obese people usually have more muscle mass than they realize, simply because the body needs that much muscle to move them around...) Once their excess water is gone, and they get their diets working best, they still lose a great deal of weight simply because they're working out 5 or 6 or more hours a day. Most folks can't do that, that's why they pull larger numbers than normal.

As for the fats - does it matter where it comes from or not really? I understand trans fat (pretty much every label has that now...) is a no no.... thanks!
There are certain fats that are healthier than others. Some fats are GREAT for heart health/cholesterol levels, etc. Trans fats are bad, yes. Anything with the word "hydrogenated", even 'partially-hydrogenated' you want to avoid.

Saturated fats aren't necessarily bad, it depends on the type and amount. Coconut oil is technically a saturated fat, but is one of the healthier ones. My steak contains saturated fat, but only a small percentage of it's fat is saturated, so it's not as bad as some would have you think.

Healthy fats include:

  • coconut/coconut oil
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Dark (70% + cocoa) Chocolate (cocoa butter is healthy!)
  • Avocados/Guacamole
  • Fatty Fish (Salmon, Sardines, Mackerel, Herring, Trout, etc.)
  • Nuts - any and all
  • Seeds, including pumpkin, sunflower, sesame and especially flax
  • animal fat from organically raised, free-range animals
Avoid 'refined' fats. Most oils on your supermarket shelves are refined, even most of the so-called “healthy” canola oils. Most refined oils still undergo the high-temperature, high-pressure, solvent extraction, bleaching, and deodorizing processes. Anything labeled vegetable oil, soybean oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, safflower oil, and even many canola oils have been damaged by this refining process (unless they say "virgin" or "cold expeller pressed"). This damages the natural structure of the fats, destroys natural antioxidants, creates free radicals, and produces a generally unhealthy product.
 

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yeah going "whole fat" seems to be the trend here... But what shouldnt i go "whole fat" for? Also, isnt saturated fat really bad for you? And what is a good mark for % for low carb dieters? is 10/45/45 a good break or carb should be higher percentage?
Instead of striving for a certain percentage (which isn't easy) try instead to 'count' your carbs. That's the most important thing for diabetics trying to control their sugars. Then for the rest of your protein/fat requirements, just eat fresh, unprocessed product as much as possible and you'll be doing well.
 

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Okay thanks, so is there an ideal low carb diet that is not a zero carb diet so you lose weight but not be on a ketogenic diet?
 
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