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I was diagnosed T1 06.13.2011 at age 33. Completely devastated by the news, I've spent the past 6-7 weeks educating myself, and searching for a solid endocrinologist(0 for 2 so far). I have a new toy(dexcom 7). I've also visited a diabetes educator, which was helpful. Finally, I plan to participate in a clinical trial using an immunosuppressant in an attempt to preserve some beta cells. What I'm struggling with the most is how isolating this disease is. Almost everything social that I used to enjoy... happy hour, eating at restaurants that do not publish nutrition information, long distance running, ALL seem at odds with my long term well being. I'm not keen on developing complications, but managing this disease is exhausting and isolating. Does this get easier?

If I were diagnosed in my youth, or was a parent of a diagnosed youth, there seems to be no shortage of camps and support groups to help the newly diagnosed cope. As a newly diagnosed adult, I'm unable to find similar support. It would be therapeutic to meet with others who share my condition. Any advice/tips?
 

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This forum is about as close as many of us get, but don't sell it short - the support here is strong and enduring.

Many of us are acquainted with other diabetics, but often they aren't as committed as we, to gaining tight control, since their doctors preach the ADA gospel of carbs being necessary & glucose levels of 180 (10.0) being safe and acceptable. That being the case, how would they know otherwise? They become totally overwhelmed trying to find success employing the contradictory medical advice; they may finally hear about us or stumble across the forum while trying to find some sort of solution online; and finally the simple truth comes to light.

If you can envision the kind of loving care & support you seek coming from people you'll likely never meet face-to-face, settle in here & get better acquainted. We take really good care of one another & I think if you read through our threads, you'll see that it shows.

Check this thread started by one of our long-term type 1s just this week - Things to Consider
 

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Our journeys are all different, nobody can share them exactly, but that's true for most things in life. But I can tell you that coming here, tapping into the information and support that is DF, was the greatest help in giving me the tools to manage my diabetes.

You said most everything you used to enjoy isn't healthy - but there's no reason you can't enjoy those things. I used to love a cold brew or two, margaritas were a personal favorite, and I made awesome liqueurs (a few none of you have ever tasted, old European familial recipes). I have a virtual distillery in the attic. Diabetes put an end to that, but I still enjoy drinks on patios at the beach, only I have a glass of red wine instead. It's okay. After all, if we make the point of Happy Hour the exact beverage we used to drink, then maybe it's time to ask ourselves: what's more important, the exact beverage or the environs and company?

Eating out I've found is easier than I could've imagined. As a T1 your issues are different from mine, but we're the same in that if we don't know what's in it we just don't eat it! I had lunch a few weeks ago with a friend at a restaurant where it seemed there was =nothing= on the menu for me. Really didn't want a garden salad. So, I asked the waitress if they had raw spinach. Yes. Could I have a reuben please, but put the kraut and corned beef and gruyere on a bed of spinach and hold the bread.

Well - I got a magnificent plate! It was a huge pile of kraut on spinach, topped w/ grilled corn beef smothered in melted gruyere. It was far more food than would have been in a sandwich - I took half of it home. Thing is, chefs hate to send out meager-looking plates. When you ask them to delete an item vs working around it, they compensate. Boy do they!

I realize as a T1 our issues are different, but the commonality is that there are work-arounds for almost everything.

It becomes a habit. Things are new now and you have to spend so much time learning. Once that curve is behind you it'll be (relatively) smooth sailing. Promise.
 
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I have T1.5 and it was all up to ME to to get antibody testing and show it was not straight-up T2! Support seems not to come much out of the medical community, either -- you have to chase down your own.

I have found more help on the forum than anywhere else.

Welcome, and tell us what you are doing -- eating, exercising, and use of meds.
 

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I also have Type 1 although my diagnosis was what seems like a long time ago (4-2003). And you're right, there does not seem to be much in the way of adult support groups for Type 1. One thing I can tell you though is you are not alone in your feelings of utter bewilderment and isolation. I've found the biggest share of 'support' from online diabetes forums.

Don't give up on the things that you enjoyed before diagnosis. You can still do those things with modification. You're young and you have a lot of life ahead of you. You will get through this time period - I promise.
 

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I was diagnosed T1 when I was just shy of my 53rd birthday. Quite shocking! Once I adjusted to the fingersticks and injections, however, I found I was able to do all the things I did pre-diagnosis. I have an active social life, love to cook and entertain, hike, canoe, travel.....it all works just fine. Have I had to make some modifications? Yes! But I'll not let diabetes define what I can or can't do.

A note on dining out. Perhaps it's just me, but I don't think it's necessary to get detailed nutritional data on the foods you order. It takes some common sense and good humor, but you can always eat well. Like Moon, I've turned restaurant menus on their heads with my special requests, but the servers have always been helpful and cooks have been really accomodating. And I always tip well for the extra consideration!

Jen
 

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Hello, welcome aboard!

It is good to research, there is much you can learn on Google and on these websites. A good endo is hard to find. I was diagnosed in 1945, when I was 6, and did not have an endo until 2007. Since I was diagnosed at a young age, it was easier for me to adjust. I did not know other diabetics though, and there were no computers, or diabetes groups. My first real contact was online in 2006. If you contact your local JDRF chapter, you may find some type 1 groups. There are some type 1 groups that hold monthly meetings in some of the larger cities. Maybe some of the cities near you would have a type 1 group. Texas has a lot of large cities.

Your diabetes may seem difficult now, but hang in there and give it time. Learn all that you can and put the new knowledge to good use. Education and patience will get you to a point when it will all seem very routine. My type 1 has not kept me from accomplishing the important goals in my life. You can have a long, healthy life with diabetes.

Richard
 
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