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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Unlike the regular potato, the sweet potato is said to be kind to the diabetic community. It has been my experience too - it does not spike my BG to any dangerous levels when consumed in reasonable quantities. We quite frequently make curries with it and the one that I especially like is the curry with both sweet potato and butternet squash. Once in a while, we also make sweet potato chips. Today my wife made some. Here is a picture. I don't eat chips with a spoon; the teaspoon is shown to give you an idea of the size of the plate and through it the quantity of chips that I consume once in a while with my evening tea. Can anybody "guesstimate" the amount of carbs in the quantity of sweet potato chips shown in the picture? This quantity hardly raises my BG.

My wife cut the raw sweet potatoes into chips of the size shown in the picture. She then fried it in coconut oil. During frying she sprinkled a few drops of salt water (water with a little table salt dissolved in it) to bring out the flavour of the sweet potato. This is all there is to the recipe of sweet potato chips. Hope you make and enjoy sweet potato chips once in a while.

Regards,
Rad
 

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I think sweet potato is one of the things that work different from one person to another.
In the beginning of my life with diabetes, sweet potoes didn`t spike my BG, but now I can`t eat more than a spoon with mashed sweet potatoes before my BG starts to climb.
But it really sounds great!
 

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Those are beautiful! I haven't tried making chips, but I have two lovely sweet potatoes on the counter right now. Maybe I won't bake 'em after all! ;)

About all I can say about the nutrition is that NutritionData says that one ounce contains 6g carbs & 1g fiber. I just weighed one of the beauties I have here, and it weighed 14 oz.
 

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Unlike the regular potato, the sweet potato is said to be kind to the diabetic community. It has been my experience too - it does not spike my BG to any dangerous levels when consumed in reasonable quantities. We quite frequently make curries with it and the one that I especially like is the curry with both sweet potato and butternet squash. Once in a while, we also make sweet potato chips. Today my wife made some. Here is a picture. I don't eat chips with a spoon; the teaspoon is shown to give you an idea of the size of the plate and through it the quantity of chips that I consume once in a while with my evening tea. Can anybody "guesstimate" the amount of carbs in the quantity of sweet potato chips shown in the picture? This quantity hardly raises my BG.

My wife cut the raw sweet potatoes into chips of the size shown in the picture. She then fried it in coconut oil. During frying she sprinkled a few drops of salt water (water with a little table salt dissolved in it) to bring out the flavour of the sweet potato. This is all there is to the recipe of sweet potato chips. Hope you make and enjoy sweet potato chips once in a while.

Regards,
Rad
Beautiful! I'm new to sweet potatoes, but, like Shanny, I have a couple in the kitchen right now and would love to try this recipe. Question: Do you peel the sweet potatoes before you slice them or do you leave the skin on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Beautiful! I'm new to sweet potatoes, but, like Shanny, I have a couple in the kitchen right now and would love to try this recipe. Question: Do you peel the sweet potatoes before you slice them or do you leave the skin on?
Yes, my wife peels away the skin using a knife - actually more of cutting away at the skin level because it does not peel off easily like in the case of the potato.

Regards,
Rad
 
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