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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry guys but I have to vent when things like yesterday come around.
My wife works at an apartment complex and a tenant moved out yesterday. They left some items there and among them was several NEW boxes of test strips, from what my wife indicated, likely a 3 month supply! The maintenance guy found a new meter & case outside on the ground!

Likely what that means is the tenant has D and is not testing/taking care of that D... There is an older D lady that lives there in not so good finances, believe the manager is going to see if she can make use of the strips.
My advice to everyone is take care of yourself, depending on the doc for that care is a bad substitute.

/ Rant off back to normal programming
 

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Hopefully it means their insurer no longer covers that brand, or for some other reason they moved on to a different brand .... hopefully.
 

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Unfortunate for the tenant who moved out, but if an elderly person with diabetes who cannot afford test strips could make use of them, then I say they were left and found for a reason. Perhaps this elderly woman needs them more than the person who left them. Considering the cost of those strips, I'm surprised someone would just leave them. Ashame that some people stay in denial about their diabetes. But, with that said, nobody really knows why they were left behind. Perhaps the person who moved wasn't the diabetic and had no idea? Many different scenario's playing in my head on this one. But, if they can be put to good use, then I say carpe diem!
 
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They could always be leftover from a deceased parent or other loved one they were caring for or something like that, too. A lot of survivors don't know what to do with medical supplies and often do nothing or throw them away instead of donating them for someone who needs them.
 

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I buy all my own strips so I value every strip. But my BIL is on Tri Care Military Insurance and he tells me he has so many strips because they keep sending them to him whether he needs them or not. I do think that is how people end up with extra strips. I'm glad someone could use the extra strips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Looks like the 'find' will help at least one person. The manager contacted the previous tenant and advised them of what was left. The tenant said 'just throw them away, don't use'... In cleanup they also found another brand new meter in the box, unopened.
So the one tenant that can use the strips/meter will get a brand new setup :target:

The forum members here all take pretty good care of themselves, unfortunately there are many D people that do not. Those who don't (denial) really make me shake my head :nono:
At least for me lowering carbs, TESTING and taking meds works well to keep the A1C at a good level. Not really difficult but ignoring the problem will not make it go away.
 

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LarryT, I so agree with you. It is not the most pleasant thing to have to poke fingers many times a day, but I'd rather feel the pain then to not have those digits to poke! Or, worse case scenario, be 6 feet under pushing daisies! Sometimes the insulin shot burns, or hurts, or bleeds because you hit a capillary, but again, better than losing eye sight, kidney's failing, losing extremities, or the world of other bad stuff that can happen if left unchecked or ignored. I'm very happy that an elderly person (who is most likely on a fixed income) can use the left behind goodies. Love to hear stories of others caring for others. Shows that there is still hope in this world!
 

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I don't think anyone knows for sure whether the abandoned testing gear belonged to the departed tenant, or why it was abandoned in the first place. What I get from this is a good feeling because the gear went to someone who needed it, and will use it.

That said, I find myself biting my lip a lot. Most of the diabetics I know in real life do not do much, if anything, about control. Selfishly speaking, this makes life a tad tougher for those of us who do work at it. Our efforts are not taken seriously, or are subject to disbelief. We may look like absolute loons. Stereotypes are perpetuated. Etc., etc., etc.

On the other hand, for me to join the Health Police would be utterly counter-productive. For one thing, I react ... errr ... poorly, myself, when confronted by Health Police. Even when they're absolutely correct. (Or is that, especially when they're absolutely correct?)

It's hard to watch people hurting themselves. But it's even harder to watch when I know my unwanted advice pushed someone further away from help. Been there. Often. But not (so far) with anything involving diabetes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Shalynne, HA HA HA - You and I are pretty similar in reaction to the Health Police :)
In some circumstance (like a holiday) I'll ahead of time (a day or so) lower my carbs for a splurge, I fully know it is better not to but...

A couple of years ago I noticed a coworker testing, early morning before work. Just after he had eaten a breakfast sandwich... I didn't say anything, I know in my case confrontation likely would not be a wise thing. A few days later some of the workers were talking about D and FBG testing. That was my opening, to explain that to me, FBG must be done BEFORE any thing enters the mouth that could 'skew' the results. Then I got in the plug that FBG was not the only consideration, although many docs seem to think so. I avoided any direct confronting and did notice he started testing before eating the quick shop breakfast sandwich, well 50% isn't bad :confused:

The manager at the apartment complex is pretty savvy about D, her son was diagnosed T1 in his youth and is now an adult. Have not talked with him but from conversations with the manager he has good control and she knows exactly what is good/bad A1C results. All things considered everything 'worked out well' at least for the elderly lady that is on a fixed income.
 
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