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Hello everyone and Happy New Year!

I am tired of poking my fingers to test, and I am considering a meter that I can read by phone or a transmitter, that I can check my sugar all day. Im new to this style of testing and was wondering if there is a better one than another, that someone can recommend?

Thank you!
 

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Happy New Year to you too!

I started using a CGM (continuous glucose monitor) a couple of months ago and cannot say enough good things about it. It's brilliant!

There are 3 options. Medtronics which is fairly universally not liked (okay, despised by many), Libre and Dexcom. I chose Dexcom and am very glad I did. It's more expensive but my insurance (Medicare) covered either so that wasn't a factor.

The Libre is a 14-day sensor one wears on the back of one's arm and scans whenever one wants a reading. It does not need calibrating and is not capable of it. It's great for a thriftier option or if one does not need high/low alerts and mostly for getting as many readings as one is inclined to scan for without finger pricks.

The Dexcom has a 10-day sensor, also does not need calibrating but is capable of it so if a sensor is acting wonky, one can calibrate against a meter and this can bring the sensor back in line. Dexcom reads glucose (via interstitial fluid as does the Libre, which lags blood glucose by approx 15 minutes) every 5 minutes - no need to scan. So when you wake up in the morning you can see the graph of what your glucose was doing all night. And after eating, you can monitor or later check the direct impact and curve of the meal over time. Same with exercise.

Dexcom alerts via sound and vibration if glucose goes out of range you set so if you have issues with lows at night it will wake you so you can correct.

Both work best when blood glucose is not undergoing rapid and dramatic swings. The Libre is not as good/accurate with lows as the Dexcom but both are similarly accurate.

Neither is perfect, just as meters are not. But what I have learned the last couple of months has been invaluable and nothing I could have learned without 50-100 finger sticks/day! It has changed how I bolus my insulin, gives me constant and often surprising feedback, and I now cannot imagine diabetes life without it.
 

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The only option for me was the Libre. I tried a few sensors but did not like it. I think it does not work well enough compared with the meter.

In my case, I have a lot of experience interpreting the readings of my blood glucose meter and I get better results witj the meter.

The Libre induced me to makevwrong decisions several times. After a while, I started to use the Libre together with the meter, but then I do not think I want to use two systems, so I stick to the meter.

This experience with the Libre was 3 or 4 years ago.
 

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Dexcom G6

I love my Dexcom. The fact that it takes a reading every 5 minutes allows me and my diabetes team to better adjust my dosage on my insulin pump to fine tune my settings. It also allows me to see and predict what my blood sugar will be.

I do not know much about the Libre system. The way it was explained to me was that if I wanted a reading, I would have to scan the sensor. I like to know what my blood sugar is doing at all times. That would not work for me.I suffer from not being able to feel my lows and therefor rely on my Dexcom to tell me. If it wasn't for the low alert, I would pas out.

There is also another system like the Dexcom only it uses a sensor that is planted by the doctor under your skin... EverSense CGM (eversense dot com). My niece uses this one and loves it. The transmitter is rechargeable unlike the Dexcom's but you do have to go to the doctor's every 30 days (I think) to have the sensor replaced.

What ever choice you make, moving to a CGM is an awesome move to make.
 

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Dexcom G6 is the way to go. My son is T1D and away at college, hundreds of miles. I get his CGM status and alerts. It is supposed to last 10 days but always seems to go wonky on day 8 or 9, with gaps in the data. Dexcom replaces those sensors for free, as long as you report and share data with them. They do encounter what they call "compression lows" - a false positive - it happens when lying down, and the graph drops immediately, like 200 points in 25 minutes. He rolls over and it goes right back up just as fast. Fairly easy to identify with little practice. Beyond that, near zero other complaints!

We also got him some Flic devices to send quick status messages. If it is 2AM, and he is at 50, we dont have to call him to see if he is ok. He presses the flic once, and it sends me a SMS text message saying he is aware of it and taking care of the low. No need to text 100 words without your glasses on. Just push a button. Easy to set up scripts to do whatever, and each button can hold 3 unique commands.
Scripts are super easy to create. Takes classic 2032 coin batteries. Flic.io (I think) I have not tried yet, but you may even script them to make your cell phone dial 911 for you. Have to test that....
Good luck!
 

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There are basically two CGMS out there.
If you experience highs or lows that you are not aware of until you take a BG then you should check out the Dexcom G6. It can transmit to its receiver and a phone. You can set the receiver and/or phone to alarm if glucose is rising/falling quickly, or is too low or too high. I am a heavy sleeper, and the receiver wakes me up. You can easily get tired of the alarms, but it is worthwhile.

If you just want to replace the finger prick then the Libre FreeStyle may be a good fit. You will not get alarms, but you can get readings by simply moving a device over the sensor.

Note: in both styles, you must insert a sensor wire into the skin. I find it hurts less than a finger prick (the sensors are usually around the belly or on the upper arms - see the mfg info for details), and once a week or every two weeks 1 stick is pretty good.
 

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Dexcom G6 is the way to go. My son is T1D and away at college, hundreds of miles. I get his CGM status and alerts. It is supposed to last 10 days but always seems to go wonky on day 8 or 9, with gaps in the data. Dexcom replaces those sensors for free, as long as you report and share data with them. They do encounter what they call "compression lows" - a false positive - it happens when lying down, and the graph drops immediately, like 200 points in 25 minutes. He rolls over and it goes right back up just as fast. Fairly easy to identify with little practice. Beyond that, near zero other complaints!

We also got him some Flic devices to send quick status messages. If it is 2AM, and he is at 50, we dont have to call him to see if he is ok. He presses the flic once, and it sends me a SMS text message saying he is aware of it and taking care of the low. No need to text 100 words without your glasses on. Just push a button. Easy to set up scripts to do whatever, and each button can hold 3 unique commands.
Scripts are super easy to create. Takes classic 2032 coin batteries. Flic.io (I think) I have not tried yet, but you may even script them to make your cell phone dial 911 for you. Have to test that....
Good luck!
Eversense sensors don’t suffer from Dexcoms accuracy issues. Plus, they last up to 180 days with no external protrusion. The new sensor coming from Senseonics has a lower MARD value than Med, abbot and Dexcom. And studies have shown it gets more accurate the longer it is used.
 

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There are basically two CGMS out there.
There are actually at least 5 CGMs. Medtronic Guardian. Freestyle Libre. G6/7. Eversense. Nutrisense. And sugar beats. Those last 2 are not classified as medical devices However. Sugar beats is non invasive. It uses nano tech to extract interstitial fluid through the pores in your skin. A company called Meta Materials is working on both a glucose meter and CGM that uses radio frequencies to measure glucose. So also non invasive.
 

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Hello, Daviddavid! Welcome to our site!

I see you're pretty knowledgeable about CGMs. They're a topic of some interest here, as you've probably already discovered. Do you use one yourself? Could we invite you to make a post introducing yourself in our New Member Introductions forum?
 
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