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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Three of the past five days ive been having night sweats(bed literally soaked), well last night i found out why. I live a moderately strict low carb lifestyle with exercise 5-6 days per week. Last night at 845 pm my BS was 82(a little low to be close to bed time, but i rolled with it). At 9 pm i went through my normal routine BP meds, 25 units of lantus,fish oil,biotin, ALA, etc. At 10 PM i bent over to plug in the iphone raised up and instantly knew something was wrong. Checked BS, it was 33, checked again it was 38,sent wife to get soda from downstairs. By the time she returned(15 seconds) my BS was 29, by this time i was sweating profusely. The soda and peanut raided me up to 108 after about an hour. I never knew being low was such a horrible feeling. I actually had to have wifey shake me to keep me woke while i consumed sugars.

My breakfast was 4 hardboiled eggwhites, lunch was tuna with mayo, and dinner was 2 porkchops sauted in coconut oil. Exercise from 330 to 5 pm was 25 minutes on the eliptical and 2, 20 minutes on the stationary bike, and 3 sets on the ab lounger
 

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When I hit lows like that I can't even check my sugar the ol' man has to do it for me and has to help hold the glass for me to drink out of because I'm shaking so badly, disoriented and weak. After wards, when I get it back up, I'm really crapped out for a while.
And yes, the sweats I soak whatever I'm wearing.
I also get a horrible cramping in my stomach.
 

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I would talk to your doctor about either reducing your Insulin or maybe splitting it into two doses, night and morning. Does this always happen after you inject your nightly insulin. The other thing I have heard of, is that once in awhile with Lantus if you inject it in a vein all the insulin hits at once. You may also want to decrase your exercise for awhile or eat a few more carbs after exercise to compensate. Although many of us eat low carb 30-40 a day, it seems you are eating almost no carbs. Since you are on insulin I think you could handle a few more carbs from veggies , nuts or seeds or even a few WASA crackers . It seems you are not eating enough calories.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was putting my body back into ketosis is why there was no veggies in my diet. this is the first time its happened. And u can best believe i will add a bedtime snack with a few carbs to compensate for nighttime lows.
 
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hi BananaBlack.... I know the experience as have been having a lot of hypos at night. I've been advised to drop the Lantus units. They recommended dropping a minimum of 4 units at a time until you find the right dosage. Then you increase by 1 unit at a time until you get the right dosage. I'm still trying to iron it out myself. I only take 17 units of Lantus usually... but the weather here changed to being cold and I started having the hypos every night. I was told that the cold usually means your body doesn't require as much insulin as it is not heat stressed. I initially dropped my dosage to 12 units (5 unit drop) and I was getting high BGLs during the day.... so I've increased to 13 units and now I'm going too low at times... :( This sure gets frustrating! I wish you well with finding the right balance as I know it's not easy... but you want to avoid having those hypos.... you'll need to keep quick acting carb near your bed from now on by the sounds of things.
 

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You can stay in Ketosis and still eat veggies. The trick is to add fat. Have you read Dr Bernstein's Diabetes Solutions. It is a great guidebook to doing low carb while being diabetic. He explains how to adjust your insulin and other meds while going low carb. If I remember the book, Dr B. takes his long acting Insulin 3 times a day to manage it better.
 

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I keep three or four packets of sugar next to my bed at all times. Getting out of bed to get a glass of juice is just too risky. Within 10 minutes of taking a packet or two of sugar I begin to feel in control again. I even carry three packs of sugar with me at ALL times whenever I leave the house. Had low sugar once when I was driving on the thruway with no exit in sight. I could have crashed, I was very lucky. The occassional spike from the sugar dosen't bother me concidering the alternative.
I'm 61 years old and been a type 2 diabetic for over twenty years. Been taking humalog 75/25 and Levemir for ten of those years. A1c 6.5. I'm still here and plan to be for awhile anyway. For me it's the long run that counts, I don't get too exicited over an occassional high glucose level. By occassional I mean two or three times a month max of 250.
Good Luck
Gregg
 

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Welcome aboard, Gregg . . . I hope you'll be able to visit often & get better acquainted. Thank you for joining us! :D
 

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I've had many low sugar attacks, and talk about sweating! It's horrible, and I shake so badly I can barely stand up. I make sure I eat a little something before I go to bed and that works for me. However, I'm usually way too high on the sugar numbers. I'm having a very hard time giving up some foods that I love.
 

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Rosa:
One of the things I did when I first found out I was diabetic was to keep accurate records, ie. day, time, reading, insulin dosage and a place for comments. For me this is a means of controlling my sugar. After I got a month or two of data I could look back and see trends. Over a period of time I was able to predict my glucose reading fairly accurately for just about any time of the day or night.
If you are able or know someone who could set up a simple spreadsheet on the computer to record this data I think you would find that it is not really that difficult to keep track of this data.
Hope this helps
Are you on insulin ? I love insulin...I prefer it over oral medications.

Gregg
 

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Rosa:
One of the things I did when I first found out I was diabetic was to keep accurate records, ie. day, time, reading, insulin dosage and a place for comments. For me this is a means of controlling my sugar. After I got a month or two of data I could look back and see trends. Over a period of time I was able to predict my glucose reading fairly accurately for just about any time of the day or night.
If you are able or know someone who could set up a simple spreadsheet on the computer to record this data I think you would find that it is not really that difficult to keep track of this data.
Hope this helps
Are you on insulin ? I love insulin...I prefer it over oral medications.

Gregg
Hi Gregg, Nice of you to post to me. Yes, I'm on insulin and pills. I was really bad today. I'm having an awful time staying away from the foods I love, esp. pasta. Had to use Novolog twice today, but it does bring my sugar down. My other insulin is Lantus SoloStar. Then I have Metformin & glipizide (if I spelled that correctly). Surprisingly, we had ravioli for supper but my sugar only went to 169. Then - I had too many cinnamon graham crackers and had a high reading; it was then I used the Novolog. I'm not good at denying myself. Talk to you soon; it sounds like you're doing well :)

Rosa
 

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Hi Rosa! The key is taking your insulin BEFORE you eat. Afterwards is pretty tough to do correctly if you ask me. If you figure out how many carbs are in the food you are about to eat (and of course pasta and crackers should probably not be on your diet, but you already know that), you then take your insulin 20 minutes before eating. Your insulin takes a bit of time to get to the right level to match the carbs that hit your system when you eat. If you time it correctly, you will not see as big of spikes as you do today.

On the other hand, if you wait until your blood sugar is already high, you have no clue if it has peaked yet, so you could take too much or too little insulin. Better to be proactive rather than reactive.

If you are not sure of how many carbs are in certain foods, try getting The Calorie King book. It not only has common foods that you eat, but also lists restaurants, etc.

If you cannot control your urges, you have to at least get your insulin usage in check. This will help minimize the damage your diet could be doing to you. Of course, eating healthy is preferred and it is not ideal to use your insulin as a crutch, but if you are not able to manage your diet yet, this will help you keep your limbs longer :)

On that note...

Cheers!

Jeremy
 
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Rosa,

One more thing. What is your insulin to carb ratio? Meaning, how much insulin are your giving yourself?

Cheers!

Jeremy
 

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Hi Rosa! The key is taking your insulin BEFORE you eat. Afterwards is pretty tough to do correctly if you ask me. If you figure out how many carbs are in the food you are about to eat (and of course pasta and crackers should probably not be on your diet, but you already know that), you then take your insulin 20 minutes before eating. Your insulin takes a bit of time to get to the right level to match the carbs that hit your system when you eat. If you time it correctly, you will not see as big of spikes as you do today.

On the other hand, if you wait until your blood sugar is already high, you have no clue if it has peaked yet, so you could take too much or too little insulin. Better to be proactive rather than reactive.

If you are not sure of how many carbs are in certain foods, try getting The Calorie King book. It not only has common foods that you eat, but also lists restaurants, etc.

If you cannot control your urges, you have to at least get your insulin usage in check. This will help minimize the damage your diet could be doing to you. Of course, eating healthy is preferred and it is not ideal to use your insulin as a crutch, but if you are not able to manage your diet yet, this will help you keep your limbs longer :)

On that note...

Cheers!

Jeremy
Jeremy, thank you! I've wondered if the insulin would do me better if I took it before I ate. I'm going to do that starting tomorrow and keep track of my numbers. I thought graham crackers would be all right - guess I was mistaken. I keep seeing people posting about cinnamon - is that good for diabetics?

I go for blood work later on (it's now about 2:16 a.m.). It's my 3-month checkup, not gonna be good :( Talk to you tomorrow and I appreciate the information you posted. I have much to learn yet.

Hugs,
Rosa
 

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Cinnamon is good for you, but sprinkled with sugar on a delicious cracker negates it's "good for you" attributes :)

A general rule for you should be to not have anything made with flour, sugar, rice, etc. You can still eat a delicious meal. Shanny recently posted a great post listing some things to eat. She had suggested something like eggs and ham (or bacon or sausage) for breakfast, chicken or tuna salad with full fat mayo and hard boiled eggs for lunch, pork chop, steak or chicken breast and a nice green salad or tossed salad for dinner with sugar free jello for dessert. Snacks to include cheese sticks, pepperoni, a handful of nuts, etc. This type of diet will eliminate the need for as much insulin for you. As Shanny had stated, with this type of diet, you can still eat like a King! Or Queen in your case :) If you occasionally eat something with carbs, you take enough Novolog to keep your BGL low. Your Lantus should keep you on track through the day as your foundation insulin...or your baseline (if confusing I can explain in more detail).

In terms of diet, after a week of eating that way, you will find your cravings will decrease, you will get more energy and hopefully will be able to resume walking for some exercise in the near future.

Let us know how you are figuring out your insulin doses today. Also, how much Lantus are you taking daily and when do you take it? While none of us can replace your doctor, we can at least give you some basic insulin regimen guidelines. Insulin is a fantastic treatment if used correctly, but can quickly become a crutch allowing you to eat detrimental foods if you are not careful. If you get your insulin therapy under control and scale back your carb intake, you will see a dramatic difference in your BGL control.

I know this seems like quite a bit of information or guidelines and at first it is certainly harder to do than what you are doing today, but in the long run, you will be healthier, you will feel great and it will all become second nature.

Anyway, hope your appointment goes well today! Take care, we are all here for you!

Cheers,

Jeremy
 
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Cinnamon is good for you, but sprinkled with sugar on a delicious cracker negates it's "good for you" attributes :)

A general rule for you should be to not have anything made with flour, sugar, rice, etc. You can still eat a delicious meal. Shanny recently posted a great post listing some things to eat. She had suggested something like eggs and ham (or bacon or sausage) for breakfast, chicken or tuna salad with full fat mayo and hard boiled eggs for lunch, pork chop, steak or chicken breast and a nice green salad or tossed salad for dinner with sugar free jello for dessert. Snacks to include cheese sticks, pepperoni, a handful of nuts, etc. This type of diet will eliminate the need for as much insulin for you. As Shanny had stated, with this type of diet, you can still eat like a King! Or Queen in your case :) If you occasionally eat something with carbs, you take enough Novolog to keep your BGL low. Your Lantus should keep you on track through the day as your foundation insulin...or your baseline (if confusing I can explain in more detail).

In terms of diet, after a week of eating that way, you will find your cravings will decrease, you will get more energy and hopefully will be able to resume walking for some exercise in the near future.

Let us know how you are figuring out your insulin doses today. Also, how much Lantus are you taking daily and when do you take it? While none of us can replace your doctor, we can at least give you some basic insulin regimen guidelines. Insulin is a fantastic treatment if used correctly, but can quickly become a crutch allowing you to eat detrimental foods if you are not careful. If you get your insulin therapy under control and scale back your carb intake, you will see a dramatic difference in your BGL control.

I know this seems like quite a bit of information or guidelines and at first it is certainly harder to do than what you are doing today, but in the long run, you will be healthier, you will feel great and it will all become second nature.

Anyway, hope your appointment goes well today! Take care, we are all here for you!

Cheers,

Jeremy
Jeremy, you're a keeper :) You're very helpful. I take 32 units of Lantus 2/day. Novolog as needed. Plus 2 different pills. This is all quite confusing to me. I've been a diabetic for quite a while, but was cheating all the time before I came here. It's so hard to stick to the proper diet, but hopefully I'll catch on. You mentioned sugar-free jello - that's something I really like and I always have it on hand.

Thanks,
Rosa
 

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Rosa,

One more thing. What is your insulin to carb ratio? Meaning, how much insulin are your giving yourself?

Cheers!

Jeremy
So sorry - I have no idea what insulin to carb ratio means, nor how to determine it. I take Lantus 32 units twice daily, and Novolog 10 units for anything over 300.

Rosa
 

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So sorry - I have no idea what insulin to carb ratio means, nor how to determine it. I take Lantus 32 units twice daily, and Novolog 10 units for anything over 300.

Rosa
Now we are getting somewhere Rosa! 10 units of Novolog when your BGL is over 300 will most likely do nothing for you...it will bring you down a little bit, but not what you really need.

This is not medical advice, but I started out with this ratio and have adjusted from there. I started out with a 1:20 ratio, meaning for every 20 grams of carbs I was going to eat, I would take 1 unit of insulin. This is a pretty conservative number, really a pretty light dose. Immediately, I found that 1:20 really did nothing for me. It did not move my BGL a tick. I then started slowly lowering the ratio, 1:15, 1:10, 1:8, 1:6 and finally have ended on 1:5. So for every 5 grams of carbs, I would take 1 unit of insulin. That is for my meal time insulin to carb ratio.

I aim to keep my BGL at around 100. This prevents me from going hypo (meaning crashing blood glucose levels). So lets say I test before my meal and I am 110. My meal has 20 grams of carbs. How much insulin would I take? If I add the 10 points I am over 100 and the 20 grams of carbs, that puts me at 30 points I need to account for. Since my ratio is 1:5, I know 5 goes into 30 6 times, meaning I will need 6 units of insulin. I then take the 6 units 20 minutes before I eat. This will make the insulin hit my system at the same time as the carbs I consume in my meal (the carbs in the meal will hit faster than the insulin I give myself).

There is also a corrective dose, meaning my BGL is high, so I need to take insulin to bring it down. Really it's the same thing as the above example. If I test at 140 and my goal is 100, how many units of insulin will I need? 5 goes into 40 8 times, thus I will need 8 units of insulin to bring myself down to about 100. Many people have a lighter dose for corrective than mealtime. Mine just happens to be the same. Once you figure out what your ratio is, you will be able to manage your BGL with your meals throughout the day.

If my BGL was 300, I would need 40 units of insulin to correct it down to my goal, 100. 10 units would barely move me at all.

You mentioned that you are taking 32 units of Lantus twice a day. So am I correct in thinking that is 64 units total? While Lantus provides an excellent foundation, it alone cannot handle the flux of carbs you are throwing at it. I take 30 units, once per day (around 10pm each night). This really means nothing in terms of what you should or should not be taking, we are all different, just giving you an idea of what I do. In two weeks, I will be switching to a pump, so things will change a bit.

I think the first step for you Rosa, is to speak with your doctor about your insulin ratio. Be honest about your carb intake and figure out what you really need to bring your numbers down through your insulin.

One last note. Remember that it is always safer to end up with higher BGL than lower BGL when it comes to insulin use. What I mean is, you never want your BGL going too low because you were aggressive with your insulin. For example, if my BGL was 300, while my normal dose would call for 40 units of insulin to bring me back down to 100, I would use a bit less to prevent crashing (meaning going below 70). I might use 30 units, see where that gets me after a few hours, then take a bit more if I am still high.

This is all very high level though Rosa. I cannot stress, you should chat with your doctor or medical professional about how to figure all of this out. There are other things to consider, such as how much insulin is "on board", meaning still in your system. If you have insulin in your system and you add more thinking you need to go lower, you start doing what is commonly referred to as "stacking". That could get you in trouble as you will have more insulin in your system than you may have accounted for and can end up going hypo (shakiness, sweats, confusion, dizziness, passing out and in the worst case coma and potentially death). That is in extreme cases, but as it is a remote possibility, it should be stated.

With that said Rosa, as you figure this out and get your insulin regimen figured out, you will be able to tackle your diet and get healthier. Until you either adjust your diet to being low carb or adjust your insulin regimen to the correct dose, you will not see improvement in your numbers, mental frustrations or how you feel physically. Ideally the combo of proper insulin intake and proper diet will be your goal and we will be talking to a different Rosa in the near future :)

Cheers,

Jeremy
 
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Would it help to read "Using Insulin" by John Walsh? I think this book gives very understandable step-by-step instructions.
 
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