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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, everyone,

When I joined this summer, I mentioned that I was working on a project concerning diabetes (http://www.diabetesforum.com/introduce-yourself/2923-introduction.html). I'm ghost writing an e-book for a client who wants to help diabetics learn the things that you can't really (or don't really) get from your doctor--something I know the members here know a lot about!

I know you guys have a lot of experience and a lot of wisdom to share. Is there anything you wish someone had told you at the beginning, or something you would suggest I include in this book?

You already have so much great stuff posted on the discussion boards--do you think I could use your comments as a source for research? If not, no worries--it's your conversation and I won't use it without your permission. I will, however, be very glad to put this forum as a resource for diabetics in the ebook.

Thanks for your time and wisdom,
Strider
 

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Things my doctors never told me:

1. I was diagnosed a long time ago (1945), and doctors did not tell me that In should follow a low carb diet. I found out by reading the information in a magazine in 1988. Doctors new this information many years before I read about it. maybe my doctors assumed I already knew???

2. It is very important that diabetics who inject insulin know to rotate sites, and not continue injecting in the same general region too long. Scar tissue can develop and then absorption of the insulin is poor, or even nonexistant. I inject into my abdomen, keeping my sites about 3 cm apart. After a few weeks I switch to my upper legs while my abdomen completely heals. Switching back and forth this way keeps scar tissue from becoming a problem. My doctors never told me about scar tissue and site rotation.
 

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Eat to your meter, no one can tell you how to eat -- only you can determine your carb tolerances for yourself.

If you are "clinically diagnosed" (ie, eyeballed) as Type 2, particularly if you are diagnosed in DKA, or have any other autoimmune disease, ask for GAD antibody testing. No one can tell what your metabolism is doing, just by looking at you (even if they think they can, from their great experiences). You may have to be very insistent, to accomplish this.

For those who are Type 2, with the exception of metformin (which may even be helpful in Type 1 for lowering insulin dose), oral meds only put off the inevitable ... what??? The what being insulin, which is really quite manageable. Makes you wonder why anyone wanted to put it off. This message might just be coming from people who want your money.

Bottom line, you MUST be willing to advocate for yourself, to your medical team. And sometimes it takes a lot of assertiveness to do that. :playball: As well as a lot of good research, sometimes. :cool2: But any of us can do this, really. Just study diabetes, plan for this advocating, study, decide what you want from your doctor, and study some more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, foxl! I will definitely make sure people know those important things.

I appreciate the help!

Eat to your meter, no one can tell you how to eat -- only you can determine your carb tolerances for yourself.

If you are "clinically diagnosed" (ie, eyeballed) as Type 2, particularly if you are diagnosed in DKA, or have any other autoimmune disease, ask for GAD antibody testing. No one can tell what your metabolism is doing, just by looking at you (even if they think they can, from their great experiences). You may have to be very insistent, to accomplish this.

For those who are Type 2, with the exception of metformin (which may even be helpful in Type 1 for lowering insulin dose), oral meds only put off the inevitable ... what??? The what being insulin, which is really quite manageable. Makes you wonder why anyone wanted to put it off. This message might just be coming from people who want your money.

Bottom line, you MUST be willing to advocate for yourself, to your medical team. And sometimes it takes a lot of assertiveness to do that. :playball: As well as a lot of good research, sometimes. :cool2: But any of us can do this, really. Just study diabetes, plan for this advocating, study, decide what you want from your doctor, and study some more.
 

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I was dx'd in 2007 and never told how helpful a low carb diet is to lower bgs. For years I avoided things like bacon and eggs because I was told they were bad for me. Now they are my friends. I also was never told about Dawn Phenomenom and how it can play havoc with morning bgs. I did everything right and couldn't lower morning bgs until I joined online formums. I was also never told I should have a GAD test or a C Peptide test to test insulin levels. The most important thing I was not told was what normal bgs were. I was dx'd at 240 fasting and my doc treated it like it was no big deal. When I finally started to do my own research and found out a normal bg is around 83 I almost had a heart attack. Since I had been following my dieticians advice and keeping bgs at 180 after meals, I never realised the damage that was done to my body. I was also not told of complications when bgs are too high.
 
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