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Discussion Starter #1
The dawn phenomenon is a known real effect. I'm beginning to think that there is also a "winter" phenomenon.

Can anyone comment on whether, like me, they've noticed a change in blood sugar (a reduction) when the weather turns colder (all other things being equal).

As a new boy, the wife and I are watching the figures and the diet like hawks at the moment and we'd like to know whether this is just something we're imagining or is a real effect.

John
 

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That is not at all uncommon. I live in an area where there are 4 deffinet season changes and each one brings a change in my blood glucose levels along with an adjustment in my insulin needs.
 

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I also live in an area where there are 4 definite seasons. At first I thought I was losing my mind when my BG started changing along with an increase/decrease of insulin needs. It is comforting to know I am not the only one whose BG changes with the seasons. Calling it "Winter phenomenon" is a good thing.
 

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Thanks for the thoughts everyone. Whilst we've only got a few weeks data, it's difficult to draw firm conclusions.

Perhaps my phase 1 response has recovered a bit following six weeks of good control. Perhaps it's my imagination - reading too much into such a small data sample.

Or pehaps as Strawberry suggests it's a real phenomenon since in the middle of France, where we are, we also see real seasonal changes.

I think I'll just have to keeping monitoring the figures and see if I can get a useful pattern to emerge.

John
 

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great point.
 

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Does your activity change with the seasons? For most people I know, outdoors activities don't happen a lot in winter. My commute winter and summer is a physical activity, so that helps me stay consistent.

I don't notice a seasonal change in my insulin requirements but I don't actually test very often, so can't say for sure.
 

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Yes, it does. During the summer, we walk more and the garden needs attention. The wood we use for heating is supplied in lengths of 1 metre and needs to be cut and stacked for the following winter.

We live in a little hamlet about 2,000 feet above sea level and the winters can be a bit harsh - Record temperature since we've been here is -26C. (-15F)

During the winter, whilst we continue to walk a fair bit, when it's blowing a blizzard outside, even the dog isn't too keen to go out.

However, since I was diagnosed only in August this year I haven't got any real summer data - the blip I "noticed" was when we had a short cold snap last month. I think a lot more monitoring is needed before I can definatly justify the hypothesis of "the winter phenomenon".

thanks, John
 

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Yes, it does. During the summer, we walk more and the garden needs attention. The wood we use for heating is supplied in lengths of 1 metre and needs to be cut and stacked for the following winter.

We live in a little hamlet about 2,000 feet above sea level and the winters can be a bit harsh - Record temperature since we've been here is -26C. (-15F)

During the winter, whilst we continue to walk a fair bit, when it's blowing a blizzard outside, even the dog isn't too keen to go out.

However, since I was diagnosed only in August this year I haven't got any real summer data - the blip I "noticed" was when we had a short cold snap last month. I think a lot more monitoring is needed before I can definatly justify the hypothesis of "the winter phenomenon".

thanks, John

I'm trying to reason this out with physiology. Let's see...um...well...yeah, I got nothing. Every scenario I come up with would increase BG not make it go down (e.g. fat stores, increased blood flow to digestive tract to maintain body core temps, etc).

Will be interested to see your final report on the season, though.
 

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Every scenario I come up with would increase BG not make it go down (e.g. fat stores, increased blood flow to digestive tract to maintain body core temps, etc).
Haven't heard of Steve Windwood before but really like the sig quote.

I didn't realize John was talking about a lower bg until you mentioned it an I reread the thread. One scenario that might make it go down is the amount of energy it takes for the body to produce heat.

There was a discovery channel program with someone surviving in different situations, none of them civilized. In the extreme cold one the guy mentioned that the body can burn 5000 calories a day keeping warm.

With a drain like that on energy reserves, maybe insulin resistance drops. It does during exercise and starvation situations for example.
 

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I'm trying to reason this out with physiology. Let's see...um...well...yeah, I got nothing. Every scenario I come up with would increase BG not make it go down (e.g. fat stores, increased blood flow to digestive tract to maintain body core temps, etc).

Will be interested to see your final report on the season, though.
My basal BG (ie fasting) has gone UP UP, the past 2 Octobers!

And it is Steve Winwood ... nee of Traffic (Low Spark of High Heeled Boys) in the late 60's, and a fairly good songbook of his own in the 80's, as well.
 

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And it is Steve Winwood ... nee of Traffic (Low Spark of High Heeled Boys) in the late 60's, and a fairly good songbook of his own in the 80's, as well.
So it is. Typo!
 
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