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I don't know how chips could be cheap or filling. But anyways....we are, again, all different. Poor Kid! I hope that she succeeds in her battles with losing weight and Diabetes.
 

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Education.

Yes Terrie, This is a sad case and I just think that education in food and look at the new exciting food that's is better and get adventurous in new food. Fine we would know Terrie in what is good and know where to get it. This should be the a study in schools and get chefs to show students what's good and how to prepare food for the students to enjoy and then again to get schools to do this is another thing. :(
 

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pooor kid , she has morbid obesity ,
list of obesity-related diseases :
high blood pressure. As you put on weight, you gain mostly fatty tissue. Just like other parts of the body, this tissue relies on oxygen and nutrients in your blood to survive. As demand for oxygen and nutrients increases, the amount of blood circulating through your body also increases. More blood traveling through your arteries means added pressure on your artery walls. Weight gain also typically increases the level of insulin, a blood sugar controlling hormone, in your blood. The increase in insulin is associated with retention of sodium and water, which increases blood volume. In addition, excess weight often is associated with an increase in your heart rate and a reduction in the capacity of your blood vessels to transport blood. All of these factors can increase blood pressure.
Diabetes. Obesity is a leading cause of type 2 diabetes. Excess fat makes your body resistant to insulin, the hormone that helps your body maintain a proper level of a sugar (glucose) in your blood. If your body is resistant to insulin, your blood sugar can be high — which isn't good — and leads to negative health effects.
Abnormal blood fats. A diet high in saturated fats — red meat and fried foods, for example — can lead to obesity as well as elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein ("bad") cholesterol. Obesity is also associated with low levels of high-density lipoprotein ("good") cholesterol and high levels of triglycerides. Triglycerides are the form in which most fat exists in food as well as in your body. Over time, abnormal blood fats can contribute to atherosclerosis — the buildup of fatty deposits in arteries throughout your body. Atherosclerosis puts you at risk of coronary artery disease and stroke.
Coronary artery disease. This is a form of cardiovascular disease. It results from the buildup of fatty deposits in arteries that supply your heart. Over time these deposits can narrow your heart's arteries, so less blood flows to your heart. Diminished blood flow to your heart can cause chest pain (angina). Complete blockage can lead to a heart attack.
Stroke. Obesity is associated with atherosclerosis — the buildup of fatty deposits in arteries throughout your body, including arteries in your brain. If a blood clot forms in a narrowed artery in your brain, it can block blood flow to an area of your brain. The result is a stroke. Being obese raises your risk of a stroke.
Osteoarthritis. This joint disorder most often affects the knees, hips and lower back. Excess weight puts extra pressure on these joints and wears away the cartilage that protects them, resulting in joint pain and stiffness.
Sleep apnea. This serious condition causes a person to stop breathing for short periods during sleep and to snore heavily. The upper airway is blocked during sleep, which results in frequent awakening at night and subsequent drowsiness during the day. Most people with sleep apnea are overweight, which contributes to a large neck and narrowed airways.
Cancer. Many types of cancer are associated with being overweight. These include cancers of the colon, rectum, esophagus, kidney, breast and prostate.
Fatty liver disease. When you're obese, fats can build up in your liver. This fatty accumulation can lead to inflammation and scarring of the liver. Such scarring can cause cirrhosis of the liver, even if you're not a heavy alcohol drinker.
Gallbladder disease. Because overweight people may produce more cholesterol, which can be deposited in the gallbladder, the risk of gallstones is higher in obese people. Fast weight loss — more than 3 pounds a week — also can increase the risk of gallstones.
Fertility and pregnancy problems. Increased body mass may be associated with fertility problems for both men and women. Obesity may lead to gestational diabetes and other problems during pregnancy and may increase the risk of birth defects.
Physical discomfort. As fat accumulates, it crowds the space occupied by your organs. Some obese people can't sit comfortably because of fat in their abdomen. In a seated position, an obese person may have limited ability to breathe. Pain in the back, feet, joints and muscles also may occur.
Social and emotional consequences. Overweight or obese individuals may experience psychological stress, reduced income and discrimination.

(from mayoclinic.com)
 
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