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Discussion Starter #1
I'm 21 years old in university and am frustrated with having to provide medical notes to profs who do not understand my condition.

Ive tried googling for answers to alleviate this problem but have found nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well besides struggling to stablize my morning bloodsugars, I am trying to stablize my thyroid. I'm not sure it the comatose knocked out feeling is due to hypothyroid, type 1 diabetes, or lifestyle (poor eating/lack of sleep). Sometimes i skip breakfast due to lack of appetite, or because i need to wait 30 mins to eat after taking my synthroid pill for hypothyroid. If i do make it to class, i have unbearable heartburn which sometimes leads to vomiting.

Recently (and repeatedly) i had assignments finished before the due date but handed them in late. When due date comes around, 1-5 times a semester in my university career, i may be unable to make it due to my condition.

I am struggling to keep my marks up. And have so much trouble trying to explain in words to all my profs. Some are very understanding while I feel others hate me for it.
 

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I went through graduate school while undergoing cancer treatment for stage II cancer. You know what your class schedule is, so you need to plan and adjust accordingly. If you have early morning classes, you should be planning on waking up early enough to take your blood sugar and do what needs to be done with whatever medical issues are going on.

In the cases of missed assignments or late work, you should speak with the dean at your college, if you feel that there are professors not willing to accommodate your medical needs. Also, take advantage of the free tutors on college campuses if your grades are slipping.

As far as trying to explain the situation, speak with your campus's medical center. The nurse on staff can help with any medical explanations that are necessary when dealing with professors that are not knowledgeable in regards to diabetes.

Best of luck to you in your studies and in your diabetes management.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My attendance is pretty good. Apparently stress can cause spikes in bloodsugar. Perhaps this is my correlation with these symptoms on due dates?

Also, it is not safe to drive across town to class with high/low sugars only to meet the due date. I need to stay home and treat my condition.

The following day when i'm feeling better and try to hand it assignments, some profs will not accept without a medical note (which costs a trip to a doctor and $10) and some will not listen or be understanding.

After so many notes it is really getting frustrating, especially when i am unable to make it to the doctor office for the $10 note.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you so much for your kind note -
Congrats on going through graduate school despite your adversity. I am going to go to the campus's medical clinic again tomorrow and try to explain this complex issue: that i am needing too many doctors notes for something i will be struggling with for life. Its not like the flu or temporary illness. Ughh.
 

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Good luck -

In the meantime, you may want to stick around and read some of the threads. They could help you maintain better control of your blood sugar, which would also help with the school issues. I know time's pressed when you're in college and juggling studies, but you may learn some very useful diabetes management techniques that will help you achieve better control. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Very true. My cooking skills are pathetic, I am trying to figure out type 1 diabetes (diagnosed only 5 yrs ago & insulin doses are still changing), and trying to stabalize hypothyroidism.

I am an optimistic person and sometimes tell myself that everything is okay. I would rather pretend that my condition is not affecting me so immensely then have to explain to every prof and employer that my condition does affect me so much..
 

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How long have you had diabetes and what are your management methods? I would think control of your diabetes would be of paramount importance, and once that is settled, other obligations would be easier. Are on on a pump or MDI? What was your last A1c and what are your postprandial numbers like?
 

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I do understand and many others here also understand. Even with poor cooking skills, I'd bet you can whip up a little something tasty for each meal. Do you keep your carbs down, so that you require less insulin?
 

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Oops, now I see we were typing at the same time, and you've also updated your user profile. So you've been diabetic for five years . . . what management methods do you use and what are your numbers?
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
1 unit of fast acting takes my blood glucose down 2. (ex.: from 8.5 to 6.5)
1 unit of fast acting insulin counteracts 10g of carbs.

So if my bloodsugar is at 11.0 and i was about to consume 70 carbs, i would take 4+7=11 units of insulin. This is what I was told when initially diagnosed, and have had no further education since. Over the years my insulin dosage changed, and now i have adjusted to add in addition to the 11 units in previous example, 15 units of insuling today. (11 units of insulin to adjust what would have helped 5 years ago, plus 15 units to adjust for my changing insulin dosage since i was diagnosed. So 11+15=26 units of fast acting for a 70 carb meal with a glucose of 11)

At 10pm I take long acting insulin in attempt to help my high morning readings.

Both my fast & long acting insulin is injected with an insulin pen.
 

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That is a lot of carbs, I'm a type 2 and up until last summer I ate loads of pasta,potatoes and rice. Easily 70 to 100 carbs for lunch and dinner. Trying to knock all those carbs down with insulin was hopeless.

When I changed to the low carb high fat life, things became easy. Eat small amounts of carbs ,take small amounts of insulin. I like easy...
Eating high carb meals will keep your sugar high. The more you eat ,the more you want. Most members here eat very little carbs, I try and stay around 30 per day total.
 

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Here's some info on low-carb, high-fat.

We have lots of recipes in our Recipes subforum, including easy stuff (I'm not much of a cook, either). Lots of recipes are now coming out online, too -- look for "low-carb," "LCHF," and maybe "paleo" or "primal." (The last two aren't always low-carb.)

Weirdly enough, you'll probably want to avoid recipes and foods labeled "diabetic" or "diabetic-friendly." They're usually loaded with carbs!
 

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Hey Student,
It feels refreshing to see blood sugar readings that I understand.
No offence to our international members here on the site.
I don't think you will find much compassion with doctor's notes etc....
People generally don't know what we go through mood/energy wise and never will unless they encounter the disease themselves.
It is human nature and I don't take offense to it.
Having said that....many people worst off dig down deep and emerge being champions and leaders of their desires.
Try to be that and embrace it.
Good luck with it all.
Craig, your fellow Canuck
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Craig, thank you for your encouragement.

It is also refreshing to receive advice from a Type 1 Diabetic, as Type 2 & Type 1 are entirely different in both their dis-ease and management.

While advice from Type 2s demonstrates a thorough understanding of Type 2, no offence to Type 2s, but much of the advice you provide demonstrates a lack of understanding of Type 1.

Thank you all for the Diabetes support - even though all types are different, and each case is unique, it is nice to have others who can empathize with each other.
 

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Hi Student. I am a T1 and have been for 43 years. Please do not discredit the advice from the T2's on this forum. They all may not know the exact trials of dealing with insulin dependent diabetes but I can tell you I have learned more from all the people on this forum, including advice from T2s than I have ever learned from any endocrinologist. Everyone here is well educated on diabetic diets and how to control blood sugars much better than advice you will get from the medical community. After the advice from the people on this forum, I am now able to keep my sugars between 70-110 (3.7-5.8) almost all of the time. Please ask any questions you may have. I do agree that eating 70g of carbs in a meal will make it very difficult to control your BG. I aim for approximately 10g of carbs per meal, sometimes even lower. I think tonight I had 6g carbs for dinner.

Sent from Tony's iPhone
 

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Some of us Type 2s are on insulin.

Now, most of us do not bolus for protein, and we may be able to avoid bolus insulin altogether (though it's good to have around as a precaution). Our insulin resistance, however, may force us to take larger doses of basal than many Type 1s.

Type 1s can experience insulin resistance as well, and be prescribed Metformin (a "Type 2 drug") to reduce it.

Those are the only differences in insulin treatment that I know of ... and I wouldn't be surprised if a protein-bolusing Type 2 popped in to correct me.

Effective eating plans for all Types are based on the same basic principles, and we all have the same goal -- to manage BGLs. Plan details, however, vary from one individual to the next.
 
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