The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trigger Finger

Trigger finger and thumb are painful conditions that cause the fingers or thumb to catch or lock in a bent position. The problems often stem from inflammation of tendons located within a protective covering called the tendon sheath.

The affected tendons are tough, fibrous bands of tissue that connect the muscles of the forearm to your finger and thumb bones. Together, the tendons and muscles allow you to bend and extend your fingers and thumb, for example, as in making a fist.

A tendon usually glides quite easily through the tissue that covers it (also called a sheath) because of a lubricating membrane surrounding the joint called the synovium. Occasionally a tendon may become inflamed and swollen. When this happens, bending the finger or thumb may pull the inflamed portion through a narrowed tendon sheath, making it snap or pop.

What Causes Trigger Finger?

Trigger finger may be caused by highly repetitive or forceful use of the finger and thumb. Medical conditions that cause changes in tissues -- such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout or diabetes -- also may result in trigger finger. Prolonged, strenuous grasping, such as with power tools, also may aggravate the condition.

Who Gets Trigger Finger?

Farmers, industrial workers and musicians are frequently affected by trigger finger since they rely on their fingers or thumbs for multiple repetitive movements. Trigger finger is more common in women than in men and tends to occur most frequently in people who are between 40 and 60 years of age.

What Are the Symptoms of Trigger Finger?

One of the first symptoms may be soreness at the base of the finger or thumb. The most common symptom is a painful clicking or snapping when attempting to flex or extend the affected finger. This catching sensation tends to worsen after periods of inactivity and loosen up with movement.

In some cases, the finger or thumb that is affected locks in a flexed position or in an extended position as the condition becomes more severe, and must be gently straightened with the other hand. Joint contraction or stiffening may eventually occur.

How Is Trigger Finger Diagnosed?

No X-rays or lab tests are used to diagnose trigger finger. It is generally diagnosed following a physical examination of the hand and fingers. In some cases, the affected finger may be swollen and there may be a nodule, or bump, over the joint in the palm of the hand. The finger also may be locked in a flexed (bent) position, or it may be stiff and painful.

How Is Trigger Finger Treated?

The first step to recovery is to limit activities that aggravate the condition. Occasionally, your doctor may put a splint on the affected hand to restrict the joint movement. If symptoms continue, anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, may be prescribed. Your doctor may also recommend an injection of a steroid medication into the tendon sheath. If the condition does not respond to conservative measures or consistently recurs, surgery may be recommended to release the tendon sheath and restore movement.

How Long Does Recovery Take?


Recovery time depends on the severity of trigger finger, which varies from person to person. The choice of treatment also impacts recovery time. For example, splinting may be necessary for six weeks. However, most patients with trigger finger recover within a few weeks by resting and limiting the use of the affected finger and/or using anti-inflammatory medications.


Thankfully, this is one condition I don't have(kow)but many Diabetics I've spoken to, do. A Good many of them have had to have the surgery to release the tendons since the other treatments didn't work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Just saw the post Terrie.Great explanation .I had a trigger finger in my right hand ,the ring finger last year and has you explain it is painfull .The specialist, when i saw him suggested i get operated right away because i was a diabetic and it would reoccur.Got the op.and everything is ok.Now i have another one same hand the middle finger .I have a R.V in december see how it goes Bye Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Richard!! ;) I'm Glad that you were able to have the procedure done on your ring finger. Many Diabetics as you know have that condition and have to get it repaired also. Great luck to you in December on your other finger. Hopefully it won't be done right near Chritmas time. Let us know how it goes then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Tissue Damage and Diabetes

Terrie -- good post, not too many of us are aware that diabetes can bring these complications. So far, no finger problem with me, but plantar fasciitus and Peyronie's disease are related. When I asked my urologist what other tissues can be affected by diabetes, he mentioned the hands and fingers. The usual response is that complications come from having high blood sugar levels, but when I explained to the doc that my A1C levels have been in the top 30 percent, he said that some researchers believe these can be caused by immune disorders similar to the onset of type 1 where your body turns against itself.:eek:

reido
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi There Reido: :)

Well, it is a fact and makes sense that Diabetes can damage any part of the human body....scary as it is. I don't think that we would have enough room on this Forum to name every possible specif damage that could occur from Diabetes. Thankfully at the same time most of us do not see more than 12 problems each....which is still too many. But true also that our immune systems, as you say can cause havoc. And as Richard157 said, some of the conditions that occured with him may have happened anyways just by the aging process since they all can happen to non-Diabetics.

I'm Glad to hear that you don't have Trigger Finger but that Plantar Fasciitus some painful too.

As you know, Peyronie's disease has several causes such as inherited traits, injury/trauma, some types of Beta Blockers( although rare), aging, etc. Yes, researchers are suggesting that Peyronie's could be an autoimmune disease in itself which is interesting. As we know, if a Person has one autoimmune disease, others usually affect that same Person.

Hopefully, your Drs. have suggested Good treatments that will relieve your symptoms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,024 Posts
Hi Terrie, long time no talk! Lol! I have trigger finger in both thumbs for several years. It occurs only when my blood sugar drops quite low and not always even then. I have to pull my thumbs away from my palm to get them back in a normal position. It does not last very long and when my blood sugar begins rising the problem is gone.

~Richard
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Twelve Problems each? Obviously you have read some research...Can you recall the article/text where this originated?

I may be short a few...and sure don't want to be cheated!

reido
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top