The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My daughter got a palatal expander on Monday. You can already see her 2 front teeth spreading apart! It has a spring pulling the suture on the roof of her mouth open ... to make room for her adult teeth, without extractions. OUCH. Apparently this technique is used a lot, now, in orthodontics.

Anyhow, it is hard for her to EAT, she already was a picky little thing, basically had four foods. Three of those are now hard-to-impossible. Pizza crust (refrigerated leftover pizza) is too hard. Chicken nuggets are too hard. She alleges that green veg are, too, but it is an excuse.:rolleyes: Breads ... nope.

So we stocked up as best we could on things she might eat, because in the past she has had trouble with losing weight and getting sick. This is only for over the winter, and we are not too worried about WHAT she eats as long as it gives her kcal.

So: Peanut butter, bananas, cheese slices, whole milk (we already were working toward it), a ton of green veg, canned fruits, scrambled eggs with ketchup (only way she'd eat them) ... anybody got other ideas? Poor kid's speech is pretty compromised, this thing is fixed to the roof of her mouth until February, when she gets it off, and braces installed in the same appt. We took her to McD's last night (A REAL RARITY, maybe the first time!), her ortho had sent her a coupon for soft serve ice cream -- and she declares that HATES ICE CREAM? :eek::eek::eek: Good grief. It will be an uphill battle.

So ironic, giving her whole-fat milk and all, to keep HER weight up, while I eat HF to keep mine down ... but, she is getting carbs along with it -- as healthy as we can manage to get into her, I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,795 Posts
Some years back my son had to have his jaw broken for the same reason and I made him 'smoothies' with eggs, milk and all sorts of flavors....bananas, vanilla, etc. Do you suppose she would like those? His jaw was wired and he had to drink from a straw. He was 15 and needed lots of calories.

Blessings, in any case,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
My son was very late to lose his baby teeth. He had the problem with the row of permanent teeth coming up behind the baby teeth. He even had one tooth that was coming up straight took a turn and came in sideways under his nose. So the poor guy had to have braces twice. Once in 5 th grade and then again when he was a senior in HS. So he wore braces well into college. Luckily all the dental surgery and wires worked and his teeth are fine now. I would suggest lots of smoothies, things like puddings, applesauce. You can puree almost any kind of veggie and meat combo. I make lots of veggie soups and use an immersion blender at the end to smoothe out all the chunks. I guess you could make a tomato based soup and add pizza spices to it. It is not quite the same but you could call it pizza soup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Raw eggs would probably get THROWN at me! WE finally have her eating scrambled, with a ton of ketchup. If they get cold, she gags. And she hates puddings. I did not even buy Pediasure this time around -- we tried it on her once.

This is a kid who had to be force-fed her bottles as a baby (preemie) and with autism, you get terrible food sensitivities.

I have her using a water pik to clean her appliance, she has incredible gag reflex, too. Also have her using 1:8 dilution of mouthwash (mint gags her, let alone the alcohol).

It's funny she will eat anything as strongly-flavored as pizza ... she discriminates between 2% and 1% milk! We had to sneak it up on her. But it has to be the right brand of pizza, too.

She will eat chocolate, but it must taste exactly like the kind she got when the nice teacher gave it to her, at a party she had fun at, and so was very relaxed ... :rolleyes: At least that was Hershey's, easy to come by. But yeh, she's like THAT!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,162 Posts
Your daughter has my sympathies. I had a bad crossbite, and 10 years ago a surgery to correct it where they broke my palate and installed one of those evil things, before going into braces and having my teeth rearranged. I turned the screw until there was enough space for a tooth right in the front of my mouth - I reckoned was space for a corncob pipe or something, which I explained in my best Southern accent. You know in some African cultures/tribes they knock out a tooth so if they get lockjaw they can still push a bit of food in? I was an honorary member.

Anyway - I recall wanting to tie the appliance to the back of a truck w/ a rope and have it take off and yank the thing out. I =hated= it ... the lisp, the food getting caught between it and my palate, and mostly not having enough tongue room. Most kids are more adaptive and adult than I was.

During that time I drank a lot of canned Kern's fruit juice (delicious but ack!), carrot juice, green veggie juice - and cut things up really really well. I made lots of souffles.

The day I got that beast out was perhaps the happiest day of my life!

Did I say my sympathies?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
And this misery is alleged to be an improvement over having to pull a tooth or two to make room? I'm having trouble imagining it, but then I've never worn braces or had a tooth pulled - ever. Poor little thing - if she'll accept hugs - here's one from me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
My middle son the one with the braces was such a picky eater and still is as an adult. I feel sorry for his wife. He grew up on plain rice and plain pasta or cold cereal. He took a peanut butter sandwich, no jelly on white bread with the crusts cut off every day of his school life until he was a senior in HS. Will she eat yogurt, maybe you could make frozen yogurt pops. Can you sneak whey powder into anything she eats. When my daughter had all of her wisdom teeth out this summer I made her some roasted sweet potatoes and then I pureed them with a little broth and added butter. She loved them. Will she eat stuff like cream of wheat. All my kids loved it with lots of cinnamon and of course brown sugar. You could stir extra whey powder in it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: foxl

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
And this misery is alleged to be an improvement over having to pull a tooth or two to make room? I'm having trouble imagining it, but then I've never worn braces or had a tooth pulled - ever. Poor little thing - if she'll accept hugs - here's one from me.
I really DO think it is an advantage over pulling teeth -- b/c after all, you never know when you might need them, and once they are gone, they are gone! She is doing great -- her Dad seems to have programmed activities to keep her occupied and her mind off her mouth. She just always has been so frustrating about FOOD, and some of her 4 faves are too chewy. It takes a week or so I am told, and things normalize a lot!

It's all a consequence of a tiny, girlish face, and prolonged thumbsucking -- she went through so much in infancy, we were advised to let it go, and we did. She is also very pretty, but her 2 fronts stick out past her lips. She got teased about having an ugly smile.

She is the huggiest child, EVER, Shanny, and I will give her one for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
That makes sense since she's so young - my sis was in her teens when she got braces & think they pulled two teeth from both upper & lower jaw.

I have exactly the opposite thing - much space between my four upper incisors. When my wisdom teeth began coming in, I so hoped they'd push everything together & close those spaces, but not to be. There was plenty of room for all four wisdom teeth too - they bucked a little for a year or so, but then slid down nicely right into place.

A dingbat dentist told me once that he didn't bother filling wisdom teeth - if they decayed he just pulled them. I said "we'll see", and as you might have guessed (knowing me) - he eventually filled one. I also had two different dentists tell me I needed orthodontics, so I finally made an appointment. Felt a little sorry for the guy, having to rummage around trying to find trays big enough to reach all my teeth for the cast, but he finally got it done and determined what I already knew - I didn't and don't need orthodontics. There's nothing wrong with my bite. And if those nitwit dentists had troubled to ask me, I'd have saved everybody the trouble by telling them if I wanted cosmetic orthodontia, I'd have done it long before I got to middle age!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yep -- it is the orthodontic fashion of the day to do it younger, and do the palatal expansion -- even at 7! As soon as enough adult teeth are in.

The kids are in braces only 1 - 2 years (vs. 5 yrs, in the 70's), and then in retainers, for life. Well that part will be interesting. But it is better to have them on more briefly, too -- less potential for cavities!

Our youngest, 7, has a cleft of the lip (repaired in China) and gumline, she is on watchful waiting, but we expect to start her treatment within a year, too. I assume the same procedure but do not know for sure yet. We have not been let in on either treatment plan -- just the pricing, LOL. Her teeth actually look more crowded, on Xrays. This orthodontist is faculty at our dental school and works on the cleft team of our children's hospital, too.

My son is off the hook -- for now!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
158 Posts
My daughter got a palatal expander on Monday. You can already see her 2 front teeth spreading apart! It has a spring pulling the suture on the roof of her mouth open ... to make room for her adult teeth, without extractions. OUCH. Apparently this technique is used a lot, now, in orthodontics.

Anyhow, it is hard for her to EAT, she already was a picky little thing, basically had four foods. Three of those are now hard-to-impossible. Pizza crust (refrigerated leftover pizza) is too hard. Chicken nuggets are too hard. She alleges that green veg are, too, but it is an excuse.:rolleyes: Breads ... nope.

So we stocked up as best we could on things she might eat, because in the past she has had trouble with losing weight and getting sick. This is only for over the winter, and we are not too worried about WHAT she eats as long as it gives her kcal.

So: Peanut butter, bananas, cheese slices, whole milk (we already were working toward it), a ton of green veg, canned fruits, scrambled eggs with ketchup (only way she'd eat them) ... anybody got other ideas? Poor kid's speech is pretty compromised, this thing is fixed to the roof of her mouth until February, when she gets it off, and braces installed in the same appt. We took her to McD's last night (A REAL RARITY, maybe the first time!), her ortho had sent her a coupon for soft serve ice cream -- and she declares that HATES ICE CREAM? :eek::eek::eek: Good grief. It will be an uphill battle.

So ironic, giving her whole-fat milk and all, to keep HER weight up, while I eat HF to keep mine down ... but, she is getting carbs along with it -- as healthy as we can manage to get into her, I guess.
It sounds like your daughter is responding more to the TEXTURE of the food. She doesn't seem to like the smooth, slick textures. I would focus on finding food items that had a strong flavor and/or slightly rough texture. How about cereals, such as Chex? These are crunchy without being too hard. Or buy her those cute miniature variety boxes of cereals and let her experiment to find the ones she likes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Daytona

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,665 Posts
It sounds like your daughter is responding more to the TEXTURE of the food. She doesn't seem to like the smooth, slick textures. I would focus on finding food items that had a strong flavor and/or slightly rough texture. How about cereals, such as Chex? These are crunchy without being too hard. Or buy her those cute miniature variety boxes of cereals and let her experiment to find the ones she likes.
I agree with MsTCB on the texture issue. I used to be extremely picky as a child for the same reason. If the texture was off, I would gag (or puke). After years of forcing myself to eat more adventurously (the social pressure to not be weird is much stronger than wanting to please your parents!), I'm now not quite so wimpy though some foods still make me gag.

My mom had luck mixing foods together to get the texture right. For instance, I wouldn't eat applesauce by itself but would eat it with cottage cheese mixed in. I wouldn't eat some foods whole (like mushrooms) but could tolerate them if they were chopped up and mixed in or if they were pureed into the sauce. Even with those tricks, I mostly ate like 5 different foods for a few years.

Good luck with the palate expander. I went through something similar and boy did it hurt!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, sometimes texture is an issue with autistic kids, some textures bother her, but also some flavors do, too.

Her father for some horrible unthinking reason :target::target::target: put black pepper in her cheese omelet last night, though, and it was a lengthy battle to gag that down. But she did, with the promise of a reward and no more pepper!

She does eat cheerios and mini-wheats, and as far as slick or slimy, loves canned fruit, and peach yogurt (only the peach :rolleyes: ) so it is hit or miss, more often, miss, with her ...

This morning at my (lengthy and constant) urging, breakfast is a yogurt, AND cheerios, with milk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Do you think she would eat Greek yogurt? I know it has a thicker texture that may help. I was going to suggest that and jello but not sure if she will eat jello.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
158 Posts
Well, sometimes texture is an issue with autistic kids, some textures bother her, but also some flavors do, too.

Her father for some horrible unthinking reason :target::target::target: put black pepper in her cheese omelet last night, though, and it was a lengthy battle to gag that down. But she did, with the promise of a reward and no more pepper!

She does eat cheerios and mini-wheats, and as far as slick or slimy, loves canned fruit, and peach yogurt (only the peach :rolleyes: ) so it is hit or miss, more often, miss, with her ...

This morning at my (lengthy and constant) urging, breakfast is a yogurt, AND cheerios, with milk.
Wow - why didn't you just make another omelet without the black pepper? You would have saved her the TRAUMA and yourself the trouble of forcing her to eat something she obviously didn't like.

Don't mean to sound harsh, but I, too, have raised an child with autism who is now 22 years old, and I hold a masters degree in Special Education. So, I do have experience with these issues.

It IS the texture issue. Note your daughter is not being "hit or miss" but rather she is being consistent. The cereals that I recommended and that she is eating with no problem have a rough texture. The peach yogurt has a rougher texture due to the peaches than any other fruit yogurt. So, no surprise there. Canned fruit is NOT slimy - it is rough. So, your daughter is being very consistent.

So, I would SKIP the slim and stick with the rough stuff. As long as she is taking a multi-vitamin, let her eat what she likes even if it is just 4 or 5 things.

Hope this helps. :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
158 Posts
Do you think she would eat Greek yogurt? I know it has a thicker texture that may help. I was going to suggest that and jello but not sure if she will eat jello.
She needs to eat things that involve CHEWING action. She obviously does not like the food items that just go down the throat without needing to be CHEWED. She is being VERY consistent.

Sorry, but it just breaks my heart to hear that a child is being FORCED to eat things that she is GAGGING on. VERY SAD :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sorry MsTCB but I was here, and you were not, and I disagree.
Did you even read my initial post? The kid is having temporary chewing and swallowing problems, due to her new orthodontic appliance!

She did eat the omelet, and next time, her dad will not add pepper. She is 10 yrs old, and this is hardly torture or abuse.

And while I no longer eat fruit, the last time I checked, peaches were definitely slimy!

She is who she is, her likes and dislikes can be quite specific and sometimes also surprising. I have read several books on how to feed her! We generally work with her on food choices. But when she asks for something, and then rejects it (and she has managed pepper before!) she needs to eat it. She did fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,795 Posts
I know our pediatrician had a daughter who lived on nothing but cereal for her first 5 years and he just let her do it as long as she took her multi-vitamin in front of him every night. She's a very happy, healthy lawyer now and just laughs about her food fetish now!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
158 Posts
Sorry MsTCB but I was here, and you were not, and I disagree.
Did you even read my initial post? The kid is having temporary chewing and swallowing problems, due to her new orthodontic appliance!

She did eat the omelet, and next time, her dad will not add pepper. She is 10 yrs old, and this is hardly torture or abuse.

And while I no longer eat fruit, the last time I checked, peaches were definitely slimy!

She is who she is, her likes and dislikes can be quite specific and sometimes also surprising. I have read several books on how to feed her! We generally work with her on food choices. But when she asks for something, and then rejects it (and she has managed pepper before!) she needs to eat it. She did fine.
Yes, indeed, I did read your OP. Notice that the food items I recommended are not hard to chew or swallow. You would be surprised at how food starts to rapidly dissolve in your mouth with little actual chewing involved.

Haven't you ever asked for or prepared something and then tasted it and realized you didn't like/want it? Same thing is happening for her.

I still eat peaches and no, they are not slimy - especially not the chunks that are in peach yogurt or in canned fruit cups. You have to chew them, but they are a soft chew.

When you posted, I assumed you were looking for suggestions, so that's why I made those recommendations based upon 22+ years of personal experience dealing with a MULTITUDE of children with autism. Did not intend to offend - only help. :)
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top