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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
BTW, I do not have diabetes, nor have ever been considered pre-diabetic, and am in good sport form, etc. However, in the past, my glucose tests (done in a blood draw, as part of my regular yearly blood tests) have tended to be in the upper range of good, so diabetes is a bit of concern. Other than that, I have had no symptoms of diabetes.

For this latest test, I have one entry under the general heading "Complete Metabolic Profile" that says:

Name - Test Value - Reference Range - Units

Glucose - 90 - 65-99 - mg/dl

For the last few years, this value has been 99-102 - i.e., borderline problem - so it would appear that this is very good news.

However, I have these other test entries:

Hemoglobin A1C - 5.3 - 4.7-5.6 - %

Est Avg Glucose Calc - 105 - <115 - mg/dl

So what is this new glucose test all about? For both tests, I am about 10% below the upper limit, so it would seem that they are in concordance.
 

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I'm not sure what exactly what you are asking, but from those values I'd say you are wise to keep an eye on it. You are lucky that you are asking about it. It may be a great thing that you know this now and perhaps you can watch your carb count and perhaps avoid a problem now and forever. I'd advise loosing any extra weight you may carry and try to give up, or limit breads, rice, and other forms of sugar you eat.

Good luck, wish I'd caught mine that early!
 

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Hi there.

That new test, called the HbA1c gives you an idea of your average blood sugar during the last ~120 days.
Your results basically mean that you seem to have normal blood glucose. However, they're just a little high for a non-diabetic.

I would suggest an OGTT, or oral glucose tolerance test.
They take your fasting blood glucose and then you get to drink a certain amount of juice/water with sugar (I think it's about 75g of carbs...correct me if I am wrong. I had a yummy grape juice made specifically for the test from the pharmacy)

2 hours later they test your blood sugar again.
This would definitely help you get rid of the uncertainty.

How old are you?
Do you have ANY symptoms at all? I mean not just diabetes symptoms but anything really.

Btw you do not need to be overweight to get diabetes.
You have to get this checked out since you could also be type 1 diabetic (and there is no diet in the world to help you with that)

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am a 46 white male. I don't think I have any symptoms at all (or at least symptoms that are not explained by other reasons, such as frequent urination due to prostate problems, etc.)

I am definitely a carnivore and have a big meat meal every day, usually accompanied by potatoes and beer. I do tend to eat a standard sugary breakfast, however, and usually have a sugary drink or snack around bedtime. I am a very regular exerciser, going for a 40 minute walk almost every day (in not more, e.g., when going for a day of skiing or sightseeing.)
 

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Before diabetes I was a healthy vegetarian who worked out 2-3 hours a day. I was not really overweight for the 5 or 6 years before diabetes. But I did have extra weight with 6 pregnancies that took 10 years to take off. By the time I was dx's at 56, I was in terrific shape, and no family history. So don't assume you are not at risk. I also have an HbA1c of 5.3, now but it went up to almost 11, 5 years ago. This was all while eating vegetarian and eating whole grains. When you are prone to diabetes you don't handle and process carbs well. If you are worried go to Walmart and buy a Relion meter and test 2 hours after you eat a high carb meal. A non diabetic will be close to 100 after they eat, but diabetics will be quite high. Usually your fasting number is the last one to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
But, jwags, I thought that the reason folks got Type II is that they kept on gorging on sweets and not exercising, so their body just gave up trying to handle sugars - at least this is the way that Type II is portrayed - i.e., that folks get Type II because they are lazy and gluttonous, etc. It sounds like you are saying that Type II is really an inherent disease in that it is just a condition in which folks can't handle carbohydrates as well as others (i.e., folks who don't have diabetes), which happens to some folks as they reach a certain age - and in no way, shape or form correlates to the fact that the person may have spent his life eating a poor diet or not exercising. IOW, it's like baldness in men - you're either going to get it, or not get it.

But it seems that some folks can self-treat their Type II by losing weight, eating healthier and exercising. I suppose that these folks just have a less severe form, and can revert back to the a pre-civilization lifestyle to cure themselves. That seems to logically feedback into my initial contention about what causes Type II.
 

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But, jwags, I thought that the reason folks got Type II is that they kept on gorging on sweets and not exercising, so their body just gave up trying to handle sugars - at least this is the way that Type II is portrayed - i.e., that folks get Type II because they are lazy and gluttonous, etc. It sounds like you are saying that Type II is really an inherent disease in that it is just a condition in which folks can't handle carbohydrates as well as others (i.e., folks who don't have diabetes), which happens to some folks as they reach a certain age - and in no way, shape or form correlates to the fact that the person may have spent his life eating a poor diet or not exercising. IOW, it's like baldness in men - you're either going to get it, or not get it.

But it seems that some folks can self-treat their Type II by losing weight, eating healthier and exercising. I suppose that these folks just have a less severe form, and can revert back to the a pre-civilization lifestyle to cure themselves. That seems to logically feedback into my initial contention about what causes Type II.
It IS the prevailing general thouht that 1) people get fat because they eat too much and are lazy, and 2) people get diabetes T2 because they eat too much sugar and are lazy.

Genetics play a huge role in the development of diabetes. One is predisposed - but that doesn't mean one most certainly WILL develop diabetes. The human body is complex.

Re: 1
What is actually happening is that there is excess glucose in the blood because of high carbohydrate consumption. This causes increased insulin production and eventually insulin resistance - which causes a lot of insulin to be floating around in the blood. Insulin is very efficient in grabbing the excess glucose and storing it as fat. To the detrement of the cells that need it for energy (compounded by the fact that they are insulin resistant). The result is that, while the body puts on fat, the cells are "starving" - making one very hungry and sluggish. THEN, the person eats more because the ARE hungry.

Re: 2
There are many overwheight people who are IR who's pancreas is able to keep up with the high carbohydrates and keep the BG within normal range. The ones who evelope T2 diabetes are the ones whose beta cells in the pancreas do not keep up, and don't renew at a rate that is needed. This is the genetic factor.

Many have found that they can bypass the need to produce lot of insulin by not eating those foods that need insulin to be metabolized (carbohydrates). That's why the low-carb/high fat diet works so well. IF there is still some insulin produced by the pancreas, and if what is produced is sufficient for the need, then the person's BG can reach normal levels. (Now, this is a big IF, and it may be that meds and even insulin would be needed.)

When one is just beginning to see higher BG levels than normal, and if one lowers carbohydrate consumption, it is possible to keep BG within the normal range and never really develop full-blown diabetes. But, then again, this has a lot to do with genetics.

-----

I want to add that when carbs are reduced and no longer raise BG, the body will switch over to using fat as fuel (known as being in ketosis). When this happens, fat is no longer locked into fat cells by insulin and is broken down and used as fuel. Hence, the easy weight loss. And, most people who start a low-carb diet report that they have more energy then they can remember. Well, of course, they are no longer starving.
 

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But, jwags, I thought that the reason folks got Type II is that they kept on gorging on sweets and not exercising, so their body just gave up trying to handle sugars - at least this is the way that Type II is portrayed - i.e., that folks get Type II because they are lazy and gluttonous, etc. It sounds like you are saying that Type II is really an inherent disease in that it is just a condition in which folks can't handle carbohydrates as well as others (i.e., folks who don't have diabetes), which happens to some folks as they reach a certain age - and in no way, shape or form correlates to the fact that the person may have spent his life eating a poor diet or not exercising. IOW, it's like baldness in men - you're either going to get it, or not get it.

But it seems that some folks can self-treat their Type II by losing weight, eating healthier and exercising. I suppose that these folks just have a less severe form, and can revert back to the a pre-civilization lifestyle to cure themselves. That seems to logically feedback into my initial contention about what causes Type II.
I was always quite thin until I had children. I had 6 pregnancies in 12 years and had a difficult time losing the weight. Then menopause hit and I did gain some belly fat. I just thought this was what happened when you turned 50. So I decided to do something about it. I had always exercised, played competitive tennis and walked and hiked but I dedided to double my workouts so even on days that I played 2 hours of tennis I would go to the gym in the evening and do a class. I also switched to a vegetarian diet with almost no fat. It worked and I was able to take most of my extra weight off and I looked great. I was full of muscles from weight lifting. My eye sight began to get blurry so I went in for an eye check for new glasses. Upon further testing they found beginning diabetic damage in the back of my eyes. They asked me if I was diabetic , I said NO. Well with more tests I found I was very diabetic and had high cholesterol even though I ate no fat, meat, cheese or eggs. My doctor was shocked, too. I was in the normal weight range, but not skinny. My doctor told me to lose some more weight and exercise more. I thought he was crazy. I had just taken 50 pounds and exercise 3 hours per day. The first thing I did was to start eating eggs, cheese and meat and ditch a lot of the carbs. I had never eaten sugar or sweet drinks so that wasn't an issue. But being a vegetarian I ate a lot of whole wheat pasta, brown rice, fruit, quinoa, barley and lots of whole grain breads. As soon as I got rid of the whole grains I dropped another 30 pounds and am now close to 120 for the past coulple of years. That middle age belly that all my friends have disappeared more or less. So what you think a diabetic looks like may surprise you. I wear a size 2- size 4 . I've actually had people tell me I can't be diabetic since I am thin.
 
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