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Hey there, I'm feeling pretty overwhelmed and pretty angry at my body right now. I've been diagnosed with this adult onset type 1 diabetes for about 5 months now, and I've gone through the initial burst of enthusiasm to work this whole thing out, and now I'm in the angry denial stage.

I haven't got my sugars under control properly yet, and I've avoided testing them for 2 weeks now because it was so frustrating. I think they are high because I've been feeling sick again like I did before I was diagnosed. I;m taking my insulin, but have avoided my endocronologist for 3 weeks because he wants to put me on the basal bolus (sp) regime and it really scares me, the thought of more injections.

I'm a 34 year old woman, a mother, and I know I have to get healthy and in control of this, but right now, i'm sitting here crying because it all feels too much. The last straw was (oh the shame and indignation) was wetting my bed last night. I googled night wetting and realised that it must be linked to my diabetes, and this has just made me so upset.

I'm really sorry to introduce myself like this, but i really hope that I can find some encouragement and help here, because I think I really need it. It's midnight here in Oz, so I may not post anymore tonight, but I would really love to know if this kind of denial and anger is normal!
 

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So sorry that you're having such a rough go of it. You're not alone - almost every one of us has gone through a grieving process after being diagnosed as diabetic. And it's really tough to contemplate a lifetime of fingerstick tests and injections. I promise you, though, that this will get easier and those tests and shots will just be part of your routine.

Don't fear the basal insulin - it may actually help you avoid a few shots of fast-acting insulin by handling those background hormonal needs for insulin. And please, please, please - don't avoid testing. The results from those tests are your first line of defense in managing your diabetes. We all want to run away from this in the beginning, but the fact is, we can't. So we just have to roll up our sleeves and join in the battle. See if you can find the books Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner and Using Insulin by John Walsh. These will help you get a handle on your insulin regimen and will give you a lot of confidence that you can succeed in managing your diabetes.

You really can lead a great life, even with this darned diabetes thing. Honest. I still do everything I did before I joined the club....gardening, hiking, entertaining, canoeing....nothing is out of reach.

Please keep posting...we want to know how you're doing.

Jen
 

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(((Wysteria))) It's a lot to absorb and accept in a very short time and I hope you find comfort here among others who have been through it.

Jen's advice is spot on.

Take care and visit us often . . . we'd like to help you through this.
 

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Welcome to the forum. I am so glad you joined, just knowing there are others dealing with the same issues makes it so much easier to deal with! Everyone goes through an initail grieving stage after diagnosis, its a natural way to feel..life as you knew it before is gone and you have a new life to deal with. Let me assure you...life is not anywhere near being over though! Diabetes can be managed. Many diabetics I know are actually healthier after diagnosis! Switching to a basal/bolus regimin is going to give you the best control of your blood sugar. Once you are having stable blood sugars you will be *so*amazed at how much better you feel...I promise...it is *so* worth it. Insulin injections can be a pain to have to have deal with all the time...but you know it gets to be a normal part of your routine after awhile. It just becomes something you do. Please do not avoid testing. You are an insulin user and it is imperative that you know if you are high or low before giving yourself any insulin. Once you start a basal/bolus regimen you can really fine tune everything by counting your carbs and dosing your bolus according to your blood sugar and the amount of carbs you are going to eat. I know it seems overwhelming, and a lot to learn, but it is honestly something that simply becomes part of your "normal life" after awhile. At some point, you might want to consider an insulin pump. I have been using one for about a year now and I am very happy with it :)

Please feel free to ask us any questions you need to and let us know how you are doing. There are so many people here that are a great support system. We are all here for you Now is the time to get healthy for yourself..and your family :) The books that Jen mentioned are awesome and I highly recommend them both.
 

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Hey there, I'm feeling pretty overwhelmed and pretty angry at my body right now. I've been diagnosed with this adult onset type 1 diabetes for about 5 months now, and I've gone through the initial burst of enthusiasm to work this whole thing out, and now I'm in the angry denial stage.

I haven't got my sugars under control properly yet, and I've avoided testing them for 2 weeks now because it was so frustrating. I think they are high because I've been feeling sick again like I did before I was diagnosed. I;m taking my insulin, but have avoided my endocronologist for 3 weeks because he wants to put me on the basal bolus (sp) regime and it really scares me, the thought of more injections.

I'm a 34 year old woman, a mother, and I know I have to get healthy and in control of this, but right now, i'm sitting here crying because it all feels too much. The last straw was (oh the shame and indignation) was wetting my bed last night. I googled night wetting and realised that it must be linked to my diabetes, and this has just made me so upset.

I'm really sorry to introduce myself like this, but i really hope that I can find some encouragement and help here, because I think I really need it. It's midnight here in Oz, so I may not post anymore tonight, but I would really love to know if this kind of denial and anger is normal!
Hello and welcome to the forum! Come on in and get comfortable, there is a lot to read here, read what interests you. I am sorry you are having such a hard time accepting this, but things will get better. Denial and anger are normal, hopefully you will get out of that stage and jump on the band wagon. There is a lot of support here and we would like to help you get through this. I hope you have time to visit often and take care!
 
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welcome Wysteria :) yes, it's normal to go through anger & denial.... you're still coming to grips with the diagnosis. To be honest with you we all have been through that at least once if not several times. I've been diabetic now for over 12 years and I really can't tell you what is normal as such... it's all a journey. But what makes a world of difference is a positive attitude... one that says no matter what I'm in control and not diabetes. Everyone here is very supportive and the advice on this post so far is spot on. You probably don't know a lot of diabetics perhaps? I don't really know that many myself... and I think I only really know one who looks after themselves. Make the choice to continue to test your BGLs as this is really crucial to your wellbeing. If you know what your BGLs are then you know how you're tracking.... docs will ask you too what you notice. Yes, I know you won't always be happy with your BGL readings.... I think all of us here would agree we are not always happy with BGLs 100% of the time and that doesn't matter how long we've had diabetes for... but knowledge is power as the saying goes... and hopefully by trying our best we get better results. Look forward to hearing your experiences. :hug:
 

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Wysteria, l perfectly know how you are feeling. No matter from where we are (l am writing from the other side of the pond) and how old we are (l am 35 and a father): we just feel the same any time. I felt the same when l was first diagnosed type 1, and even now that l struggle to get use with pump. I "avoid".... I avoid myself. Do you know l nicknamed the glucometer? I call it "the oracle"... Nontheless it happens, when l feel helpless and alone, that l face the needle, l stare into its metallic, lifeless eyes. We look at each other, diabetes and myself, until it is the needle which gets scared and turns its face away.... Buona fortuna.
 

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Nontheless it happens, when l feel helpless and alone, that l face the needle, l stare into its metallic, lifeless eyes. We look at each other, diabetes and myself, until it is the needle which gets scared and turns its face away....
Eloquent, poetic, inspirational. I won't forget this.
 

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Strange as it might seem, diabetes can be even poetic.... There is sunshine here in Rome, after days of rain.
 

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Just realized I had not responded to this .... hey, Wys, get your grieving work done, then read up and figure out how you are going to defeat this!

I, too, have T1.5, I did a lot of research in response to my dx -- after, of course, grieving IN THE HOSPITAL and at home, after .... I have 3 little kids, adopted from 3 countries (with great effort, it's not all Angie and Brad to go through, believe me!), two have developmental delays so will need parenting beyond the normal effort and years. I decided I have to handle this, AND WELL, for their sakes.

But I will add, you must work through your grief, first. And it sucks, and hurts. Just know we have all been there, in many different ways, and we got through it, you can too.

HUGS!!!
 

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Hey there, I'm feeling pretty overwhelmed and pretty angry at my body right now. I've been diagnosed with this adult onset type 1 diabetes for about 5 months now, and I've gone through the initial burst of enthusiasm to work this whole thing out, and now I'm in the angry denial stage.

I haven't got my sugars under control properly yet, and I've avoided testing them for 2 weeks now because it was so frustrating. I think they are high because I've been feeling sick again like I did before I was diagnosed. I;m taking my insulin, but have avoided my endocronologist for 3 weeks because he wants to put me on the basal bolus (sp) regime and it really scares me, the thought of more injections.

I'm a 34 year old woman, a mother, and I know I have to get healthy and in control of this, but right now, i'm sitting here crying because it all feels too much. The last straw was (oh the shame and indignation) was wetting my bed last night. I googled night wetting and realised that it must be linked to my diabetes, and this has just made me so upset.

I'm really sorry to introduce myself like this, but i really hope that I can find some encouragement and help here, because I think I really need it. It's midnight here in Oz, so I may not post anymore tonight, but I would really love to know if this kind of denial and anger is normal!
Wysteria,
i understand what you're going through. I'm a 19 year old male, healthy size, healthy weight and this too, is beginning to effect me. I was grand when i was first diagnosed as 1.5 (at the age of 17), i was enthusiastic to keep on top, kept track of my readings etc., but now thanks to college, everything has gone into a downward spiral. College has made me wreckless with the condition and medication. Lke you, i had an accident after an awful lot to drink, i understand though that its a side effect of the condition and i have to keep soldiering on. I have learnt the hard way as regards alcohol intake. Also like you, as i know that my condition is deteiorating i have avoided my readings.
I know myslef that its just a matter of copping on and I also know that this is manageable if you can keep on top as i have been there before. Although like i said i have been wreckless, im now making an attempt at keeping my head above water, i have started to exercise which helps keep the levels down and have also taken the expensive but worthwhile step of joining a gym. i am also trying to get into the routine of taking tests and meds too. This is all just a case of getting the balance right and i hope that this helps in easing youre frustration and "shame" as you know that you arent the only person to go through this.
Best of Luck...
 

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Wysteria,
i understand what you're going through. I'm a 19 year old male, healthy size, healthy weight and this too, is beginning to effect me. I was grand when i was first diagnosed as 1.5 (at the age of 17), i was enthusiastic to keep on top, kept track of my readings etc., but now thanks to college, everything has gone into a downward spiral. College has made me wreckless with the condition and medication. Lke you, i had an accident after an awful lot to drink, i understand though that its a side effect of the condition and i have to keep soldiering on. I have learnt the hard way as regards alcohol intake. Also like you, as i know that my condition is deteiorating i have avoided my readings.
I know myslef that its just a matter of copping on and I also know that this is manageable if you can keep on top as i have been there before. Although like i said i have been wreckless, im now making an attempt at keeping my head above water, i have started to exercise which helps keep the levels down and have also taken the expensive but worthwhile step of joining a gym. i am also trying to get into the routine of taking tests and meds too. This is all just a case of getting the balance right and i hope that this helps in easing youre frustration and "shame" as you know that you arent the only person to go through this.
Best of Luck...
Hello and welcome, ciaran. Thank you for joining us and I hope you'll be visiting often. The strength we gain from supporting one another is very real and we'd like to be able to support you in your renewed campaign to control this disorder.

Do take care & keep us posted!
 

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Hi Wysteria,

Wow, this hits pretty close to home. I am a newly diagnosed Type 1, and go back and forth through the mourning/aggravation phase. I am a 36 year old father of 4, so I have no choice but to work with it and get my body in check. This forum is a great support system and I rely on it pretty heavily. As others have said, please continue testing. This will be the window into your body.

Here is a poem that might help you (I did not write it)...



Life is a cycle that goes on and on,

But there are many challenging things,

Like which kinds of friends to hang out with,

The paths you should take,

What groups to hang out with,

But one of the least challenging is choosing to

Take care of your diabetes or not.

Diabetes is not somthing that can take over your life,

If you take care of it,

If you want to be free,

Then go ahead,

If you want to scream and get all your fustration out,

Then go ahead.

The more you fight with your diabetes,

The harder it is,

And if you have to fight too much then you choose a bad path,

To not take care of your diabetes.

Life is a winding road that goes on and on,

Until it is your time and turn to go home.

When you go home there will be no more pain,

No more suffering,

No more hurtfulness,

No more evil,

And no more wrong choices.

So remember,

There are lots of paths in this world,

Which one will you take?


- Jeremy
 
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