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So here it is, 4 months after my first proclamation that I have diabetes under control, and about 5 months since I first received a 128 fasting glucose score from a testing facility.

Rather than choose the LCHF diet option, which I felt was too restrictive and not something I could do for very long, I chose the low simple carb/eliminate sugar, drop a couple pounds, and get some exercise route. I feel I can do that for decades.

I eat whole grains instead of white versions, limit sugar to almost none, and eat basically anything I want as long as maintain or lose weight. I exercise daily, and use testosterone gel for low testosterone, which my research says can be related to low insulin production. I use no other medication.

Results: My fasting blood sugar is in the 90's or lower. My numbers are never in the diabetic range any more (usually in the 80's to 120' at 1 hour after a meal), and today after a rare test meal of a Whopper, fries, and a Coke (with sugar), I had a one hour reading of 99.

Although consensus on this board seems to favor the thought that when it comes to Diabetes, "You either have it or you don't," so you better eat LCHF, my experience so far says that eating a balanced diet, and exercising can do the job just as well - at least for me, and at least so far.

I would be interested in seeing long term studies of what happens to people who choose my chosen method of balanced diet and exercise, as opposed to people who jump right in to LCHF.

I know there are some people here with strong opinions. I'm not trying to start a war. I'm just stating my experience for those who care. Opinions on both sides are welcome. I'm here to learn.
 

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Congratulations on your good BG control. My opinion is that you caught your rising sugar levels very early on, and with corrections in diet/exercise were able to reverse your rising BG trends. You may be just a low carber & do not subscribe to the HF part of the diet recommended here because you did not need to. But you do need to ask yourself why did you get that 128 in the first place, and if you did go back to your old ways (before that reading) would you get that 128 again ? That would be the correct answer to "either you have it or you don't" question.
 

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So here it is, 4 months after my first proclamation that I have diabetes under control, and about 5 months since I first received a 128 fasting glucose score from a testing facility.

Rather than choose the LCHF diet option, which I felt was too restrictive and not something I could do for very long, I chose the low simple carb/eliminate sugar, drop a couple pounds, and get some exercise route. I feel I can do that for decades.
Best of luck! From what I've learned, I doubt it about the "decades" part. Doing what you're doing is from my perspective "skating too close to the edge" and is really no different from the 5 to 10 years of metabolic syndrome which preceded the first high blood sugar event.

In other words, for many years prior to ever having high blood sugar the disease was already there and marching (progressing) ever forward. During that time, insulin resistance was developing and as a consequence your pancreas was working overtime to keep up and slowly but surely degenerating and losing is capacity to produce. At the same time, the high insulin itself caused IR to continue to worsen. The fact that the medical establishment gives this condition a new name when the SYMPTOM of high blood sugar finally appears, doesn't make it a different disease - it is just another stage of the same thing.

So, now, by JUST lowering incoming glucose to what your remaining pancreas can "handle" (i.e., without elevated BG), you will continue to have abnormally high insulin, IR will not go away and will still be a problem and your pancreas will continue to degenerate, albeit more slowly than if you hadn't reduced your glucose load.

Can you see how these two conditions are nearly identical? If "progression" continued those 5 to 10 years before "diabetes", what would be the basis for thinking it won't continue to do so now? Sure, if a diabetic just lets blood sugars run high, things will get worse much more quickly, but I think it takes more than just getting back to that "edge" (where pancreas can JUST keep up) to stop the march forward of this disease.

Anyway, I hope we're still reporting to each other after those "decades" - then we'll know for sure!

BTW, what you "feel" about LC/HF without every trying it may turn out to be quite different than how you will actually feel doing it. I felt the same way. I was convinced for the first 3 weeks that it was impossible as my stomach gurgled and I felt some discomfort. After getting acclimated, I don't feel restricted in any way, have no doubt whatsoever that this is my way for life and would never think of going back - even if diabetes disappeared tomorrow! Life is that good for me now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Congratulations on your good BG control. My opinion is that you caught your rising sugar levels very early on, and with corrections in diet/exercise were able to reverse your rising BG trends. You may be just a low carber & do not subscribe to the HF part of the diet recommended here because you did not need to. But you do need to ask yourself why did you get that 128 in the first place, and if you did go back to your old ways (before that reading) would you get that 128 again ? That would be the correct answer to "either you have it or you don't" question.
Thank you for your reply. I think you make sense. I am not sure what would happen if I went back to eating a lot more junk, but I suspect my numbers would gradually rise. I want to mention that there is a chance that my BG reading of 128 at the lab was an error, or that it was high because I was a little sick and a little upset that they were late to open the office that day (it was in the Philippines that I had my test). I have hovered in the high normal range for years, so I'm still not sure if I really have it or don't. But I do think if I don't watch out I'll get it. My hope for now is that just watching what I eat and exercising will be all I need to never get full blown diabetes.
 

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Best of luck! From what I've learned, I doubt it about the "decades" part. Doing what you're doing is from my perspective "skating too close to the edge" and is really no different from the 5 to 10 years of metabolic syndrome which preceded the first high blood sugar event.

In other words, for many years prior to ever having high blood sugar the disease was already there and marching (progressing) ever forward. During that time, insulin resistance was developing and as a consequence your pancreas was working overtime to keep up and slowly but surely degenerating and losing is capacity to produce. At the same time, the high insulin itself caused IR to continue to worsen. The fact that the medical establishment gives this condition a new name when the SYMPTOM of high blood sugar finally appears, doesn't make it a different disease - it is just another stage of the same thing.

So, now, by JUST lowering incoming glucose to what your remaining pancreas can "handle" (i.e., without elevated BG), you will continue to have abnormally high insulin, IR will not go away and will still be a problem and your pancreas will continue to degenerate, albeit more slowly than if you hadn't reduced your glucose load.

Can you see how these two conditions are nearly identical? If "progression" continued those 5 to 10 years before "diabetes", what would be the basis for thinking it won't continue to do so now? Sure, if a diabetic just lets blood sugars run high, things will get worse much more quickly, but I think it takes more than just getting back to that "edge" (where pancreas can JUST keep up) to stop the march forward of this disease.

Anyway, I hope we're still reporting to each other after those "decades" - then we'll know for sure!

BTW, what you "feel" about LC/HF without every trying it may turn out to be quite different than how you will actually feel doing it. I felt the same way. I was convinced for the first 3 weeks that it was impossible as my stomach gurgled and I felt some discomfort. After getting acclimated, I don't feel restricted in any way, have no doubt whatsoever that this is my way for life and would never think of going back - even if diabetes disappeared tomorrow! Life is that good for me now.
Are there any studies you can recommend that support your statement? Also, are there any tests I can take that will show that the condition of my pancreas is deteriorating, and at what rate? Thanks!
 

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You only had once a fasting blood sugar reading of 128 maybe you had never diabetes. It takes at least two high readings to diagnose diabetes. But if you have, the damage can begins well before your high reading. This is elementary knowledge of diabetes that is common in all publication about the disease that you read. You should read more if you’re interested on knowing about the disease. Especially before you think you are qualify to make recommendations on treatment for people with the disease.

Diabetes - National Library of Medicine - PubMed Health

People with diabetes have high blood sugar because their body cannot move sugar into fat, liver, and muscle cells to be stored for energy. This is because either:

• Their pancreas does not make enough insulin
• Their cells do not respond to insulin normally
• Both of the above

Type 2 diabetes start showing symptoms about 10yrs before diagnosis

Washington, May 14 Type 2 diabetes start showing its symptoms as long as 10 years before it gets diagnosed in patients, who often have no idea about their condition before the damage is done.

Type 2 is a condition where the body does not produce enough insulin, and the cells ignore the insulin it does have. The condition may cause damage to the heart, kidneys, nerves and eyes.

Type 2 diabetes: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Diabetes is caused by a problem in the way your body makes or uses insulin. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells, where it is stored and later used for energy.

When you have type 2 diabetes, your fat, liver, and muscle cells do not respond correctly to insulin. This is called insulin resistance. As a result, blood sugar does not get into these cells to be stored for energy.

When sugar cannot enter cells, high levels of sugar build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia.

Type 2 diabetes usually occurs slowly over time. Most people with the disease are overweight when they are diagnosed. Increased fat makes it harder for your body to use insulin the correct way.

Type 2 diabetes can also develop in people who are thin. This is more common in the elderly.

Family history and genes play a large role in type 2 diabetes. Low activity level, poor diet, and excess body weight around the waist increase your risk.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You only had once a fasting blood sugar reading of 128 maybe you had never diabetes. It takes at least two high readings to diagnose diabetes. But if you have, the damage can begins well before your high reading. This is elementary knowledge of diabetes that is common in all publication about the disease that you read. You should read more if you’re interested on knowing about the disease. Especially before you think you are qualify to make recommendations on treatment for people with the disease.
Thanks for the info. I certainly don't think I'm qualified to make recommendations. I merely stated what seems to be working for me.
 

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When first diagnosed I just followed what the Doc told me which was pretty close to what you are doing and was happily believing that I was doing fine. I was mainly under 8 post meal but often between 8-10 which I thought was "satisfactory" since that's what it said on the literature I was given.

I still deteriorated though quickly needing Mefformin then Lantus. That was when I did a bit more research and decided that under 7.9 (140?) was actually satisfactory and under 10 (180) definitely wasn't.

The only way I could achieve this was LCHF and that is where I am.
 

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Kickinit, I wish you success in your chosen diet plan. As was mentioned before, you obviously caught it early. And since you are monitoring your BG, I'm sure you will be on top of any trend that might indicate a need to make dietary changes.

We all have to weigh what we are willing to do, vs what would be optimal to do, and come up with what will be a workable long-term plan.
 

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Kickinit,

I wish I could eat like that. I really do. The day before yesterday, I had 4 oz of cottage cheese and 3 more of high fat Farmer's cheese for breakfast. My blood sugar went from 114, immediately before eating to 162 1-hour post prandial. I was back down to 128 at 2 hours. (Supposedly about 8 grams of carbs.)

Yesterday morning, the Farmer's cheese alone took me from 110 to 122. I now have to give up cottage cheese.

One bite of bread, it doesn't matter whether it is white, whole wheat, rye, or sourdough gives me a 50 to 60 point increase in blood sugar at one hour and a 20 point increase at 2 hours. I've tested carefully, though not as sufficiently as I really need to do.

Jeff
 

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Jeff,

When you do that "testing" ... is that the only thing you eat and then test or is it in combination with other foods and that is the cumulative reading.

Thanks

Linda
 

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Kickinit,

I wish I could eat like that. I really do. The day before yesterday, I had 4 oz of cottage cheese and 3 more of high fat Farmer's cheese for breakfast. My blood sugar went from 114, immediately before eating to 162 1-hour post prandial. I was back down to 128 at 2 hours. (Supposedly about 8 grams of carbs.)

Yesterday morning, the Farmer's cheese alone took me from 110 to 122. I now have to give up cottage cheese.

One bite of bread, it doesn't matter whether it is white, whole wheat, rye, or sourdough gives me a 50 to 60 point increase in blood sugar at one hour and a 20 point increase at 2 hours. I've tested carefully, though not as sufficiently as I really need to do.

Jeff
Cottage cheese is one of my biggest regrets! 1/4 c max.
 

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Linda,

Yesterday and the day before, those were the only foods I ate. The day before that, I had a Sam's Club Brautwurst, some Jalzburg cheese, some bouillon, and the cottage cheese and Farmer's cheese. BG went from 107 to 148.

I was trying to isolate the problem. Immediately after the 2-hour test, I ate double the bratwurst and measured at the 3-hour mark. I was back down to 114. 4-hour mark, 111.

Had a Lettuce wrapped Big Carl Combo, upgraded to salad w/ Ranch dressing (no croutons). I tested the ranch with a urine glucose test strip. The maltodextrin just barely turned the color of the strip, so I put the Ranch on my salad. The sauce on the burger turned the test strip to the second level color, so I wiped that sauce off as best I could and put a bit of the ranch on the burger. At the 5- 6- and 7-hour marks, my meter read 116, 114, and 108 respectively. I didn't test again after dinner and I didn't test as thoroughly yesterday. Nor will I today.

Jeff
 

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So here it is, 4 months after my first proclamation that I have diabetes under control, and about 5 months since I first received a 128 fasting glucose score from a testing facility.

Rather than choose the LCHF diet option, which I felt was too restrictive and not something I could do for very long, I chose the low simple carb/eliminate sugar, drop a couple pounds, and get some exercise route. I feel I can do that for decades.

I eat whole grains instead of white versions, limit sugar to almost none, and eat basically anything I want as long as maintain or lose weight. I exercise daily, and use testosterone gel for low testosterone, which my research says can be related to low insulin production. I use no other medication.

Results: My fasting blood sugar is in the 90's or lower. My numbers are never in the diabetic range any more (usually in the 80's to 120' at 1 hour after a meal), and today after a rare test meal of a Whopper, fries, and a Coke (with sugar), I had a one hour reading of 99.

Although consensus on this board seems to favor the thought that when it comes to Diabetes, "You either have it or you don't," so you better eat LCHF, my experience so far says that eating a balanced diet, and exercising can do the job just as well - at least for me, and at least so far.

I would be interested in seeing long term studies of what happens to people who choose my chosen method of balanced diet and exercise, as opposed to people who jump right in to LCHF.

I know there are some people here with strong opinions. I'm not trying to start a war. I'm just stating my experience for those who care. Opinions on both sides are welcome. I'm here to learn.
I'm happy for your success however your story is very familiar to newly diagnosed T2 because you guys are in the honeymoon period with diabetes. I've heard and read many, many of such success stories like these over the years.
 
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