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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

I'm a type one diabetic and have been on the NOvomix 30 (2 injections a day) for several years now. Over the years my body has become familiar with the insulin intake that it is not as effective as it was before.

The doctor has recommended me to switch to a different kind of insulin to 4 times a day but I've been putting it off as 4 injections a day can become quite inconvenient and daunting. :(

I have been told that when people now are diagnosed, very rarely are they prescribed the 2 injections a day.

I am in my late 20s. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 

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Hello and Welcome: :)

Yes, 2 shots a day is certainly not the norm any more. The newer Insulins are more stable and have either milder or no peaks. This assures less fast-drop lows and lows in general. The Patient of course, still has to test his/her basal rates to make sure they are taking the appropriate amount of Insulin.

Taking more than 2 shots a day is called MDI(Multiple Daily Injections). Intensive Insulin Therapy(IIT) is another name by which much better sugar control is obtained so a Diabetic normally sees less complications down the road. With this therapy more testing is also a Good idea. The inconvenience of this MDI or IIT is well worthwhile and most get used to it.

Intensive insulin therapy: Achieving tight blood sugar control - MayoClinic.com

I use the 1/2 cc short needles that usually are painless or only cause minor pain. I last used the 70/30 back in the early 1980's. I was using the Insulin Pen back then also.


The next Insulin delivery system to look at is the pump. But most Diabetics are required to learn and have stable sugar control with MDI therapy first. It is important to have this base understanding.

You have a lot of Good years ahead of you that need not be cluttered with complications. :)
 

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Nph Insulin

Friendly,

Here is a helpful site for types of insulins...Insulin: Compare common options for insulin therapy - MayoClinic.com. Very early in my treatment I was using Humulin N -- which makes up 70% of the blend of Novomix 70/30. My injections were twice daily, and I found it harsh acting at late afternoon (about 3 PM) and in the wee hours of the morning (about 3 AM). What I experienced was actually that the acting curve of the insulin was not matching the acting curve of meals and glucose intake. As a result, I experienced high numbers after mealtimes and then low numbers between meals -- a delayed reaction. Years ago when I got a new doctor and told him the problems I was having, his opinion was that the NPH type insulins were not being used much anymore, and were mostly being used by older people who had very little knowledge of how these insulins act -- in other words, they have to have the doctor tell them what to dose and when they need to change dosage, etc. I got a book called "Outsmarting Diabetes" from some folks at the Joslin Clinic in Boston and began to learn the multiple injection method.

Yes, it was more hassle but I got used to it like washing my hands. It soon became apparent that my previous method of control was doing a very poor job at matching. (Even the multiple injections don't get it right all the time.)

Best wishes and good luck with your treatment.

reido
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies.

How do you manage to do your injections at work without people wondering why you are always running off to the bathroom with something in your hand and hearing clicking noises (as you push the pen) inside the bathroom?

I don't promote that I have diabetes to other people.
 

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I'm retired, ;) but I wasn't concerned if someone found out that I had Diabetes. My Bosses knew when I needed to tell them and the People I became Friends with, I told them when they noticed me doing something that had to do with my Diabetes. Depended on the situation. I was given enough time to look after myself at my jobs. It just seemed to fit in. I am not and never was ashamed of being a Diabetic. I can be whatever I want to be. :D I also did injections at work which didn't make noise.

It is probably in your Best interest to let People at your work know that you have Diabetes. You may need their help sometime and it will let you feel better by not being stressed by wondering if you've done something so People might find out. You can't blame them for wondering what that strange clicking noise is when they are not aware of your Diabetes and treatment. I suppose you could do the clicking when someone else is running the water, using the hand dryer or talking, etc. Be brave and Good Luck.
 

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Injections in Public

Friendly

I have the annoying (to some) practice of injecting in public places. I avoid restrooms for injections like the plague -- for obvious reasons. This practice really upset my Dad when we were in a public place -- odd because he had no qualms about lighting up something that smelled like dog crap and blowing it out in everyone's faces.

Anyway, either those who know me learned to get over it, or they no longer come around me when I'm injecting. Of course, people at work know I am insulin dependent -- they often come to me with questions about their own health or others in their family.

I'm in total agreement with Terrie here -- I yam what I yam...

reido
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
HI reido,

I don't have that confidence like you. I don't want to discriminated by people in the workplace. I know its illegal but people still do it. So what do you do when someone wants to discriminate you because of this medical condition??? There is nothing you can do. Somethings you cannot control.

Only my closest friends know that I am a diabetic and my manager also but my thoughts are its my business and no body elses so they do not need to know.
 

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One They Won't Forget

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Friendly -- While I can remember to tell you this story. I was in Murray KY in my motel room standing in front of the dresser mirror. Had a neck brace on after my surgery, and could not turn my head. So I am standing there in front of the mirror, pants down around my ankles, bent over trying to see my rear so I can stick a shot there... In walks the maid without knocking. You should have seen the look on her face. I never went back to explain.

reido:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
HI reido,

Thanks for sharing your story. It would have been such an awkward moment. Thats the thing with this illness and I believe others have experienced similar experiences. Injections to the uninformed person is quite daunting. I remember the first time I had my injection.... i poured my eyes out (back then i had little knowledge about the illness). If i was that frightened, people who knows nothing about it would be too.
 

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Dear Friendly...

I was diagnosed back in Feb of this year as a Type I and at first I thought ppl would think I was nuts to have to inject and things like that! I don't hide or make it public knowledge that I am giving myself my insulin... if someone is that curious as to what the clicking noises are and frequent trips to the bathroom then they most likely are going to be nosy enough to ask... It is nothing to be ashamed of.. it is NOT going to change and you can NOT get rid of it.. Hold your head of up high.. Don't let anyone bring you down or feel ashamed to do something that keeps you alive. Good Luck to you ...
 

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That is excellent advice Meg! You have been diabetic for only 7 months and yet you sound like an old pro. Lol! That attitude and your acceptance of your diabetes will lead to good control and a long, healthy life for you. Good luck to you Meg!

Richard
 
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