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Vitamin Foods are essential to life. Besides being needed for general health and well-being, food high in vitamins can have an effect on diabetes by reducing the risk of hypertension and atherosclerosis, minimizing the side effects of diabetes medication, reducing the oxidative process caused by diabetes, and enhancing the body’s ability to handle carbohydrates.

Many of diabetes symptoms such as high blood sugar, increased urination, nerve damage, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and the side effects of drugs used to treat these conditions, create a risk of developing nutrient deficiencies for patients with diabetes. One of these nutrients is vitamin D.

Vitamin D
The major function of vitamin D is to maintain normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones. If you remember from my article Main Causes of Hypertension, low levels of calcium can throw out of whack the sodium-potassium working machinery in the cells, leading to high blood pressure.
Vitamin D is connected to diabetes type 2

Here are two reasons for ensuring sufficient levels of vitamin D:

Vitamin D deficiency impairs the manufacture of insulin and its secretion in humans, suggesting a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

Researchers in Bulgaria showed that giving vitamin D supplements to diabetics during the winter improved control of their blood sugar levels.

The “Low Vitamin D, Poor Diabetes Control” Study
On June 2010 a study was presented at the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society, in San Diego by Esther Krug, MD, an endocrinologist at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore and assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore and colleagues. In this study, Krug and her colleagues decided to look at vitamin D deficiency in the wake of reports suggesting that vitamin D has an active role in regulating pancreatic beta cells, which make insulin.

They evaluated the medical charts of 124 people with type 2 diabetes seen at an outpatient clinic from 2003 to 2008. The charts contained information on the patients' age, race, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, family history of diabetes, and results of their hemoglobin A1c blood test.

Krug's team divided the vitamin D levels they found into four groups:
Normal (defined in the study as above 32 nanograms per deciliter)
Mild deficiency
Moderate deficiency
Severe.

In all, 113 of the 124 patients (91.1%) were vitamin D deficient -- 35.5% severely, 38.7% moderately, and 16.9% mildly.

The average A1c was higher in patients with severe vitamin D deficiency compared to those with normal levels of vitamin D. Those with severe deficiency had an average of 8.1%; those with normal vitamin D levels averaged 7.1%.

Krug found racial differences. ''In people of color, vitamin D levels were even lower than in Caucasians and they were associated with even poorer diabetes control," she stated. Only 6.4% were on vitamin D supplementation. This was true, Krug says, even though they had medical coverage and saw their doctors. She suspects a lack of awareness on the part of the physicians partly explains the frequent deficiencies she found.

Aggressive screening of vitamin D levels is crucial for people with diabetes, Krug says. Once a supplement is recommended, she says, the blood levels should be rechecked to see if the supplement sufficiently increases vitamin D levels.

Where do we find vitamin D?
Vitamin D is naturally present in very few foods. Dietary sources are:
• Eggs
• Salmon
• Sardines
• Halibut
• Catfish
• Mackerel
• Eel, cooked
• Tuna
• Fish-liver oils
• Liver
• Mushrooms, the only vegan source of vitamin D
Vitamin D is added sometimes to milk, yogurt, bread, margarine, and breakfast cereals among others. As you can see, including an adequate amount of fish in your diet, 3 or 4 times a week, can be a good source of vitamin D.

Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin because it can be obtained from the sun. In fact, as little as 10 minutes of exposure is thought to be enough to prevent deficiencies. Populations who may be at a high risk for vitamin D deficiencies include the elderly, obese individuals and dark-skinned people. Sunscreen “protects” against vitamin D formation, so if you wear it all the time, you are not making vitamin D.

Testing for Vitamin D deficiency
If you suspect you are low in vitamin D, ask your doctor to order a test. It is called 25-hydroxyvitamin D test, also known as 25(OH)D. Levels should be above 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L).

Final Thoughts
If your diet is not the healthiest one, you may not be getting the necessary amount of vitamin D or any others for that matter. However, do not rush to the nearest drug store and buy vitamin D. A multi-vitamin is usually okay but do not take a single vitamin by itself unless you are told to do so by a knowledgeable physician. Vitamins depend on each other to be effective, and large doses of one vitamin can upset the balance of nutrients.

To your health!

Emilia Klapp, RD, BS
TheDiabetesClub
 

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I have never seen any vitamin being recommended as much as D is lately, and that's over a lot of years on the planet. Seems like it makes a difference in anyone, diabetic or not.

It is included with most calcium supplements now because the body can't properly use calcium without enough of it it.

I've always doubted vitamin propaganda. I do take multivitamins but break them up and just use about a quarter of each one a day. But with D I'm convinced and take the recommended dose.
 

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Vitamin Foods are essential to life. Besides being needed for general health and well-being, food high in vitamins can have an effect on diabetes by reducing the risk of hypertension and atherosclerosis, minimizing the side effects of diabetes medication, reducing the oxidative process caused by diabetes, and enhancing the body’s ability to handle carbohydrates.

Many of diabetes symptoms such as high blood sugar, increased urination, nerve damage, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and the side effects of drugs used to treat these conditions, create a risk of developing nutrient deficiencies for patients with diabetes. One of these nutrients is vitamin D.

Vitamin D
The major function of vitamin D is to maintain normal levels of calcium and phosphorus in the blood. Vitamin D aids in the absorption of calcium, helping to form and maintain strong bones. If you remember from my article Main Causes of Hypertension, low levels of calcium can throw out of whack the sodium-potassium working machinery in the cells, leading to high blood pressure.
Vitamin D is connected to diabetes type 2

Here are two reasons for ensuring sufficient levels of vitamin D:

Vitamin D deficiency impairs the manufacture of insulin and its secretion in humans, suggesting a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

Researchers in Bulgaria showed that giving vitamin D supplements to diabetics during the winter improved control of their blood sugar levels.

The “Low Vitamin D, Poor Diabetes Control” Study
On June 2010 a study was presented at the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society, in San Diego by Esther Krug, MD, an endocrinologist at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore and assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore and colleagues. In this study, Krug and her colleagues decided to look at vitamin D deficiency in the wake of reports suggesting that vitamin D has an active role in regulating pancreatic beta cells, which make insulin.

They evaluated the medical charts of 124 people with type 2 diabetes seen at an outpatient clinic from 2003 to 2008. The charts contained information on the patients' age, race, vitamin D levels, calcium intake, family history of diabetes, and results of their hemoglobin A1c blood test.

Krug's team divided the vitamin D levels they found into four groups:
Normal (defined in the study as above 32 nanograms per deciliter)
Mild deficiency
Moderate deficiency
Severe.

In all, 113 of the 124 patients (91.1%) were vitamin D deficient -- 35.5% severely, 38.7% moderately, and 16.9% mildly.

The average A1c was higher in patients with severe vitamin D deficiency compared to those with normal levels of vitamin D. Those with severe deficiency had an average of 8.1%; those with normal vitamin D levels averaged 7.1%.

Krug found racial differences. ''In people of color, vitamin D levels were even lower than in Caucasians and they were associated with even poorer diabetes control," she stated. Only 6.4% were on vitamin D supplementation. This was true, Krug says, even though they had medical coverage and saw their doctors. She suspects a lack of awareness on the part of the physicians partly explains the frequent deficiencies she found.

Aggressive screening of vitamin D levels is crucial for people with diabetes, Krug says. Once a supplement is recommended, she says, the blood levels should be rechecked to see if the supplement sufficiently increases vitamin D levels.

Where do we find vitamin D?
Vitamin D is naturally present in very few foods. Dietary sources are:
• Eggs
• Salmon
• Sardines
• Halibut
• Catfish
• Mackerel
• Eel, cooked
• Tuna
• Fish-liver oils
• Liver
• Mushrooms, the only vegan source of vitamin D
Vitamin D is added sometimes to milk, yogurt, bread, margarine, and breakfast cereals among others. As you can see, including an adequate amount of fish in your diet, 3 or 4 times a week, can be a good source of vitamin D.

Vitamin D is known as the sunshine vitamin because it can be obtained from the sun. In fact, as little as 10 minutes of exposure is thought to be enough to prevent deficiencies. Populations who may be at a high risk for vitamin D deficiencies include the elderly, obese individuals and dark-skinned people. Sunscreen “protects” against vitamin D formation, so if you wear it all the time, you are not making vitamin D.

Testing for Vitamin D deficiency
If you suspect you are low in vitamin D, ask your doctor to order a test. It is called 25-hydroxyvitamin D test, also known as 25(OH)D. Levels should be above 50 ng/ml (125 nmol/L).

Final Thoughts
If your diet is not the healthiest one, you may not be getting the necessary amount of vitamin D or any others for that matter. However, do not rush to the nearest drug store and buy vitamin D. A multi-vitamin is usually okay but do not take a single vitamin by itself unless you are told to do so by a knowledgeable physician. Vitamins depend on each other to be effective, and large doses of one vitamin can upset the balance of nutrients.

To your health!

Emilia Klapp, RD, BS
TheDiabetesClub
Good thoughts.thank you so much for sharing such kind of information..
 

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One problem with vitamin D status appears to be poor absorption, due to the low-fat diet many are currently advocated. If you use a vitamin D supplement, be sure to eat it with a higher-fat meal, each day.

The nature of the fatty acids being consumed should be scrutinized, as well. Polyunsaturates are as a general rule not healthful.
 

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You do know that the recommended dosage of vitamin D in the US, 400IU, is on the verge of being doubled? Frankly, I'd suggest taking at least 1000IU daily. I am currently taking 3000IU daily as I am accustomed to living in the tropics and getting much more sun than I do here.
 

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You do know that the recommended dosage of vitamin D in the US, 400IU, is on the verge of being doubled? Frankly, I'd suggest taking at least 1000IU daily. I am currently taking 3000IU daily as I am accustomed to living in the tropics and getting much more sun than I do here.
cathyy - a woman after my own heart -- :D:D:D I take 400 per day and annual Vit D level check!
 
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