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One of the biggest challenges I face with diabetes is remembering that diabetes does not define me. It isn’t WHO I AM. It's just something I deal with in my life. What I mean is, why do I feel the need to bring in up in daily conversation? As an example, when the cashier in the store tells me they are having a special on chocolate eggs (which are of course, right next to the register) why can’t I just say, “No, thank you”. Why do I feel the need to add that I am diabetic?

What are some of the daily challenges that you face with diabetes?
 

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I try not to look at diabetes as a challenge, just something else to deal with like blood pressure, weight, or whatever else. As long as I know what I need to do to manage these things...that's what I have to do.
Everyone in my office knows I'm diabetic, I don't hide it and they all know now that I didn't cause it, didn't do it to myself because I got fat or ate my way to it.
 

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I think that social situations have always been the worst for me. I get tired of constantly having to explain myself. Settings like not eating cake at a kid's birthday party, not eating whatever food at any given business meeting or other gathering ... I feel like at first, I always had to justify, in a way, that if I ate X food, I would have uncontrollable blood sugar and it wouldn't be worth it. Before I got my blood sugar under control, I ended up in the ER more than once with highs over 400 and 500.

I was very active on this forum for a few years and then took a short break here and there to get a few work issues straightened out. Some of the older members will probably remember, I am really, really sensitive to certain carb loads.

For instance, I could eat a piece of cake or any very high sugar food or even a food I am overly sensitive to, like just a few cherries and have uncontrollable highs. For me, I get tired of having to explain myself as to why I can't even have "one" of something that I know will cause an excessive spike.

Its gotten easier over the years but still remains a challenge for me.
 

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lol you said it!

Its good because on one side, eating lchf gives me enough variety, where I never get "bored" with my way of eating. I have also pretty much stopped experimenting with different foods, for a really long time now. If I don't know how its going to affect me (even if its lower in carbs), I just skip over it and eat something else.
 

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Only two people in my life know that I have diabetes. I feel like I am always carrying a secret, always excusing… Not even my mother knows about my disease. It is lonely.
 

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Only two people in my life know that I have diabetes. I feel like I am always carrying a secret, always excusing… Not even my mother knows about my disease. It is lonely.
:sad2: That's why I love communities like this, though. While I definitely understand what you're saying, it can make it a little less lonely, since we can all come together here, and talk about various aspects of having diabetes.

I definitely think that being here makes it feel less lonely, although I agree it is still very tough in social settings and when you're around people who don't know. My family knows and a few close friends do, but not everyone around me knows, so I can definitely relate on certain levels.
 

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I definitely think that being here makes it feel less lonely, although I agree it is still very tough in social settings and when you're around people who don't know. My family knows and a few close friends do, but not everyone around me knows, so I can definitely relate on certain levels.
It helps to connect with people who share the same struggles as you. I find this place to be invaluable for me.

In real life I am thinking of ways to hide all my medicine and blood glucose test gear from my mom who plans on a prolonged visit. Sigh. If she found out, it would be an equivalent of telling her that I just got a death sentence. I hope it were different because I could use some support. I am so lucky to have my amazing husband by my side though.
 

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As chief-cook-and-grocery-shopper for 2 other adults and 2 rapidly growing boys beside myself (the only 1 with diabetes) all with dramatically different tastes I really have a hard time with planning meals and staying in budget. One of the bigger challenges is that one of the boys will not eat rather than eat something he does not particularly like-and he is quite thin to the point we are always concerned with his getting enough to eat. Some days I end up being short-order cook which can be really tricky for me with my CFS/ME or whatever name they've given it these dayTs. The other adults have sort of joined me on the LCHF way of eating ("This is a diet?") but will eat bread or other carbs especially when eating out. They've found it very effective as a weight loss plan. But then there are the kids-trying to get enough protein and fat into them when they have been used to mostly carby stuff has been difficult. We don't want them losing weight or skipping meals. And I need to stay LCHF.
 

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This is my challenge: Once in a while I have a very serious insulin reaction without warning. I don't know it is happening, but my room mate can tell. At some point, when I am too low to know what I am doing, she tells me to eat or offers me a slice of orange or something sweet and I refuse to eat or cooperate in any way. I don't remember any of this, but it has happened often enough that I dread it. She ends up feeling that I am rude (I'm sure I am!) and hurtful, and I end up feeling ashamed and guilty and pretty unforgivable. I test 10 times a day, so this is not a result of me being flaky. Sometimes it just happens, and looking back I still cannot always tell why. But I do lose my mind on those occasions, and I am hard to handle. It is a challenge because I seem to become somebody I don't want to be.
 

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Any chance you could calmly explain it to mom and then show her all the ways you use to manage it, so that it is controllable? If you're able to, it would take so much of that "hiding" stress away, especially during her visit.
For that to happen her rational side would have to prevail over her emotional one. It's hopeless. :sad2:
 

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Only two people in my life know that I have diabetes. I feel like I am always carrying a secret, always excusing… Not even my mother knows about my disease. It is lonely.
I totally understand, in my case only my mom and my doctors are aware that I am diabetic, being 25 and type 2 brings around a lot of nasty comments. :sad2:
 

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Taso - I can understand that. I have traveled here and there, even before my diabetes diagnosis, and I know that in different places, food choices definitely lack, making it difficult.

Kathryn - I hope that you will definitely seek doctor assistance if the lows do get more frequent, as to where you experience that. I am glad its only once in a while but very sorry its happening.
 

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Diabetes has made travel a lot more complicated for me. It's just difficult to eat well on the go, and there have been plenty of occasions when I ended up just starving for the lack of reasonable choices.
I make sure I carry enough non-perishable food along with me, with good macro balance, to sustain me: A bag of almonds, sunflower butter, cheese (which is actually more tolerant of not being refrigerated than I would have expected), then look for salads (including salads with plain grilled meat) so I don't have to eat every meal from my staple supply. But I'm not too picky about eating the same thing every day :vs_unimpressed:
 

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I totally understand, in my case only my mom and my doctors are aware that I am diabetic, being 25 and type 2 brings around a lot of nasty comments. :sad2:
We have a lot of medical maladies in our family - and we've always been very open about them. With that history I was surprised at how hesitant I was to tell anyone I have T2 diabetes.

I know a lot of T2 diabetes is genetic. Mine is. (Everyone, regardless of weight or activity) who is my age or older who is a descendant of my maternal grandmother has it). But intellectually knowing it doesn't make it any easier to tolerate the knowing looks because of the media hype that diabetes is caused by being inactive and obese.
 
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