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MY FB using runany where from 125-291 range before meals am a type 2 diabetic and take mediform 2x aday 1000mg and levermir at night 40 units
 

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Those are numbers a diabetic sees. If you want to avoid going blind and loosing your feet you need to have BG numbers closer to non diabetics numbers.

I try to keep my numbers under 140 ALL the time.
 

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Bs

MY FB using runany where from 125-291 range before meals am a type 2 diabetic and take mediform 2x aday 1000mg and levermir at night 40 units
Wow youre on insulin at night and it still gets that high? You might have to speak to youre dr to modify things a bit. I still see 291 but only when Iam sick or miss count my carbs.
 

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MY FB using runany where from 125-291 range before meals am a type 2 diabetic and take mediform 2x aday 1000mg and levermir at night 40 units
Are you adjusting your diet at all? Can you exercise? These are things that can have a great impact on reducing your levels. Tell us more about how you manage your diabetes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you adjusting your diet at all? Can you exercise? These are things that can have a great impact on reducing your levels. Tell us more about how you manage your diabetes.
I do few chair excirses because i have hard time standing, walking, am disablied so i try do what i can am revisting a diabetes educator on 29 to make any justements to my diet
 

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I do few chair excirses because i have hard time standing, walking, am disablied so i try do what i can am revisting a diabetes educator on 29 to make any justements to my diet
The chair exercises do well . . . keep it up! And you can begin right away adjusting your meals by avoiding the high-carb foods like bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, etc., and anything else with sugar or starch. Eliminating these foods from your diet will effect an immediate drop in your blood sugar.
 
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maybe just review the amount of carbs you eat... there should be at least one low GI choice with every meal & snack especially if you're on insulin. It's 1-2 exchanges for snacks (15g is 1 exchange) and 2-4 exchanges for main meals... maybe try the lower exchange first and see if you notice any improvement with your BGLs throughout the day. The other option is to discuss your med dosages, including insulin with your doctor as it may need adjusting.
 

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maybe just review the amount of carbs you eat... there should be at least one low GI choice with every meal & snack especially if you're on insulin. It's 1-2 exchanges for snacks (15g is 1 exchange) and 2-4 exchanges for main meals... maybe try the lower exchange first and see if you notice any improvement with your BGLs throughout the day. The other option is to discuss your med dosages, including insulin with your doctor as it may need adjusting.
There's no real need to include carbs in snacks or meals just because you use insulin. In fact, smaller carb loads lead to less insulin use. By carb counting instead of using the exchange concept, you match your insulin use to what you're eating - you make your meds match your lifestyle instead of the other way around. I find that my own blood sugar is best managed by eating under 20 grams of carb with meals; I concentrate on protein and fat. Do I still have lots of carbs sometimes? Yes - the Holiday gods will attest to that! But in general I choose non-starchy carbs, avoid most fruits and grains, and enjoy big salads and things like butternut or spaghetti squash or cauli-rice regularly.

Jen
 

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I am also somewhat restricted in what exercises I can do - age 74 with COPD, so I run out of breath easily. What's working for me - a pair of 3-pound weights which I use for my arms and shoulders, and a stationary bicycle for my legs. Both are new to me, but I am already seeing a gain in strength. I can't do either very vigorously or for very long, but something is better than nothing.
 

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I am also somewhat restricted in what exercises I can do - age 74 with COPD, so I run out of breath easily. What's working for me - a pair of 3-pound weights which I use for my arms and shoulders, and a stationary bicycle for my legs. Both are new to me, but I am already seeing a gain in strength. I can't do either very vigorously or for very long, but something is better than nothing.
Is your COPD bad enough for you to qualify for supplemental oxygen?
 
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hi Jen
I was just quoting what I've always been told by endo & educators. I guess everyone is different with their experience. Personally if I don't eat carbs I get very sick. I once tried the "soup diet" before I knew I was diabetic and after a day I had absolutely no energy and felt very sick... now that soup was very nutritious but it had no carbs at all. If a don't have anything within 3-4 hours now I get hypo's. It's a case of trial & error. It's good you're able to not have any carbs and you're Ok.
 

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Hi mep - you are not kidding! Diabetes is definitely not a one size fits all condition and it takes a willingness to be your own lab rat to find the right path. I do eat carbs, just not too many. But....I'd trade the huge quantity of, say, broccoli that I can eat instead of the tiny morsel of potato that my body can tolerate any day. (Especially with some cheese melted on top!)

What's the soup diet? I love soup, but yikes! I couldn't do it every day....that would make me feel deprived and craving all the goodies I was missing! (OK - maybe matzoh ball soup would work........LOL)

Jen
 

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The problem with cutting carbs from a diet when you've been used to lots, is that it does take several days (perhaps up to ten) for the body to adjust to a fat burning system. Until that point you suffer from what my wife describes as "carb flu".

Exercise is more difficult and you do get tired quickly. :(

Once that period is past however, you'll (generally) find you feel more energetic that you have for years. :) However if you don't work it through and quit too soon, you go back to square one.:confused:

Currently, I get about 90 grams of carbs per day in a diet of 2,200 calories with all necessary vitamins and minerals and have lost 30 lbs in weight over the four months since August this year. I don't currently take any medication at all.

It does work for me but as has been said, this disease is most certainly not a "one size fits all" system (despite what the doctors say!)
 

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Sometimes it takes up to several months to get used to a very low carb diet. When I was doing 30 carbs a day I did go through the Atkins flu for awhile. At first you will have terrible carb cravings but my trick was to have very low carb snack always available to eat, so you are not tempted to cheat. Over Christmas I did cheat on some christmas cookies and boy did I pay for it. Bg's have been higher in the morning and the carb cravings have returned.
 

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I was greatly relieved to get home from our holiday travels - to a house where there ARE no carby temptations! Right now I have a kettle of eggs simmering on the stove to use for deviled . . . those are always the best quick snack for me, if DH doesn't get to them before I get a chance! :rolleyes:

I also need to make some guacamole & that means . . . (wait for it . . . . ;)) CHEESE CRISPS for dippin'! :D

Sometimes it takes up to several months to get used to a very low carb diet. When I was doing 30 carbs a day I did go through the Atkins flu for awhile. At first you will have terrible carb cravings but my trick was to have very low carb snack always available to eat, so you are not tempted to cheat. Over Christmas I did cheat on some christmas cookies and boy did I pay for it. Bg's have been higher in the morning and the carb cravings have returned.
 

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The problem with cutting carbs from a diet when you've been used to lots, is that it does take several days (perhaps up to ten) for the body to adjust to a fat burning system. Until that point you suffer from what my wife describes as "carb flu".

Exercise is more difficult and you do get tired quickly. :(

Once that period is past however, you'll (generally) find you feel more energetic that you have for years. :) However if you don't work it through and quit too soon, you go back to square one.:confused:

Currently, I get about 90 grams of carbs per day in a diet of 2,200 calories with all necessary vitamins and minerals and have lost 30 lbs in weight over the four months since August this year. I don't currently take any medication at all.

It does work for me but as has been said, this disease is most certainly not a "one size fits all" system (despite what the doctors say!)
Whoops! :eek:

The diet did good things for my blood sugar, but perhaps my eyesight (or arithmetic) still needs attention. My weight loss should read 20 rather than 30 lbs.
 

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Low carb

In the late 1990s I had gained weight and was diagnosed with insulin resistance. I had been a type 1 diabetic for 50 years prior to that time. I started taking a type 2 med (Avandia) and it helped me very much with my resistance.

In order to lose weight I gradually reduced my daily carb intake to 130 carbs. I adjusted to that level. Then I reduced some more to 100 carbs, but I never could adjust. I could not do mu normal exercise routines properly, I was so exhausted much of the time. I went back to 130 carbs per day. I have lost most of my excess weight and am presently 11 pounds overweight. I am now eating 150 carbs per day and am not gaining weight. Working out at the physical fitness club three days per week helps. My treadmill at home gives me my cardio training.
 
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hi Jen
I did this soup diet that was the rage at the time & was published in our local paper... I've tried to find the exact recipe for you (I didn't keep the paper) on the net... but can't really find exact match. The closest to it though: Kick-Start: stage one soup recipe - Today Tonight
The soup I tried had a lot less carb in it and the first 2 days you were only allowed soup only and no other foods. The link above is different to what I did. But I would never do this again.... nor will I ever try Optifast again (which I've done)... I think these type of things just completely stuff up your metabolism. I had such a hard time trying to lose weight after being on Optifast it wasn't funny. The soup diet some of my colleagues also did at the time and they lost heaps of weight between them... although they all gained that weight & at least one gained more than she had lost. I reckon sticking to a healthy balanced diet is the key. I just have to focus on keeping my BGLs below 10mmL... that's the expectation by endo's here.
 

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mep,

Your views are much the same as mine. "Funny" diets don't work. The only way to control blood sugar (and/or lose weight) is to eat a healthy balanced diet with real food and reduced carbs.

My own view is that the current food pyramid is designed to support American grain producers and let them sell what the produce - grain - not give us a healthy diet.

Don't get me wrong, this is not a Brit having a go at our cousins from over the pond. It's just a statement of fact that the developed world is largely modelled on the USA as regards diet and their marketing experts rule the world.

The other thing we need to lose is our sweet tooth. I've noticed that almost every American based "low carb" recipe seems to replace the sugar with an artifical sweetener. Again, this is only my view but I think most of these chemicals, newly introduced to us in the last half century are doing us no favours in the longer term. I can't prove it, but I find it hard to believe that we can get something for nothing and reading Bernstein's "Diabetes Solution" suggests to me that I'm not the only one with reservations.

Our ancestors ate what was on offer, animal or vegetable. They didn't have a chemical industry offering "new improved recipes" every other week.

As I said in previous posts, since my diagnosis in August, my wife has been feeding me a diet which averages around 2,200 calories per day with a carb content of a bit less than 100 grams per day. Since August, sugar no longer features in my diet at all and it hasn't been replaced by any artifical sweetener. Packaged meals form no part of the diet. This does have the downside that real food seems to cost a bit more than "convenience foods" and Judy has to spend some time in the kitchen preparing the meal.

I've lost a fair bit of weight - I'm now stable at around 70kgs (155 lbs), down from 83kg and up for almost anything.

Sustaining a healthy diet takes effort. Anyone who says otherwise is either lying or kidding themselves. I'm lucky - most of the work falls on Judy, my part is simply to do what I'm told, and that isn't hard when I can see the excellent results.

I'm just waiting until after the holidays when I expect the doctor to send me for another HbA1c where I expect the result to be around 5.3% - down from the 8.2% of August.
 
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hi John
Yes, I agree that artificial sweetners are not ideal either. Here in Oz we have a new sugar on the market called 'logicane' it's basically sugar coated in molasses which scientists have recently discovered that coating sugar with molasses slows down energy release in your system making it low GI instead of high GI carb as usual. I went through a stage where I eliminated sugar & sweetners from my diet altogether.... but now I've introduced the logicane into my diet in very small amount. I find it's a good choice for us diabetics if we do have a bit of sweet tooth. I use it in my baking instead of normal sugar or sweetners... I'm the baker in the family. Unlike you, I have to cook otherwise I don't eat. lol. Being a fulltime worker sometimes makes it hard. What I tend to do is I do a cooking day when I get a chance and fill the freezer with ready made meals so if I can't cook due to time constraint... I defrost a ready made meal instead. The only problem I find is that sometimes I don't have the time some weeks and I may need to grab a frozen meals from the freezer aisle of supermarket.... not my first choice at all... only for convenience if absolutely necessary. :)
 
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