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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

A few days ago I was diagnosed with type II diabetes and I am only 19 years old. I never ate junk food and I exercised for four days a week with one hour cardio and 30 min weights. My BMI said I was at a healthy weight. However, I was also diagnosed with Polycsystic Ovarian Disease which increases the risk of type II diabetes drastically and I never knew that and ate a lot of carbohydrates such as cereals, rice, and lots of fruits. I didn't really eat that much meat. I am so scared now because I don't want to go blind or lose my feet or get heart disease or anything else. I went to the grocery store this morning and stocked up on leafy greens (I read that we should eat that) such as spinach, collard greens, etc. I also got 1 bag of apples, 2 bags of almonds, and some salmon and skinless boneless chicken breast and skinless drumsticks. I am getting rid of all my old foods (cereals, frozen fruits, bananas, fresh fruits, pasta, rice, etc)

I have some questions on what I can eat because this new diet is tasteless, bland, and I'm always hungry. I am never filled with it. I have been eating a lot of spinach salad lately (it's basically what I eat for every meal). I use a lot of spinach, some chicken or tuna, almonds, fresh tomatoes, half of a medium sized apple, 6 blackberries, squeezed lime inside, and aged red wine balsamic vinegar. Is this okay?

Can I eat these and how often

0% fat plain yogurt
Oranges
Bananas
What type of fruits should I eat
Tofu dogs
Can I eat cookies or noodles once in a while?
Pancakes (I usually NEVER eat pancakes, I've only eaten it like once in my life but I'm always craving pancakes now)
Eggs (I don't like eggs, the only part I like is the yolk)
Puffed wheat
All bran cereal
2% milk
Lime
Balsamic vinegar and Red wine balsamic vinegar (It has 0 calories, no fat no carbs, no nothing but I read on one forum that it is too sweet but it has no sugars in it)
Basmati rice
Potatoes
Tomatoes

Additionally, I was wondering how you can spice your food to make it taste good. I come from a really ethnic family and I am always eating delicious ethnic food. Now I can't eat them because of the spicing. I know we shouldn't use spicing high in salt but in all the recipes I have seen basically all you can use is like fresh herbs, garlic, lime, and vinegar and they sound so bland. I haven't gotten my kit yet so I can't test my blood sugar yet. I only weigh 120 pounds and I am 5'6. Will this make me lose more weight?

Sorry for all the questions. I'm just really scared about what I can eat.
I go to the gym every day after uni classes for 50 minutes of heavy cardio. I go six times a week. Is this good enough? Should I be doing weights as well?

And does anyone have any good tofu, salmon, or chicken recipes that is low in fat and salt?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I also noticed that some people said to eat almonds and walnuts but those are high in fat. I know it's unsaturated fats and omega 3 fatty acids but I am still weary to eat them. Can someone also give me like...a meal plan if it's not too much trouble?
 
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Hello MissInquisitive and welcome to the forum.

Most of us here eat a low carbohydrate/high fat diet (LCHF) which means that we refrain from eating the following:

bread
rice
flour
pasta
rice
milk (lactose)
cakes and cookies
fruit, although many of us find we can eat berries without spiking our bs
sugar in all forms, e.g. lactose, fructose, glucose

We do eat:
meat (with fat left on)
chicken (with the skin left on) thighs and drumsticks are the best. breast is too lean
fish, especially those high in omega-3
leafy vegetables
eggs
bacon
cheese
Like you, I only like egg yolks, so for breakfast I make an omelette with two medium eggs, bacon and cheese. And I enjoy it now!

You will need to use your meter to find out what you can and can't eat and how much of each, because what works for one diabetic won't work for another. Test before each meal and then one and two hours later, to see whether what you ate has spiked your blood sugar. If something spikes you, remove it from your diet.

There are lots of recipes here in the subforum to this one.

Also, a really good introduction to managing your blood sugar can be found on the blood sugar 101 site. The site owner is a diabetic who had done a lot of research on the topic and explains it all in a very clear manner, without too much jargon.

And do read the older threads in these forums. Everyone here has been where you are now, and understands the emotions that you are going through.

Best of luck. This is a very friendly place, so keep asking questions.
 

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Sorry, I'm trying to figure out the same thing but wanted to ask you something about what you said.

Was the doc that diagnosed you a GP doctor or an endocrinologist?

The reason I'm asking is because I'm waiting to see a specialist to give me a more specific diet because the one I have now has some holes in it. I'm trying to figure out if I'm going to get more help because a lot of stuff online is crap which is why I sought out this forum.

Obviously articles online can be good and bad, but even my dietician was wrong about some stuff. Searching for the correct meals is like a rubik's cube, too many combos unless you know what you're doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry, I'm trying to figure out the same thing but wanted to ask you something about what you said.

Was the doc that diagnosed you a GP doctor or an endocrinologist?

The reason I'm asking is because I'm waiting to see a specialist to give me a more specific diet because the one I have now has some holes in it. I'm trying to figure out if I'm going to get more help because a lot of stuff online is crap which is why I sought out this forum.

Obviously articles online can be good and bad, but even my dietician was wrong about some stuff. Searching for the correct meals is like a rubik's cube, too many combos unless you know what you're doing.
A general practitioner. And yes! It's so confusing. Some said I could eat bananas and then others said no. Some said I could eat basmati rice and others said no. Some said I could eat the yolk of eggs others said only the whites
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello MissInquisitive and welcome to the forum.

Most of us here eat a low carbohydrate/high fat diet (LCHF) which means that we refrain from eating the following:

bread
rice
flour
pasta
rice
milk (lactose)
cakes and cookies
fruit, although many of us find we can eat berries without spiking our bs
sugar in all forms, e.g. lactose, fructose, glucose

We do eat:
meat (with fat left on)
chicken (with the skin left on) thighs and drumsticks are the best. breast is too lean
fish, especially those high in omega-3
leafy vegetables
eggs
bacon
cheese
Like you, I only like egg yolks, so for breakfast I make an omelette with two medium eggs, bacon and cheese. And I enjoy it now!

You will need to use your meter to find out what you can and can't eat and how much of each, because what works for one diabetic won't work for another. Test before each meal and then one and two hours later, to see whether what you ate has spiked your blood sugar. If something spikes you, remove it from your diet.

There are lots of recipes here in the subforum to this one.

Also, a really good introduction to managing your blood sugar can be found on the The site owner is a diabetic who had done a lot of research on the topic and explains it all in a very clear manner, without too much jargon.

And do read the older threads in these forums. Everyone here has been where you are now, and understands the emotions that you are going through.

Best of luck. This is a very friendly place, so keep asking questions.
So I should eat high fatty foods like bacon? Isn't that bad for your health and heart like it has too much cholesterol and saturated fats.
 

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Are you going to see a specialist?

Yea, a few things I was told were ok for me to eat were actually not:

Whole grain pastas and breads, almost all fruit, and it seems like even the good stuff is bad for me if I eat too much of it; all of these things are awful for me.

That's why I just need to get into see somebody that specializes in this kind of treatment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Are you going to see a specialist?

Yea, a few things I was told were ok for me to eat were actually not:

Whole grain pastas and breads, almost all fruit, and it seems like even the good stuff is bad for me if I eat too much of it; all of these things are awful for me.

That's why I just need to get into see somebody that specializes in this kind of treatment.
I will in a few weeks. I know how you feel. All the stuff I love eating, especially my fruits, I can't eat anymore. This sucks so much
 
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So I should eat high fatty foods like bacon? Isn't that bad for your health and heart like it has too much cholesterol and saturated fats.
Eating cholesterol doesn't give you high cholesterol. Your body makes the cholesterol in your blood.

And saturated fats are good for you. Man-made fats such as trans fats are bad for you. Carbohydrate is bad for you.

Do take an hour or so to look at the site I recommended, blood sugar 101. It will answer many of your questions. Then you can come back here and ask those you still have. :)

Limiting carbohydrate intake severely and replacing it with good fats is the only way you will be able to control your blood sugar and keep it down in the normal range. You need to do this (keeping your bs in the normal range) to avoid having to take more and more medication leading to taking insulin and possibly suffering the nasty complications of the disease.

I was diagnosed on 4th November last year, and by following the LCHF method of eating, I have been able to keep my fbs between 4.1 and 5.3 since the first week. I have had only 2 test results at all in the diabetic range since I started. Both of those were within the first couple of weeks.
 

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First of all, doctors give out misinformation all the time. Don't assume that just because a doctor tells you a certain food is OK that it is. The basic fact is that Carbs, all carbs raise bgs. Some will raise it a small amount, some a huge amount. How do your know? BG testing, lots of it. In the beginning test before and 2 hours after the first bite. Record your bgs in a notebook. After awhile you will definitely see patterns. You want the lowest numbers possible but definitely not over 140. Since non diabetics rarely spike over 120, I use that number for my goal. By using this method I have cut out a lot of carby foods from my diet. I don't eat cereal, bread, wheat crackers, wheat pasta, rice or fruit, white potatoes or corn. You might think then what do you eat. I have a fantastic diet. These are the staples of my diet

Bacon and eggs
Pancakes and waffles made with almond flour or flaxseed
deli meats like pepporoni, ham, turkey
salad greens
homemade soups with tons of veggies
small amounts of black beans, refried beans, chilli beans
all sorts of meats, I prefer organic when I can afford them
all sorts of hard cheeses
small amounts of greek yogurt ( make sure you test, though)
Nuts ( I usually eat about 1/4 cup a day but be careful if you need to lose weight)

I have basically given up all wheat but I do bake cookies, muffins and cakes using almond flour, coconut flour, flaxseed and eve whey powder. Check out our recipe forum. You don't have to give up your favorite foods you just need to bake them differently. Also since you are young and fit, you may want to ask your doctor to run a GAD antibody test to see if you are LADA, slow onset Type 1.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
First of all, doctors give out misinformation all the time. Don't assume that just because a doctor tells you a certain food is OK that it is. The basic fact is that Carbs, all carbs raise bgs. Some will raise it a small amount, some a huge amount. How do your know? BG testing, lots of it. In the beginning test before and 2 hours after the first bite. Record your bgs in a notebook. After awhile you will definitely see patterns. You want the lowest numbers possible but definitely not over 140. Since non diabetics rarely spike over 120, I use that number for my goal. By using this method I have cut out a lot of carby foods from my diet. I don't eat cereal, bread, wheat crackers, wheat pasta, rice or fruit, white potatoes or corn. You might think then what do you eat. I have a fantastic diet. These are the staples of my diet

Bacon and eggs
Pancakes and waffles made with almond flour or flaxseed
deli meats like pepporoni, ham, turkey
salad greens
homemade soups with tons of veggies
small amounts of black beans, refried beans, chilli beans
all sorts of meats, I prefer organic when I can afford them
all sorts of hard cheeses
small amounts of greek yogurt ( make sure you test, though)
Nuts ( I usually eat about 1/4 cup a day but be careful if you need to lose weight)

I have basically given up all wheat but I do bake cookies, muffins and cakes using almond flour, coconut flour, flaxseed and eve whey powder. Check out our recipe forum. You don't have to give up your favorite foods you just need to bake them differently. Also since you are young and fit, you may want to ask your doctor to run a GAD antibody test to see if you are LADA, slow onset Type 1.
Thanks a lot! This helps so much! So I should be eating more meats than and veggies than anything else. I usually never eat potatoes but once in a while (like once every few months) I eat a baked potato. Is that okay or no? I can't test yet. So I guess I'm going to have to wait. How often can I eat things made with almond flour because it's still carbs. Right?
 

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As a pre-diabetic, my main concern is to eat things that do not spike my blood glucose above 140 two hours after a meal. So when I was first diagnosed I ate simple meals and tested after them to see how they affected by BG. What a shock!

I ended up cutting down tremendously on sweets and starches (desserts, fruits, grains, peas, beans, potatoes). I still include them (I follow a moderate carb regimen) but not much and not that often, and in amounts that my meter has told me work for me. So, for instance, I can still have baked beans, but instead of a 1/2 cup I eat a 1/4 cup. I still eat bread sometimes, but one slice rather than two.

For me, it really helps to have data from my meter that confirms what works for me and what doesn't. There have been some surprises... "healthy" oatmeal spikes me much more than white rice does, for instance. And I feel and work better on much lower carb than I expected.
 

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Thanks a lot! This helps so much! So I should be eating more meats than and veggies than anything else. I usually never eat potatoes but once in a while (like once every few months) I eat a baked potato. Is that okay or no? I can't test yet. So I guess I'm going to have to wait. How often can I eat things made with almond flour because it's still carbs. Right?
1. Most diabetics do better if, when they reduce carbs, they keep the protein moderate and increase fats. If you consume more protein than your body needs, the excess will be converted and stored in the liver, and later re-enter your blood stream as glucose.

2. If you can't yet test, then follow the advice previiously posted and cut way back on the starches, and if you have them, then make it only occasional and in small portions.

Almond four and flaxseed meal have few carbs, so one serving of a batch of muffins made with them will have probably 2-3 grams of carbs, so one a day is just fine, carb-wise. (Nuts are nutritionally dense and will stall weight loss if eaten to excess, even if they don't raise blood suger.)

Unfortunately, I can attest to this by personal experience. :mad:
 

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Thanks a lot! This helps so much! So I should be eating more meats than and veggies than anything else. I usually never eat potatoes but once in a while (like once every few months) I eat a baked potato. Is that okay or no? I can't test yet. So I guess I'm going to have to wait. How often can I eat things made with almond flour because it's still carbs. Right?
If you are serious about controlling your blood sugar, and by that I mean holding it below 7.7 at all times, then you'll have to limit the carbohydrate in your diet and that includes potatoes. It also includes most fruits, fruit juices, all grains like corn, wheat, rice, oats, etc., and anything made with grains, like bread, pasta, crackers, chips, etc.

The best way-of-eating for controlling diabetes is low-carb/high-fat. You have already made yourself clear in another thread how you feel about some of these fats, but you're just going to have to take our words for it that it a safe and effective food plan. We have the scientific evidence to prove it in our own A1c numbers, and our own lipids profiles, our own weight loss records.
 

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You need to check your BG before and after food to find out how the food is impacting your BG. It may not the same for everyone.

This is what I learned after joining this forum.
Thats what I call quick learning Faith !
 
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