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Discussion Starter #1
Hello

I have just been diagnosed with type 2. I was not prepared for that diagnoses nor was it something my Dr was looking for. It was found in some routine blood work. So I was totally unprepared at my office visit. Now that the dust has settled, I was wondering...


How does diabetes causes all the various complications? Obviously glucose levels play a role but what is the connection? What causes the actual damage? How does it all fit together?
 

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To avoid complications Brian is to keep your Blood Glucose at 6 MMOL/L or 100 MD/GL and there is a tolerance that can be accepted. Exercise is also the key too.
 

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Thanx for the reply Anthill.

Im looking for more a technical reason. I have read a bunch of articles about complications but nothing so far as why it causes complications. Does a high level of glucose cut off blood supply to some organs ... IE eyes, kidneys, nerves etc. Does a high level somehow stop nutrients from reaching their destination? I guess what Im asking is how does glucose do its harm?
 

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Well generally High BG's have an effect on many parts of your body and also the varying of BG can have it's causes too. Firstly the high BG that stays in the blood stream will have damage to the cardio vascular system and the eyes go first as bleeding occurs. There are many other causes as this is just the tip of the iceberg. :(
 

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I damn near spit out my coffee. Did you say bleeding eyes?
It appears like red to black floating dots that's in your eye and there is one way to cure those and that's Lazar Treatment. Sorry if I have scared you. :eek:
 

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Having only been diagnosed seven months ago; I'm most certainly not an expert.
But here's what I've learned so far.

The excess glucose in your blood causes your kidneys to work extra hard to get rid of the excess glucose. I suppose eventually your kidneys may stop working.

If you're diabetic because you've become insulin resistant; your pancreas works harder to pump out even more insulin. I suppose eventually your pancreas may stop working. And/or your body simply will not accept it's own insulin; causing you to need to start using man-made insulin.

During the Holidays I consumed A LOT of foods high in sugar. Several loafs of fruit cake, dozens of bagels with cream cheese, a dozen bottles of sparkling cider, lots-n-lots of soda, etc ...
This caused my vision to get blurry nearly overnight. I thought my vision was getting blurry on New Years day; but wasn't certain. I woke up January 2nd and could not see the TV on the other side of the room !
Both the doctor who diagnosed me and the eye doctor who checked my eyes to determine if I did any permanent damage; said the blurry vision was/is caused by the excess glucose in the lenses of my eye. The excess glucose caused my lenses to become swollen. And my eyesight will return to normal when my BG returns to normal and the excess glucose is slowly removed my my lenses.
Between being diagnosed on January 2nd through early February. My eye sight went from not being able to see two inches past my nose, to the most fantastic far vision a person could image, and finally back to normal.

In my Diabetes Education class; the diabetes educators said most people who get complications from diabetes are people who refuse to monitor their diabetes and take care of themselves.

So the good news is; IF you control your blood sugar and keep it with in normal or acceptable range. You probably will be able to avoid complications.
 

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Good post Ett, Yes the BG control is a must do to stay healthy & happy. :D I just hope I will not get too much more compications that I have already. So control of knowing your Blood Glucose is at the target. :p
The real frustration is know what's safe to eat and ballance that with insulin & exercise and with todays labor saving devices is making the diabetes worce as this is making us lazy. Computers add to this too. :rolleyes:;)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It appears like red to black floating dots that's in your eye and there is one way to cure those and that's Lazar Treatment. Sorry if I have scared you. :eek:
Yeah you freaked me out...Ha Ha. Im alright now, I had to "Google It" to find out what you meant. I got a better understanding now. For a brief moment, I was wondering how I was going to explain to my co-workers, why I look like a zombie! To funny...
 

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Thanks for replying Ett.

I believe I might already have some eye damage. I experience blurred vision, floaters and flashes. I read somewhere that diabetes affects the circulatory system of the retina. Arteries in the retina become weak and leak. Blood leaks into the retina, causing spots or floaters, along with decreased vision. The outcome of this can be retinal detachment and glaucoma! Not a pretty picture.

Here's the link: Diabetic  Retinopathy

That is a lot of food Ett! I dont start my diabetes class's for 2 more weeks. Hell Im not even sure how to read a food label. But it makes me wonder how Im going to handle the holidays this year. Its going to be difficult at best with all that good food going around.
 

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Your thread about "how many carbs" made me re-read my notes from Diabetes Class.
Here are a few tidbits:

Keeping A1c in target reduces risk of:
Heart Attack by 16%
Eye Damage by 21%
Kidney Disease by 34%

Eyes, kidneys, and liver should be checked yearly.
Kidneys and liver should be checked via urine not just blood.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Your thread about "how many carbs" made me re-read my notes from Diabetes Class.
Here are a few tidbits:

Keeping A1c in target reduces risk of:
Heart Attack by 16%
Eye Damage by 21%
Kidney Disease by 34%

Eyes, kidneys, and liver should be checked yearly.
Kidneys and liver should be checked via urine not just blood.
That is a pretty good reduction of complications, huh? I was just reading your signature, you went from A1c=11.2 to A1c=5.2 in 6 months. I hope I can get mine that low in that amount of time.
 

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That is a pretty good reduction of complications, huh? I was just reading your signature, you went from A1c=11.2 to A1c=5.2 in 6 months. I hope I can get mine that low in that amount of time.
I was fortunate to receive a blessing in disguise.
When I was diagnosed; I was employed as a Linux Administrator in a 6-month contract-to-hire position. They terminated my contract three months early as soon as they learned I became diabetic (the very next week).
Although with the current economy this means I'm still unemployed 6 months later. It also means I haven't had to deal with the stress of a job. And I've had plenty of time to take care of myself with exercise and eating correctly.

No more eating only once a day; which was junk and/or fast food;, 18+ hour days, 27+ days per month, and no more oncall weeks in which it was not uncommon to be kept awake from Tuesday morning straight through Friday afternoon.
I now have time to actually get some exercise; such as walking and kayaking.
I usually do my job hunting in mornings through early afternoon. And I spend my late afternoons through evening getting exercise.
This has let me lose 80lbs in almost 7 months.
My weight is now down to where is was before I started working in IT 10 years ago.

After taking your Diabetes Education class you will learn much about foods and exercise. And you will lower your Ac1 too.
Just take one day at a time, learn as you go, and you'll do fine.

--ET
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I was fortunate to receive a blessing in disguise.
When I was diagnosed; I was employed as a Linux Administrator in a 6-month contract-to-hire position. They terminated my contract three months early as soon as they learned I became diabetic (the very next week).

--ET
That is BS. How can they get away with that? I have read some articles about that very thing. I know there is a strong support to rewrite and improve the law. The US House of Representatives approved the ADA Amendments Act of 2008. I believe it still has to go through the Senate.

Lawmakers said that people with epilepsy, diabetes, cancer, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and other disabilities had been improperly denied protection because their conditions could be controlled by medication or were in remission.

You should read this man's story: American Diabetes Association Urges Congress to Pass ADA Restoration Act, Help End Employment Discrimination Against Americans With Diabetes - Health News - redOrbit
 

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That is BS. How can they get away with that? I have read some articles about that very thing. I know there is a strong support to rewrite and improve the law. The US House of Representatives approved the ADA Amendments Act of 2008. I believe it still has to go through the Senate.

Lawmakers said that people with epilepsy, diabetes, cancer, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and other disabilities had been improperly denied protection because their conditions could be controlled by medication or were in remission.

You should read this man's story: American Diabetes Association Urges Congress to Pass ADA Restoration Act, Help End Employment Discrimination Against Americans With Diabetes - Health News - redOrbit
They could get away with it because I was only a contractor and not a permanent full-time employee.
And I have noway of proving why they ended my contract early and didn't hire me as a permanent full-time employee.
 
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