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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was talking to another diabetic friend of mine the other day, and we got to talking about what a cure to diabetes would entail for one another. Long story short, we both had very different ideas about what one should be. I was on the side of just not requiring much control, and he believed in returning to a pre-diabetic state.

Now I'm not trying to start a pipe-dream discussion on the possiblities of one ( it'd be a long ways off), but what would a treatment have to do for you in order to be considered a cure? I'm interested in what different people think about the subject.
 

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I have often thought about this question and how i would respond. But before I begin, I have to stress that there is probably a huge difference in how we answer depending on whether we are a Type 1 or Type 2.

My answer is going to seem hard to believe but hear me out. As a Type 2 that is not currently on meds or insulin, my sole means of controlling my BG numbers is done with diet and exercise. That said, I'm...in a strange way, grateful that I was diagnosed with Diabetes. Again, hear me out. I was very overweight, smoking a pack of cigarettes per day, and eating extremely poorly. I was sitting on my butt all day. My heart attack woke me up....made me think about my lifestyle and what I was doing to myself and the diabetes diagnosis that followed forced me to change my diet. I've mentioned this before on this forum, without these two events, I would likely be dead. I survived that first heart attack but without the changes I have made, I would likely not survive a second and my Diabetes would have gotten much worse. However, I wouldn't have known what was wrong. I never go for checkups at the doctors. I hadn't seen a doctor in over 20 years so I would have continued doing what I was doing, oblivious to the warning signs.

Sure, I hate not being able to eat certain foods and Im not a fan of pricking my fingers numerous times per day and I hate it when I encounter huge uphill during my frequent walks BUT I feel great! So if I was cured and able to do and eat whatever I wanted, I would probably fall back into the trap of eating unhealthily. I would revert to eating fries, and bread, rice and pasta. I would eat tons of chocolate bars, (I miss you Mars Bar!!!), and I would be back to my overweight ways and at risk for another heart attack. Nope, No cure for me please!
 

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I'm not sure I'd revert to the old ways I ate. I'd just now and then eat some fruit, some pasta maybe, but not much would change. I'd not dare drink a Coke, cause that's what brought me here, and one would lead me back to the one a day I drank in the past 40 years!
 

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Anything that involves treatment is quite simply not a cure. The only thing that could be called a cure is a complete seversal to what I was like at 10 years old.
 

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For me a cure wouldn't be a cure if your could eat too many carbs and come down with it again, so a cure for me would be to go back to the state when my bg was acting totally normally, and have a guarantee that no matter what I ate, I would never get diabetes again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
To Adjitator:

I understand where you coming from ( exact stance my buddy has) and while in a perfect world that would be fantastic, I'm not sure if that could ever be a reality. But who knows?

To CanadianDude:

I've actually heard several other diabetics mention to me before that they may not want a cure, for fear of reverting back of old, bad dietary habits. I'd like to think that if a cure existed we wouldn't go back to old ways, but human nature is human nature. It's an interesting take on it though, that's for sure.
 

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I can only speak in Type 2 terms here ...

If I understand correctly, many of us Type 2s develop something known as Metabolic Syndrome years before we become diabetic (or pre-diabetic, which, for many of us, compares to "a little bit pregnant.") In effect, it could/should be considered the first symptom of diabetes.

It appears the syndrome may cause the overeating, obesity, and resulting insulin overflow that eventually leads to a Type 2's worn-out pancreas.

Anyway, a "cure" for Type 2 diabetes that restores pancreatic function, but does not also correct the whole metabolism plus any hormonal imbalances, would (for me) simply be a license to go back and redo the damage.
 

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The on-line Merriam-Webster say "a : recovery or relief from a disease ". I'd be very happy for a cure. I'm the same weight as prior and I ate healthy before. When I was first diagnosed I was not too bummed as at least there was a treatment and I am in control of the treatment. I can hoplefully avoid any long-term complications with tight control. However, it is a royal pain in the tush. I'd be very happy cured. I think I already said that.
 

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No offense, but I keep reading this "eat whatever I want" and it just sounds a little spoiled brattish to me. Maybe its because 35 years of fasting for a month every years (Ramadhan) has taught me something.

There are people who never eat enough their entire lives and people who have to live off the food no one else wants and we're crying about having to just omit one food group - and one we have ZERO biological need for at that? I'm sorry, I just can't see the "difficulty". I eat as much as I want, its delicious and I'm satisfied.

And, I'm also tired of hearing this "I always ate healthy". Surprise! No, you didn't. Not healthy for YOU, anyway. You ate way too much carbs way too little fat and possibly too much protein. You were helped to fool yourself with the latest fads like whole grains, extra fiber or whatever. You might have thought (or been told) that it was healthy, but subsequent events prove otherwise.

Eat what's good for, leave what's bad for you and move on! Call it cured, call it prison, whatever you like. It is what it is.
 

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No offense, but I keep reading this "eat whatever I want" and it just sounds a little spoiled brattish to me. Maybe its because 35 years of fasting for a month every years (Ramadhan) has taught me something.

There are people who never eat enough their entire lives and people who have to live off the food no one else wants and we're crying about having to just omit one food group - and one we have ZERO biological need for at that? I'm sorry, I just can't see the "difficulty". I eat as much as I want, its delicious and I'm satisfied.

And, I'm also tired of hearing this "I always ate healthy". Surprise! No, you didn't. Not healthy for YOU, anyway. You ate way too much carbs way too little fat and possibly too much protein. You were helped to fool yourself with the latest fads like whole grains, extra fiber or whatever. You might have thought (or been told) that it was healthy, but subsequent events prove otherwise.

Eat what's good for, leave what's bad for you and move on! Call it cured, call it prison, whatever you like. It is what it is.
If all I had to was eat right I wouldn't even consider it a disease but an eating disorder. Leave it to the type 2's to make even this post about what we eat.
 

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Very sorry. I completely forgot this was a "mixed" forum (others where I post are not).

My message was definitely NOT intended for a type 1 and has no relevance to their situation and the problems they confront.


If all I had to was eat right I wouldn't even consider it a disease but an eating disorder. Leave it to the type 2's to make even this post about what we eat.
 

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Then why did you post to a thread that was started by a type one.
 

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No offense, but I keep reading this "eat whatever I want" and it just sounds a little spoiled brattish to me. Maybe its because 35 years of fasting for a month every years (Ramadhan) has taught me something.

There are people who never eat enough their entire lives and people who have to live off the food no one else wants and we're crying about having to just omit one food group - and one we have ZERO biological need for at that? I'm sorry, I just can't see the "difficulty". I eat as much as I want, its delicious and I'm satisfied.

And, I'm also tired of hearing this "I always ate healthy". Surprise! No, you didn't. Not healthy for YOU, anyway. You ate way too much carbs way too little fat and possibly too much protein. You were helped to fool yourself with the latest fads like whole grains, extra fiber or whatever. You might have thought (or been told) that it was healthy, but subsequent events prove otherwise.

Eat what's good for, leave what's bad for you and move on! Call it cured, call it prison, whatever you like. It is what it is.
Sorry, but I believe your words are unduly harsh.

Here in the US (and likely elsewhere, but this is the country I know), an starchy, unbalanced diet is pushed on us from pre-school on. We're pushed by our educators, government officials and the medical profession -- the folks who are paid to know better. In the case of diabetes, most get their guidelines from the American Diabetes Association, which receives substantial funding from Big Agriculture and food manufacturers.

The push for carbs affects available choices in stores and eateries, and our social lives as well.

Doctors are often slow to diagnose diabetes. For example, I was considered "low risk," despite my age, weight and family history.

Strong conditioning, deeply reinforced.

Carbs happen to be the most prevalent food category. And, often, the cheapest.

My workplace is in a poorer neighborhood. Here, it is difficult to find any fresh/whole foods, at any price. Services are scarce, cars are scarce and public transport is unreliable.

I live in a middle-class neighborhood. My house is within walking distance of a wide variety of stores and eateries, all chock-full of bread and pastries and noodles.

Low-carbing can be a costly, never-ending hunt. And a major hardship for many.

I guess I'm a lucky brat ... I can afford it. Sorta.

But it's hard work. Often, it's frustrating and lonely work. But the folks on this Forum DO that work. Venting, however, is an occasional necessity. Please don't be so quick to call names, or scold us for wanting some respite.

(Protein doesn't affect me. Diabetically speaking, anyway.)
 
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Yikes! We (as people in general) need to relax. No one is going to agree with anyone 100% of the time. If a response offends you, move on. I have learned that diabetes can spark debate and heated discussion very simply. The poster just wanted to know some opinions. Take it and leave it as that folks.

For me, a cure would mean no more need for treatment. That my body could take care of itself. No testing, no shots, no pumps, no check-ups (minus the yearly physical that is 'normal')... What I decide to eat would still be up to me but that does not mean I would go 'hog wild.'
 

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Just eliminating the worry of the long-term complications would be good enough for me. I don't mind the shots, the finger pricking, fiddling with my pump, etc. I certainly don't mind healthier eating and I love working out. I don't really even mind all the doctor visits. I just hate the worry of what is going to happen later in my life.

I'd also like to get rid of the hereditary thing so that if I ever have children, I won't have to worry about passing it on to them or their children.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ecal:

I understand what you mean about the long-term, and to an extent I wonder if that would satisfy me as well. I mean, in all honesty, long-term complications are ( minus getting incredibly low) the only real reason diabetes requires so much control.

As for the hereditary thing, I'm not to well-versed on the subject, but from what I know the chances aren't as bad as you'd think. I know if a male type 1 has kids, there is a 1 in 17 chance of passing it. I'm not sure the stat for a woman.
 

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smorgan said:
No offense, but I keep reading this "eat whatever I want" and it just sounds a little spoiled brattish to me. Maybe its because 35 years of fasting for a month every years (Ramadhan) has taught me something.

There are people who never eat enough their entire lives and people who have to live off the food no one else wants and we're crying about having to just omit one food group - and one we have ZERO biological need for at that? I'm sorry, I just can't see the "difficulty". I eat as much as I want, its delicious and I'm satisfied.

And, I'm also tired of hearing this "I always ate healthy". Surprise! No, you didn't. Not healthy for YOU, anyway. You ate way too much carbs way too little fat and possibly too much protein. You were helped to fool yourself with the latest fads like whole grains, extra fiber or whatever. You might have thought (or been told) that it was healthy, but subsequent events prove otherwise.

Eat what's good for, leave what's bad for you and move on! Call it cured, call it prison, whatever you like. It is what it is.
Seriously prejudicial. My diabetes came on from an autoimmune attack, NOT how I ate. Thank you for discriminating against me and others.

Honestly, a cure means that we could eat what we want. Whether someone is starving in another country is neither here not there. The logic doesn't apply to the question.

As for healthy eating? Too subjective. Different cultures have different eating patterns, taboos, etc.

Now, on to what a cure means for me?

To return to a time in my life where I could just eat with my family, and not haveto worry about counting carbs, testing BG, injecting, and worry.

Sometimes my kid is done before I get to sit down a d eat.
 

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Okay. This is the final round - final bell. I won't close the thread, but I expect sentient adults to pull in your horns & communicate in a courteous respectful manner. I understand only too well that other forums allow more intense discussions; I also understand that other sites break their forums down into separate boards to avoid the circumstances that can lead to these misunderstandings. At some future time we may expand but for now, this is how it is.

We are not other boards. We are small & close-knit. There is no place here for the kind of "blow-em-outta-the-water" or "put-em-in-their-place" posts that I've found elsewhere. We need to be more cognizant of where people are coming from before we make judgements & get involved in subjects we know little about. You may have noticed a dearth of comments from me on threads about using insulin. There's a reason for that, which is that I don't know sic 'em about insulin, and there are PLENTY of people here who DO know, so I need to stay out of those discussions.

This subject was sorta spring-loaded to begin with, posing a hypothetical question such as it does, but if handled with care, I think it can enable better comprehension & deeper understanding of the differences & the various difficulties faced by those of different types. Most of us know myths about type 2s being couch potatoes who brought it all on themselves with junk food, etc., etc., and there are just as many myths about type 1s like it's diagnosed only in children, they can't participate in active sports, etc. Our mission is to be supportive, learn everything we can to try to dispel the myths about all types, to step outside our own little bubbles to consider all angles of the issues, and above all, give our neighbors the benefit of the doubt.

 
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