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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was telling my sister that my glucose level was at 445 the other night. She said I should have went to the hospital. What do you think? She works at a group home for older women and when her consumers get that high they have to take them to the hospital for treatment. I was just a little tired and my vision was blurry. I laid down and when I woke up for work the next morning it had went down to 225. Im not sure what level I should step back and let the ER bring my levels down. What do you think is the appropriate level is to go the ER? I have no insurance at my job so Im very cautious about making a trip for something I could have done at home. I am already seeing a low income doctor that adjust payments for people with diabetes. Im type 2 and am on Metformin 500mg twice a day.:eek:hwell:
 

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I am not a health professional and I am type 1, so the guidelines may be different. However with a BG of 445 I would have gone to the ER. I can respect the fact that you have no insurance, but this is your life we're discussing. The high BG numbers can have a significant impact on your future life with diabetes. The higher BG can increase your chances of having diabetic complications with your heart, kidneys, liver etc.

Have you contacted your doctor about your high BG? When you have high BG numbers and are undecided what to do about it - at least drink a lot of water. This link may help explain it: Drinking Water May Cut Risk of High Blood Sugar

Please don't ignore this problem as it can become very serious.
 
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as a fellow Type 2, i have to ask "what are you eating?" 445 is about four times as high as it should be at any time
 

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I think you need to ask your doctor that question. I would also ask him about adding insulin to your management. 1000 mg of metformin is nothing. I have to take twice that amount to manage my bgs. Even then I will get an occassional spike above 140 and I freak out. My son went to the ER last year with the Swine Flu. His 15 minute visit cost them almost $2000. Since they have $2500 deductible insurance they had to pay the entire bill. So cost is an issue. If your bgs are routinely above 200 you need different meds or insulin ASAP. Also what is your diet like?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I eat out the machine at work. My levels have been over 200 for the longest. My doctor said she will evaluate my med when I go back the week of Thanksgiving and see if it needs changing. The metformin is making me sick.
 

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i think it's time for you to reduce your carb intake to zero and see if that helps your numbers
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay. I also think it is time I research the Internet for the right cookbook for diabetics. If anyone has tried any of these books let me know if they really work for diabetics.
 

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In my first year of diabetes I made the mistake of buying "Diabetic Cookbooks". My advice is Don't. You don't need a special cookbook, you just need to read labels. Do you have a carb counting book. Mine is a small paperback that gives the carb count of every food on earth. It will also give you the carb count of a number of chain fast food restaurants. I always take it with me when I travel. You also need to figure out how carbs affect your bgs. For me I know that 1 carb raises my bgs 1-3 points. So a 30 carb meal would raise me 30-90 points. So from tons of testing I figure the foods that spike me on the low side and rarely eat more than 15 carbs at a time. As a diabetic eating out of a vending machine is probably not a great idea. Bringing your own lunch is probably the best idea. Any meat, cheeses, hard boiled eggs, raw veggies, salads, dill pickles, leftovers from dinner or low carb soups are good ideas. You can find lower carb bread and wraps to make sandwiches. I would start cutting the carbs right now, and don't wait until your doctors visit. Are you on the Extended version of metformin, it is gentler on the stomach. Also you probably need a much larger dose. I take 2550 mg. But you may need some additional meds or a long acting insulin.
 
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Okay. I also think it is time I research the Internet for the right cookbook for diabetics. If anyone has tried any of these books let me know if they really work for diabetics.
Anything called a diabetes cookbook is worthless. If you're looking to buy a printed/bound cookbook, at least buy one for low carb recipes. Better yet, visit the low carb websites for tried & true recipes - the best kind! :)

Diabetes Recipes

Linda's Low Carb Menus & Recipes
(I've given you the induction menus because I think that's where you need to start - you have GOT to cut your carb intake drastically and soon)

This is just to get you started . . . and remember to search for low carb recipes, not diabetic. For some obscure reason, anything called diabetic seems to be loaded with flour & sugar. :(
 

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Dana Carpender 's cookbooks are great. She also lists the carb count etc.
 

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Someone said it already. At those levels and with the limited health-care options you face, you need to make radical changs in diet and make them fast!

Glucose in your blood is the problem. Glucose comes from things you eat - mostly from carbohydrates (ALL of them) but also from proteins. In the short run, get your carbs as close to zero as possible and keep your protein moderate. Here's some sample meals you can try:

Breakfast:
2 or 3 eggs fried in coconut oil or butter
Coffee (if you like it) with heavy cream (try to find real heavy cream, not "heavy whipping cream")
1 or 2 tablespoons of strained Greek yogurt
Kalamata olives (about 6)
High fat cheese (Laughing Cow, Kiri, Feta, Havarti, etc.)
Beef bacon (aka, "brisket), fried.

Other meals:
Boneless shortrib (a nice cheap cut), baked in its "juices"
3/4 cup string beans, brocolli, kale, chard or other green vegetable, steamed and SMOTHERED in melted butter and a little lemon or lime for flavo.
High fat cheeses
Mediterranean yogurt drinks (<= 2g of carbs per 8 oz)
Hot wings (no breading)

Snacks:
Cottage cheese
Celery with peanut butter
1/4 cup almonds or mixed nuts

Stick to something like the above and sugars will come down fast. If you still can't get below 140, look for some insulin.
 
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Okay. I also think it is time I research the Internet for the right cookbook for diabetics. If anyone has tried any of these books let me know if they really work for diabetics.
I didn't understand why diabetic cookbooks were so useless to me as a noninsulin using T2. Then a T1 explained what makes a cookbook diabetic to him is accurate carb counts, regardless of how many carbs there happen to be. Accurate carb counts allow insulin users to administer insulin correctly.

Many noninsulin using T2s feel they are better served by low carb oriented cookbooks.

I've eaten food out of a vending machine on a regular basis too. Almonds, peanuts, and beef jerky. Not much else in a vending machine that won't send someone spiking except maybe diet soda and water.
 

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Vending machines here in Stockholm are a catastrophe! They are completely full of high-carb stuff with only one exception.

Example:

Top row: chips, chips, chips, candy, candy, candy
next row: candy, candy, candy, candy, candy, candy (Optimist can testify to the amount of candy that Swedes eat!)
next row: cookies, cookies, pastry, pastry, pastry.
next row: Chocolate, chocolate, chocolate, chocolate, chocolate, chocolate.
next row: Condoms!, Suagarfree gum (the exception!), chocolate, fruit yoghurt, an apple, chocolate milk.
Last row: water (ok, two exceptions), Coke, Fanta, Fanta, Fanta, Coke, Coke.

There aren't any "food" vending machines. What you see above is what I lived on while working late each day at the university just before my heart attack.
 
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I've eaten food out of a vending machine on a regular basis too. Almonds, peanuts, and beef jerky. Not much else in a vending machine that won't send someone spiking except maybe diet soda and water.
I was thrilled the other day to find pork crackles in the machine at work. Then I bought a packet and behind it were potato chips, just like all the other savoury packets in the machine. :(
 

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(Optimist can testify to the amount of candy that Swedes eat!)
In the US, I think Southerners eat a lot more candy than we do on the West Coast. When you walk into a grocery store there, you have to knock over displays of candy and pastries to get to anything else. Here on the West Coast, we tend first to see specials, flowers, cold display case of ready foods - but rarely candy (except Halloween of course) At least in my area.
 
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