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Hello!
My name is Olivia and a student at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. I'm currently working on a re-packaging project for the ONETOUCH MINI blood glucose monitor, and I would love to hear from anyone here in the forum who has TYPE 1 diabetes. I have a few quick questions that, if you could answer, would be extremely helpful in figuring out what the users' needs are with this product.
Here are some questions, I'd love to hear about your experience..

1. What was your reaction when you found out you had TYPE 1 diabetes?
2. How has your lifestyle changed since then?
3. Do you use a blood glucose monitor? If so, which one?
4. What do you think could be improved in the world of diabetes care and prevention by physicians?
5. Do you have someone supporting you in this? (family, friend, etc.) If so, who?

Again, thanks so much! :)
 

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1. I honestly don't remember my reaction, I was 2 years old.
2. Diabetes has always been part of my lifestyle, so I grew up with it and know no other way. I will say it allowed my life to be a bit more structured than most and allowed me to learn the importance of responsibility early on in life. It also made me work harder for the things I want.
3. I use a One Touch Select but carry a Pink One Touch Mini (last color the doctor had left) in my carry on bag.
4. I think the things that could be better for diabetics around the world are things revolving around accessibility. Some people use inferior insulins due to inaccessibility and therefore experience more complications. I would also like to see a bigger fight for Type I diabetics to fly, join the military, drive tractor trailers, and more. I don't think there will ever be a cure, and if there will be, I don't see it happening anytime soon. The world cares too much about Type II Diabetics to spend money on research for Type I diabetics. I'd also like to see people more educated on the subject. (We CAN have sugar)
4. My mother has been especially supportive, and even goes out of her way to call me several times a day, no matter where I am (My job revolves around World Travel) to make sure my Readings are alright.
 

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I can only mirror to what Joeprep has said.
I was diagnosed at 10 YO and all I know that I was so hungry as I could eat the house out!!! :eek:
Back then, Diet was the banning of sweet things as they did not know about Carbohydrates is the real enemy. Today we have much better insulins that makes food choices much better to handle and better understanding of what to look for to what food can do for you.

I just wish for the general public that Diabetes is not a diet related disease anymore, We can have sugar!!! We just have to know that we can manage it!!! :) Now wheres the marang that I have from the cake shop. :eek:
To those that it is as weight is an issue it to diet accordingly.
 

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1. I was 6 when diagnosed in 1945. I was frightened when I saw the expression on my mother's face at the time the doctor diagnosed me.
2. I don't remember my lifestyle before diagnosis.
3. I have used Free Style meters since Sept, 2006. I also use Walmart's Relion meter when I run out of Free Style strips. They are both good meters.
4. Too many doctors know very little about diabetes. Incorrect diagnoses are made in many instances. The general public in the USA has very little knowledge of diabetes. There is an estimated 24 million diabetice in the USA today. School children should be taught about diabetes. A good set of classes with videos and guest speakers could cause potential diabetics to take better care of themselves and, perhaps, prevent becoming diabetics by having better health.
5. My mother supported me when I was a child and in my early teens. My wife has supported me for the last 45 years.
 

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Joe, for most diabetics being diagnosed that long ago, it was a death sentence. One doctor in 1970 and another in the late 1970's told me I should not expect to live beyond my 40's. I am now 70 and I have no diabetes complications. there are over 500 diabetics in the USA who have lived more than 50 years with diabetes. A special study is being done on those diabetics on a volunteer basis. I will be examined before the end of this year. They are trying to find why some of us live so long without serious complications. Finding the reason may lead to some potential treatment for Type 1 diabetics in general while they are young so that they will not have complications.
 
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